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Portugal & Spain - Lisbon round-trip

8th October 2021 FOR 12 NIGHTS | Silver Spirit

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0808 202 6105
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This fly cruise holiday is financially protected by SILVERSEA under ATOL 4681

Freephone9am - 7pm

0808 202 6105

LAST CHANCE TO BOOK | EXCLUSIVE OFFER | EXCLUSIVE $250 FREE to spend on-board per couple | Includes Business Class flights and overseas transfers. 10% Early booking bonus induced - book and pay in full to receive these prices

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Please check that you can meet the conditions below in order to travel on this cruise

1) All guests need to be in possession of a valid UK passport. This is also the case on any British Isles cruises. Please click here to check your passport will still be valid on your dates of travel.

2) Please check your travel insurance meets any criteria as specified by your cruise line. You can check your cruise line requirements here. For a travel insurance quote click here. Proof of travel insurance may be required on boarding.

3) Please check the vaccination and testing requirements from the FCDO, your cruise line and any destination countries here

WHY WE RECOMMEND Mediterranean CRUISES

From historic capital cities to charming coastal towns dotted across a sun-soaked shoreline, there is so much choice when it comes to picking your perfect Mediterranean cruise itinerary. Take your pick from a host of voyages taking in the Western Mediterranean across Spain, Portugal and the French Riviera, or the Eastern Mediterranean including Italy, Greece and Croatia.

Whichever side of the Mediterranean you decide to explore, from the enchanting east to the legendary west - or even both - you will experience the warm climate, captivating culture and fascinating history for which the region is renowned. A Mediterranean cruise offers the opportunity to explore a different city every day - enjoying famous museums, pavement cafes and stunning scenery as you go. Why not book a Cruise and Stay holiday and extend your stay in a city such as Barcelona?

Mediterranean cruises are most popular during the summer months of June, July and August. The hot weather and warm sea make this the ideal time to visit the coastal town and cities. The spring and autumn are also good times to cruise, particularly if you wish to avoid the hustle and bustle of the summer season.

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itinerary

1
2

Lisbon

Lisbon, the capital of Portugal, is a city open to the sea and carefully planned with 18th-century elegance. Its founder is said to be the legendary Ulysses, but the theory of an original Phoenician settlement is probably more realistic. Known in Portugal as Lisboa, the city was inhabited by the Romans, Visigoths and, beginning in the 8th century, the Moors. Much of the 16th century was a period of great prosperity and overseas expansion for Portugal. Tragedy struck on All Saints' Day in 1755 with a devastating earthquake that killed about 40,000 people. The destruction of Lisbon shocked the continent. As a result, the Baixa (lower city) emerged in a single phase of building, carried out in less than a decade by the royal minister, the Marques de Pombal. His carefully planned layout of a perfect neo-classical grid survived to this day and remains the heart of the city. Evidence of pre-quake Lisbon can still be seen in the Belém suburb and the old Moorish section of the Alfama that sprawls below the Castle of St. George. Lisbon is a compact city on the banks of the Tagus River. Visitors find it easy to get around as many places of interest are in the vicinity of the central downtown area. There is a convenient bus and tram system and taxis are plentiful. Rossio Square, the heart of Lisbon since medieval times, is an ideal place to start exploring. After a fire destroyed parts of the historic neighborhood behind Rossio in 1988, many of the restored buildings emerged with modern interiors behind the original façades. The city boasts a good many monuments and museums, such as the Jeronimos Monastery, Tower of Belém, the Royal Coach Museum and the Gulbenkian Museum. High above the Baixa is the Bairro Alto (upper city) with its teeming nightlife. The easiest way to connect between the two areas is via the public elevator designed by Gustave Eiffel. Cruising up the Tagus River to the ship's berth, you can already spot three of Lisbon's famous landmarks: the Monument to the Discoveries, the Tower of Belém and the Statue of Christ, which welcomes visitors from its hilltop location high above Europe's longest suspension bridge.

08 Oct 2021 - 09 Oct 2021

3
4

At Sea

10 Oct 2021 - 11 Oct 2021

5

Horta, Azores, Portugal

Far adrift, in the Atlantic's vast sweep, Horta serves as a welcoming island respite for some truly epic ocean voyages. One of the most westerly parts of Europe, these Portuguese islands lie a full 1,100 miles from the coast of the mainland. The bustling marina here serves as the perfect stopover and a welcome respite for tired sailors and yachts embarking on transatlantic crossings. View less The colourful harbour is decorated with a multicoloured patchwork of their stories and flags, and adding to this massive, ever-growing mural is said to offer sailors protection while out on the seas. While Horta's clientele may come and go with the waves, there's nothing transient about the stunning volcanic cones and soaring wildflower-splashed hills that make up this beautiful Atlantic island pit-stop. Horta is the main city, and a charming welcome to dry land, as you step onto the pentagon-shaped island of Faial. On the frontier of continents, the violent meeting of the European and North American tectonic plates forged this beautiful archipelago - and the rich volcanic scenery here is ripe for exploration and adventure. The busy harbour lies before the dramatic backdrop of the neighbouring Pico Island's cloud-wisped peak - head up to Espalamaca Lookout for the best view of Horta's busy harbour and islands emerging nearby. Horta has a grand volcanic caldera of its own, and you can journey up through threads of cloud, to look down into the island's immense, bowl-shaped crater. The Lighthouse of Ponta dos Capelinhos is an island icon, having survived 1957's dramatic eruption. It now occupies a scenic location on a headland, surrounded by vast swathes of charred new land, which were churned out from the depths.

12 Oct 2021

6

Praia Da Vitoria, Azores

Set on the east of is the seventh island in the Azores (if you’re starting from the west) Praia da Vitoria often gets overlooked on your way to reach the mainland after days at sea. While many assume the Azores archipelago only offer hardy respite – not to mention terra firma – for travellers who have been enjoying a transatlantic crossing, the archipelago is beginning to gain global recognition as destinations that are well worth visiting in their own right. View less Praia da Vitoria literally translates as “the beach of victory” yet with such an auspicious name, one would be wrong to assume that it is only fun in the sun on the island. Laden with history dating back to the 15th century, Gaspar Frutuoso (the celebrated Azorean historian and priest), wrote about Praia in the 16th century calling it “noble and sumptuous”. The adjectives certainly ring true even today, with its jumble of narrow streets, recently modernised marina promenade and architectural marvels (the old town dates from 1480), Paria da Vitoria has lost nothing of its past grandeur. A stroll to the main square and its market place - unchanged since 1670, or down to the small 16th century fort south of the beach is proof of that! An interesting quirk to note about the town is that due to the two orders Santo Cristo and Misericórdia in the 18th century and in order to please everyone, everything was built in double. This means that the lovely Igreja do Senhor Santo Cristo church (also known as da Misericórdia) has two high alters and two choirs. The church dates from 1521 and was partially destroyed in a fire in 1921.

13 Oct 2021

7

Ponta Delgada

Providing a gorgeous green welcome to sailors venturing on the long journey across the Atlantic, Ponta Delgada’s shoreline is a reassuring sight, as it emerges into view. Sat on São Miguel Island, the largest of Portugal’s Azores islands - which wait on an outpost of western Europe, some 1,100 miles from the mainland. Ponta Delgada is the island’s largest city, and a place of spectacular volcanic vistas, steaming hot springs and impressive landscaped gardens. View less The city’s signature trio of arches welcomes you to Ponta Delgada, and its island of verdant volcanic contrasts. Wander between monochrome churches like the Gothic Church of St. Sebastian, and up to the Convent and Chapel of Our Lady of Hope – which houses the revered icon of Christ that is paraded through the streets annually, and believed to have miraculous powers by locals. Or, head for beaches offering sanctuary on charcoal-coloured sands, or the tropical António Borges Botanical Gardens, where tropical plants add extra shades to the Green Island's scenery. Now extinct, the mighty Caldeira das Sete Cidades is a truly awe-inspiring sight - and the colossal collapsed volcanic caldera blooms with lush greenery and scattered wildflowers. The vast crater has been taken over by a glowing, picturesque lake, which reflects the blue sky above. A full three miles wide - and with a circumference of eight miles - it’s a vast panorama to take in. The Lagoa de Fogo – or Lake of Fire – is another of the island’s calderas – rise up to see the crumpled scenery encasing a beautiful lake. São Miguel Island’s geothermal activity has practical uses too, and you can harness the powers to unwind any tired muscles after a long day, by sinking into the hot springs of Poca Da Dona.

14 Oct 2021

8

At Sea

15 Oct 2021

9

Sant Cruz De La Palma

Santa Cruz de La Palma is the capital city of the island of La Palma, in Spain’s Canary Islands. It’s known for its centuries-old architecture, cobbled streets and busy port. A former convent hosts the Museum of the Island of La Palma, with an art collection and exhibits on natural history and ethnography. The Naval Museum is in a replica of Christopher Columbus's 15th-century Santa Maria sailing ship.

16 Oct 2021

10

Las Palmas De Gran Canaria

Watch the stars glittering at night, climb jungled volcano calderas, and explore the historical allure of this entry point to the sun-gorged island of Gran Canaria. The sprawling capital of the Canaries is Spain's ninth biggest city, stretched out along the sparkling coastline. Visitors and locals alike blow off steam on the city's urban beaches, before filling out bustling, authentic tapas bars. An offshore barrier of lava strips waves of their power, making Las Canteras's urban beach expanse one of the best and calmest in the Canaries. Strap on your snorkel to explore the seabed, which blooms with colourful fish and tropical reefs. Or, settle back to soak in the warm glow of one of the best climates in the world, while reclining on the soft sand, which arcs along the capital's fringe. At the other end of town, La Vegueta old town is a charming stroll along cobbled streets, wandering past decorative doorways and balconies that beg to be photographed. The narrow 15th-century streets take on an extra romantic air in the evenings, as lanterns cast a soft glow over them. Calle Colon offers a hint of the street's history - and it's here where the handsome colonial house - turned museum - of Christopher Columbus stands. Columbus stayed here to recuperate, between his boundary-redefining voyages. Out of Las Palmas, diverse and exciting volcanic landscapes await, including the spectacular Caldera de Bandama, which plunges 200 metres into the earth. From the summit, views stretch out to the looming island of Fuerteventura unravel. You can also discover pretty white-wash fishing villages, dazzling gardens, and the sun-bathed vineyards that produce Gran Canaria's crispest wines.

17 Oct 2021

11

Arrecife, (Lanzarote)

Nestled on the east coast of Lanzarote, Arrecife takes its name from the rocky reefs and outcrops that dominate its coastline. This pretty working city has a friendly, authentic feel, and has managed to remain true to its roots as a historic fishing village. There’s a lot to explore, and whether you want to lie back on long swathes of opulent golden sand, or strap on hiking boots to crunch across Lanzarote’s scorched volcanic scenery, this versatile capital has so much to offer. With castles, caves, sleepy beaches, and a glittering saltwater lagoon, Arrecife is the perfect place to get acquainted with the sun-kissed appeal of the Canary Islands. Lanzarote’s charcoal desert vistas radiate a remarkable luna-like quality, but dotted cacti, waving palms, and bursts of vibrant wildflowers add an accent of colour to the canvas. Arrecife itself boasts apricot-coloured beaches and labyrinthine lanes of white-wash buildings within its Old Quarter, where you can smell fresh fish grilling, and see locals dipping delicious local salty potatoes - papas arrugadas - into colourful sauces. An evening stroll along El Charco de san Gines is a must for watching fishing boats bobbing gently on the lagoon, and watching spectacular sunsets burning across the sky. Standing tall for more than four centuries, Castillo De San Gabriel is located on the tiny island of Islote de los Ingleses, and was once a target for pirates, who would appear menacingly on the Atlantic’s horison. The stalwart 16th-century fortress now serves as the History Museum of Arrecife, and exhibitions inside explore the evolution of the city, and the ancient culture of Lanzarote. The International Museum of Contemporary Art, meanwhile, displays modern and abstract works within the 18th-century San José Castle’s refined setting. See works from Cesar Manrique - the prominent artist and architect whose slick sixties style flair can be admired across the island.

18 Oct 2021

12

At Sea

19 Oct 2021

13

Lisbon

Lisbon, the capital of Portugal, is a city open to the sea and carefully planned with 18th-century elegance. Its founder is said to be the legendary Ulysses, but the theory of an original Phoenician settlement is probably more realistic. Known in Portugal as Lisboa, the city was inhabited by the Romans, Visigoths and, beginning in the 8th century, the Moors. Much of the 16th century was a period of great prosperity and overseas expansion for Portugal. Tragedy struck on All Saints' Day in 1755 with a devastating earthquake that killed about 40,000 people. The destruction of Lisbon shocked the continent. As a result, the Baixa (lower city) emerged in a single phase of building, carried out in less than a decade by the royal minister, the Marques de Pombal. His carefully planned layout of a perfect neo-classical grid survived to this day and remains the heart of the city. Evidence of pre-quake Lisbon can still be seen in the Belém suburb and the old Moorish section of the Alfama that sprawls below the Castle of St. George. Lisbon is a compact city on the banks of the Tagus River. Visitors find it easy to get around as many places of interest are in the vicinity of the central downtown area. There is a convenient bus and tram system and taxis are plentiful. Rossio Square, the heart of Lisbon since medieval times, is an ideal place to start exploring. After a fire destroyed parts of the historic neighborhood behind Rossio in 1988, many of the restored buildings emerged with modern interiors behind the original façades. The city boasts a good many monuments and museums, such as the Jeronimos Monastery, Tower of Belém, the Royal Coach Museum and the Gulbenkian Museum. High above the Baixa is the Bairro Alto (upper city) with its teeming nightlife. The easiest way to connect between the two areas is via the public elevator designed by Gustave Eiffel. Cruising up the Tagus River to the ship's berth, you can already spot three of Lisbon's famous landmarks: the Monument to the Discoveries, the Tower of Belém and the Statue of Christ, which welcomes visitors from its hilltop location high above Europe's longest suspension bridge.

20 Oct 2021

(This holiday is generally suitable for persons with reduced mobility. For customers with reduced mobility or any medical condition that may require special assistance or arrangements to be made, please notify your Cruise Concierge at the time of your enquiry, so that we can provide specific information as to the suitability of the holiday, as well as make suitable arrangements with the Holiday Provider on your behalf).

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