freephone9am - 7pm

0808 202 6105

Silversea logo

Athens to Bordeaux

13th April 2022 FOR 16 NIGHTS | Silver Whisper

Freephone9am - 7pm

0808 202 6105
Loading ...

This fly cruise holiday is financially protected by SILVERSEA under ATOL 4681

Freephone9am - 7pm

0808 202 6105

World Cruise Sector | Includes Business Class flights, overseas transfers and complimentary shore excursions | 10% early booking bonus included - book and pay in full to receive these prices

Check you are ready to travel

Please check that you can meet the conditions below in order to travel on this cruise

1) All guests need to be in possession of a valid UK passport. This is also the case on any British Isles cruises. Please click here to check your passport will still be valid on your dates of travel.

2) Please check your travel insurance meets any criteria as specified by your cruise line. You can check your cruise line requirements here. For a travel insurance quote click here. Proof of travel insurance may be required on boarding.

3) Please check the vaccination and testing requirements from the FCDO, your cruise line and any destination countries here

WHY WE RECOMMEND Mediterranean CRUISES

From historic capital cities to charming coastal towns dotted across a sun-soaked shoreline, there is so much choice when it comes to picking your perfect Mediterranean cruise itinerary. Take your pick from a host of voyages taking in the Western Mediterranean across Spain, Portugal and the French Riviera, or the Eastern Mediterranean including Italy, Greece and Croatia.

Whichever side of the Mediterranean you decide to explore, from the enchanting east to the legendary west - or even both - you will experience the warm climate, captivating culture and fascinating history for which the region is renowned. A Mediterranean cruise offers the opportunity to explore a different city every day - enjoying famous museums, pavement cafes and stunning scenery as you go. Why not book a Cruise and Stay holiday and extend your stay in a city such as Barcelona?

Mediterranean cruises are most popular during the summer months of June, July and August. The hot weather and warm sea make this the ideal time to visit the coastal town and cities. The spring and autumn are also good times to cruise, particularly if you wish to avoid the hustle and bustle of the summer season.

what's included on-board?

Loading...

itinerary

1

Athens (Piraeus), Greece

A city of legend, civilisation and enduring culture, Athens is a majestic and magical urban sprawl. Extraordinary elegance and grace combine with grit and graft in Greece's capital, where highways encase ruins from antiquity, and gleaming museums and galleries stand beside concrete sprayed with edgy street art. These contrasts enhance and elevate the wonders of this 2,500-year-old city, however, which can count notable contributions to philosophy, drama and democracy, among its global legacy. Piraeus' giant port and naval base welcome you to the edge of the Athens' urban area. From there it's a simple jaunt to the centre. The majestic ancient citadel of the Acropolis dominates an elevated platform and is a constant presence as you explore the city. The wonderful remains of the columned temple of the Parthenon - which date back to the 5th century BC - stand here, representing the pinnacle of classical architecture. The nearby Acropolis Museum adds context to your visit and frames the broad views from its giant glass windows. Or rise up Mount Lycabettus, to be rewarded with perhaps Athens' best panorama of the Acropolis sitting high over the city on its grand stage. See the marble horseshoe of the Old Olympic Stadium, where the first modern Olympics were held in 1896, for more of the city's enduring legacy. Elsewhere, golden beaches and temples stretch out along the coastline, should you wish to explore a little further afield. Coffee is an art form to the Greeks, and it's an unwritten rule that coffee time must never be rushed. So prepare to settle down for a couple of hours and lose yourself in a good chat. Feeling hungry - try traditional souvlaki made with sauces handed from generation to generation.

13 Apr 2022

2

At Sea

14 Apr 2022

3

Siracusa

Honey-coloured Siracusa is a staggering UNESCO World Heritage Site, and an extraordinary Sicilian city of immense ancient history. The modern population is a fraction of what it was at the city’s heyday around 400 BC, when Athens’ might was successfully challenged and faced down, reinforcing the city’s incredible power and status. Siracusa’s historical nucleus waits to be discovered on the compact islet of Ortygia. The city was founded here, but grew over time, spreading across to the mainland. View less A small channel separates the two, which is now spanned by twin bridges. Wander the atmospheric streets of this time warp, to reach the shining elegance of Piazza Duomo. The Baroque cathedral rises like a giant sandcastle, and you can settle opposite to cradle a glass of wine and enjoy the view over the immaculate square - people watching before the glorious baroque façade. Dig deep into its history at the mainland's archaeological park. Here you can wander between the remains of a Greek theatre, constructed in the 5th century BC, and now used as a grandiose, atmospheric venue for events and performances. You’ll also encounter a Roman Amphitheatre - where gladiators battled brutally, and the spectacular ear-shaped cave, which is famed for its extraordinary, secret-revealing acoustics. It was given its name - the Ear of Dionysius - by Caravaggio. Visit the legendary Fonte Arethusa, or lose yourself in the Ortygia Market – you’ll find everything here, from fresh fish, to spices and local bottles of wines. Look out for a flavour-filled jar of real Sicilian u strattu - an intense tomato paste that is the secret ingredient to many Sicilian recipes. The local ingredients are imbued with flavour by this volcanic land’s fertile soils and the firepower of Europe’s most active volcano Mount Etna, waits just to the north.

15 Apr 2022

4

Valletta, Malta

Perched high on the imposing Sciberras Peninsula, Valletta immediately presents its massive, protective walls and vertical bastions to visitors arriving by sea. Rising to 47 metres in places, the fortifications protect lavish palaces, grand domes and illustrious gardens. Built by the Knights of St John on the narrow peninsular, Valletta is a compact, richly historical treasure trove of Baroque wonders. Ascend to reach the restful, flower-filled Upper Barrakka Gardens, where cannons fire and boom in salute at noon each day, sending echoing cracks of noise out across the waves below. View less Recognised as 2018’s European Capital of Culture, Valletta is a fascinating and dense haven of history and intrigue. A busy, bustling capital, the breathtaking St John’s Cathedral - commissioned in 1572 - is almost concealed among its narrow streets. The relatively modest exterior is counterpointed by a staggeringly opulent, gold-leaf bathed interior, containing a Caravaggio masterpiece - the shadowy vision of the Beheading of St John. Cinematic and magnificent, Valletta has served as a filming location for Game of Thrones - but real epic history abounds on this rocky isle too. From the prehistoric and megalithic sites of the Hypogeum of Paola and Tarxien, to the fascinating War Museum at Fort St Elmo. Mdina also waits nearby, and the former medieval capital is a striking contrast to the island’s main city. Cars are barred from its streets, and it offers endlessly atmospheric old-time wanders. With a strategic positioning in the Mediterranean, Malta is a jewel that many have wrestled for over the centuries. Independence from Britain was finally achieved in 1964, but the close allegiance remains evident, with English recognised as an official language, cars driving on the left, and red post boxes and telephone gleaming in Malta’s sunshine.

16 Apr 2022

5
6

At Sea

17 Apr 2022 - 18 Apr 2022

7

Malaga

Bathing in the sunshine coast’s stunning subtropical climate, and laying out endless spectacular beaches, it’s no surprise that Malaga is one of Spain’s most popular cities. The already impressive cultural appeal of this holiday city has skyrocketed over recent years, and with a storied old town and Moorish fortifications, Malaga has a lot to offer. Nearby, you can recline on the renowned beaches of the Costa del Sol, or venture inland to discover the Moorish treasures of Granada and Cordoba. View less La Malagueta beach is Malaga’s spacious urban beach, perfect for a sunbathe and a dip in the warm water, before enjoying seaside cocktails or seafood tapas in the restaurants nearby. Malaga and the Costa del Sol may be best known for glorious weather and beaches, but Malaga can now stake a genuine claim as an artistic powerhouse too. Visit the renowned Picasso museum – housed in the artist’s birthplace – before exploring the freshly opened outpost of the Pompidou Centre. The art also spills out onto the streets in the colourful Soho district – splashed with vibrant street paintings. Known as La Manquita – or the one-armed woman – the city’s cathedral rises over the historic old town. Its huge bell tower stands tall, but an accompanying second tower was never completed - hence the nickname. The Alcazaba fortress palace looms over the waterfront and forms a spectacularly preserved remnant from the era when the Moors controlled the Andalucía region. Discover more of the Arabic influence by visiting Granada’s Alhambra palace, or Cordoba’s La Mezquita mosque. Together with Seville’s converted cathedral, the cities form Andalucía’s Golden Triangle of Moorish wonders.

19 Apr 2022

8

Tangier

Set on the Maghreb coast, Tangier is Africa’s outstretched hand to Europe. With its bustling markets and lively waterfront, this city on Morroco's north is an energetic and invigorating place and an exciting immersion into an incredible continent. The location, on the highly strategic narrowing of the Strait of Gibraltar, made Tangier a vital Phoenician trading town - and the resulting city is an invigorating mesh of cultures and curiosities. View less Part of the fun of Tangier is the well-rehearsed dance, as you dodge good-natured hawkers, and this is certainly a place to stroll with confidence and purpose. Delve into the mayhem of the walled Medina of Tangier for a rush of stimulation, as bartering and bantering echoes along the tight alleys. Crowded, noisy and busy, you’ll be sold to with a smile as you wander between stands of colourful spices, dried fruits and fabrics in this authentic Moroccan marketplace. Refresh and escape the sun with a fresh orange juice - or a sip of mint tea. Close to the city, you can find the Caves of Hercules, a coastal hollow that opens at both ends. The Phoenicians cut a window in the shape of the African continent, which reveals views of the Atlantic's waves, and legend says Hercules rested within its confines. From Tangier, you can also venture inland to the Rif Mountains, where gorgeous Chefchaouen - a village of bright blue alleyways - waits. Punctuated by blooming flowers, the entire town is a beautiful, moulded artwork of colour, spilling down the mountain like a waterfall.

20 Apr 2022

9
10

Seville

Whether you pronounce it Seville or Sevilla, this gorgeous Spanish town is most certainly the stuff of dreams. Over 2,200 years old, Seville has a mutli-layered personality; home to Flamenco, high temperatures and three UNESCO-World Heritage Sites, there is a noble ancestry to the southern Spanish town. Not forgetting that it is the birthplace of painter Diego Velazquez, the resting place of Christopher Columbus, the inspiration for Bizet’s Carmen and a location for Game of Thrones filming, Seville is truly more than just a sum of its parts. View less This city is a full on experience, a beguiling labyrinth of centuries old streets, tiny tapas restaurants serving possibly the best dishes you’ll taste south of Madrid and a paradise of Mudejar architecture and tranquil palm trees and fountain-filled gardens.

21 Apr 2022 - 22 Apr 2022

11
12

Lisbon

Lisbon, the capital of Portugal, is a city open to the sea and carefully planned with 18th-century elegance. Its founder is said to be the legendary Ulysses, but the theory of an original Phoenician settlement is probably more realistic. Known in Portugal as Lisboa, the city was inhabited by the Romans, Visigoths and, beginning in the 8th century, the Moors. Much of the 16th century was a period of great prosperity and overseas expansion for Portugal. Tragedy struck on All Saints' Day in 1755 with a devastating earthquake that killed about 40,000 people. The destruction of Lisbon shocked the continent. As a result, the Baixa (lower city) emerged in a single phase of building, carried out in less than a decade by the royal minister, the Marques de Pombal. His carefully planned layout of a perfect neo-classical grid survived to this day and remains the heart of the city. Evidence of pre-quake Lisbon can still be seen in the Belém suburb and the old Moorish section of the Alfama that sprawls below the Castle of St. George. Lisbon is a compact city on the banks of the Tagus River. Visitors find it easy to get around as many places of interest are in the vicinity of the central downtown area. There is a convenient bus and tram system and taxis are plentiful. Rossio Square, the heart of Lisbon since medieval times, is an ideal place to start exploring. After a fire destroyed parts of the historic neighborhood behind Rossio in 1988, many of the restored buildings emerged with modern interiors behind the original façades. The city boasts a good many monuments and museums, such as the Jeronimos Monastery, Tower of Belém, the Royal Coach Museum and the Gulbenkian Museum. High above the Baixa is the Bairro Alto (upper city) with its teeming nightlife. The easiest way to connect between the two areas is via the public elevator designed by Gustave Eiffel. Cruising up the Tagus River to the ship's berth, you can already spot three of Lisbon's famous landmarks: the Monument to the Discoveries, the Tower of Belém and the Statue of Christ, which welcomes visitors from its hilltop location high above Europe's longest suspension bridge.

23 Apr 2022 - 24 Apr 2022

13

Oporto (Leixoes), Portugal

Lively, commercial Oporto is the second largest city in Portugal after Lisbon. Also called Porto for short, the word easily brings to mind the city's most famous product - port wine. Oporto’s strategic location on the north bank of the Douro River has accounted for the town’s importance since ancient times. The Romans built a fort here where their trading route crossed the Douro, and the Moors brought their own culture to the area. Oporto profited from provisioning crusaders en route to the Holy Land and enjoyed the riches from Portuguese maritime discoveries during the 15th and 16th centuries.

25 Apr 2022

14

La Coruna, Spain

La Coruña, the largest city in Spain's Galicia region, is among the country's busiest ports. The remote Galicia area is tucked into the northwest corner of the Iberian Peninsula, surprising visitors with its green and misty countryside that is so much unlike other parts of Spain. The name "Galicia" is Celtic in origin, for it was the Celts who occupied the region around the 6th century BC and erected fortifications. La Coruña was already considered an important port under the Romans. They were followed by an invasion of Suevians, Visigoths and, much later in 730, the Moors. It was after Galicia was incorporated into the Kingdom of Asturias that the epic saga of the Pilgrimage to Santiago (St. James) began. From the 15th century, overseas trade developed rapidly; in 1720, La Coruña was granted the privilege of trading with America - a right previously only held by Cadiz and Seville. This was the great era when adventurous men voyaged to the colonies and returned with vast riches. Today, the city's significant expansion is evident in three distinct quarters: the town center located along the isthmus; the business and commercial center with wide avenues and shopping streets; and the "Ensanche" to the south, occupied by warehouses and factories. Many of the buildings in the old section feature the characteristic glazed façades that have earned La Coruña the name "City of Crystals." Plaza Maria Pita, the beautiful main square, is named after the local heroine who saved the town in 1589 when she seized the English standard from the beacon and gave the alarm, warning her fellow townsmen of the English attack.

26 Apr 2022

15

Bilbao, Spain

Whether it’s the flow of its boundary pushing architecture, delights of its finger food tapas, or sweeps of gorgeous shoreline nearby, Bilbao is a city that places a premium on aesthetics. The relentless drive to all things beautiful may be a reaction to the city’s industrial past, but it has led this Basque city to emerge as a new beacon of artistry. American architect Frank Gehry’s masterpiece of flowing metal is the shining standout here, a perfect harmony of smooth titanium and glass, and a thrilling piece in itself. Inside the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, world-class exhibitions are exhibited in the bright, expansive interior - which practically begs you to explore more. The city has gorgeous historical presence too. Casco Viejo - the medieval area - is its historic core, and home to the original seven streets and cathedral, dating back to the 14thcentury. Tall banks of coloured buildings rise either side as you walk, dwarfed by a tide of pretty facades, overflowing flower boxes, and intricate rail balconies. Plaza Nueva is Bilbao’s neoclassical square, with a procession of arches all around you. Morning flea markets regularly overtake it, offering opportunities to pick through piles of coins, dusty books and rusted antiques on the hunt for bargains, in this most elegant setting. The titanic Mercado de la Ribera market looms tall by the river. Explore to eat your way through an endless pile of Basque pintxos – the local take on tapas. Cocktail sticks will quickly stack up as you gorge on plump olives, organic cheeses, and feather thin slices of curled hams, while orbiting Europe’s largest covered market. Described as a perfect blend of beauty and function by UNESCO, the Vizcaya Bridge is an unusual but spectacular piece of industrial architecture. The world’s oldest, gigantic transporter crane is still in use today, swinging cars and passengers from one side of the gaping Nervion River’s mouth to the other.

27 Apr 2022

16
17

Bordeaux, France

The name alone conjures images of sun-ripened grapes, splashes of refined flavour, and the joy of clinking glasses. Bordeaux is synonymous with quality and prestige, and the promise of endless opportunities to sample the city’s famous, full-bodied red wines makes a visit to this elegant French port city one to truly savour. Sprinkled with scenic, turret-adorned mansion castles, which stand above soil softened by the Atlantic and winding flow of the Garonne River, the vineyards of Bordeaux consistently produce revered wines, enjoyed right across the globe. Explore France’s largest wine region, walking through vineyards where dusty clumps of grapes hang, before descending into cellars to see the painstaking processes that make this region a global wine centre. The acclaimed, sensory experience of Cité du Vin wine museum lets you put your own nose to the test, learning more about the craft involved in producing world class vintages. Brush up on your wine knowledge, with our blog [insert You’ll Fall in Love with Wine in Bordeaux]. Bordeaux itself is an intoxicating blend of old and new – a fact perfectly illustrated by the Water Mirror. This living art installation has reinvigorated one of the city’s most important historical sites, and it feels as though you’re walking on water, as you step through the cooling mist of Place De La Bourse. The moisture generates a glorious mirrored composition of the 300-year-old elegant palatial architecture in front of you. Water also flows freely from the magnificent Monument aux Girondins statue, where horses rear up to extol the values of the Girondin revolutionaries. Marche des Quais – the city’s lively fish market – is the spot to try this wine capital’s freshest lemon-drizzled oysters and juicy prawns.

28 Apr 2022 - 29 Apr 2022

(This holiday is generally suitable for persons with reduced mobility. For customers with reduced mobility or any medical condition that may require special assistance or arrangements to be made, please notify your Cruise Concierge at the time of your enquiry, so that we can provide specific information as to the suitability of the holiday, as well as make suitable arrangements with the Holiday Provider on your behalf).

ACCOMMODATION

Alternative sailing dates

Flexible with departure dates? Alternative sailing dates for this itinerary are available in the list below

most popular sailings

read advice from our cruise experts

Our Award-Winning Service

explore

  • about us
  • contact us
  • news
  • advice
  • privacy policy
  • terms of use
  • how to pay
  • careers

sign up for exclusive offers

© 2021 SixStarCruises

follow us

This website will provide you with information on the financial protection that applies in the case of each holiday and travel service offered before you make your booking. At the time of booking, our Cruise Concierge will also confirm the financial protection applicable to your specific holiday. Please ask us for further information should you require it. The flight inclusive holidays on this website are financially protected by the ATOL scheme. But ATOL protection does not apply to all holiday and travel services listed on this website. If you do not receive an ATOL Certificate then the booking will not be ATOL protected. If you do receive an ATOL Certificate but all parts of your trip are not listed on it, those parts will not be ATOL protected. The cruise-only holidays on this website are financially protected by ABTA. Please see our booking terms and conditions for further information or for more information about financial protection and the ATOL Certificate, click here. SixStarCruises acts as a retail agent to you and also as a disclosed agent of the holiday provider (the Organiser of the holiday).