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Lisbon To Civitavecchia (Rome)

5th November 2021 FOR 10 NIGHTS | Silver Shadow

Freephone10am - 5pm

0808 202 6105
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This fly cruise holiday is financially protected by SILVERSEA under ATOL 4681

Freephone10am - 5pm

0808 202 6105

EXCLUSIVE OFFER | $300 FREE to spend on-board per couple | Includes 10% early booking bonus - book and pay in full to receive these prices | Includes Business Class flights and overseas transfers

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Please check that you can meet the conditions below in order to travel on this cruise

1) All guests need to be in possession of a valid UK passport. This is also the case on any British Isles cruises. Please click here to check your passport will still be valid on your dates of travel.

2) Please check your travel insurance meets any criteria as specified by your cruise line. You can check your cruise line requirements here. For a travel insurance quote click here. Proof of travel insurance may be required on boarding.

3) Please check the vaccination and testing requirements from the FCDO, your cruise line and any destination countries here

WHY WE RECOMMEND Europe CRUISES

On a European cruise, you could discover the Gallic charm of the Channel Islands, experience Ireland's ancient sights and welcoming towns, or see the misty highlands and rich clan heritage along Scotland's rugged coast. Cross the North Sea to Iceland on your cruise and you'll find one of the world’s most unique and secluded landscapes – a land of volcanoes, thermal springs, geysers and boiling lakes.

Alternatively, you could tour beautiful cities and rolling countryside on cruises to France, Belgium and Holland, or see Portugal's striking city ports and Spain's milder northern coast. Further afield you could visit the beautiful Canary Islands too, where clear seas wash against bright white beaches – the perfect place to relax in style on a luxury trip ashore.

Europe is one of the world's most popular continents for cruise holidays and is home to an incredible collection of iconic cities, each brimming with a fascinating heritage, vibrant cultures and plenty of intriguing sightseeing opportunities. Every destination on a European cruise itinerary will boast a long and interesting past, with plenty of cultural experiences and ancient landmarks on offer to showcase this rich history.

On a luxury European voyage, travellers will have the opportunity to head ashore and explore on their own, or enjoy one of many exciting shore excursions offered by their cruise line, providing the perfect chance to delve into the sights and sounds of each destination they visit and discover even more in port.

Take a look at the fantastic range of luxury European itineraries available to book now at SixStarCruises™, with the world's finest luxury cruise lines. Once you've found your ideal voyage, call our expert Cruise Concierge team to secure your place on-board and start looking forward to an unforgettable escape across this diverse and captivating continent.

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itinerary

1

Lisbon

Lisbon, the capital of Portugal, is a city open to the sea and carefully planned with 18th-century elegance. Its founder is said to be the legendary Ulysses, but the theory of an original Phoenician settlement is probably more realistic. Known in Portugal as Lisboa, the city was inhabited by the Romans, Visigoths and, beginning in the 8th century, the Moors. Much of the 16th century was a period of great prosperity and overseas expansion for Portugal. Tragedy struck on All Saints' Day in 1755 with a devastating earthquake that killed about 40,000 people. The destruction of Lisbon shocked the continent. As a result, the Baixa (lower city) emerged in a single phase of building, carried out in less than a decade by the royal minister, the Marques de Pombal. His carefully planned layout of a perfect neo-classical grid survived to this day and remains the heart of the city. Evidence of pre-quake Lisbon can still be seen in the Belém suburb and the old Moorish section of the Alfama that sprawls below the Castle of St. George. Lisbon is a compact city on the banks of the Tagus River. Visitors find it easy to get around as many places of interest are in the vicinity of the central downtown area. There is a convenient bus and tram system and taxis are plentiful. Rossio Square, the heart of Lisbon since medieval times, is an ideal place to start exploring. After a fire destroyed parts of the historic neighborhood behind Rossio in 1988, many of the restored buildings emerged with modern interiors behind the original façades. The city boasts a good many monuments and museums, such as the Jeronimos Monastery, Tower of Belém, the Royal Coach Museum and the Gulbenkian Museum. High above the Baixa is the Bairro Alto (upper city) with its teeming nightlife. The easiest way to connect between the two areas is via the public elevator designed by Gustave Eiffel. Cruising up the Tagus River to the ship's berth, you can already spot three of Lisbon's famous landmarks: the Monument to the Discoveries, the Tower of Belém and the Statue of Christ, which welcomes visitors from its hilltop location high above Europe's longest suspension bridge.

05 Nov 2021

2

At Sea

06 Nov 2021

3
4

Cadiz (Seville)

Whether you pronounce it Seville or Sevilla, this gorgeous Spanish town is most certainly the stuff of dreams. Over 2,200 years old, Seville has a mutli-layered personality; home to Flamenco, high temperatures and three UNESCO-World Heritage Sites, there is a noble ancestry to the southern Spanish town. Not forgetting that it is the birthplace of painter Diego Velazquez, the resting place of Christopher Columbus, the inspiration for Bizet’s Carmen and a location for Game of Thrones filming, Seville is truly more than just a sum of its parts. View less This city is a full on experience, a beguiling labyrinth of centuries old streets, tiny tapas restaurants serving possibly the best dishes you’ll taste south of Madrid and a paradise of Mudejar architecture and tranquil palm trees and fountain-filled gardens.

07 Nov 2021 - 08 Nov 2021

5

Seville (Cadiz)

More than a hundred watchtowers gaze out across the waves surrounding this ancient Andalusian city. Sprinkled with evocative cobbled side streets, you’ll explore 3,000 years’ worth of history, while stumbling across palm-tree lined plazas of shaded coffee sippers. Cadiz claims the mantle of Western Europe’s oldest city, and every piece of architecture - and every wrong turn - offers a chance to discover fascinating new tales. Founded by the Phoenicians in 1100BC, Christopher Columbus used the city as a base for his exploratory, map-defining voyages of 1493 and 1502. The port grew in importance and wealth as Cadiz’s strategic location close to Africa’s northern tip helped it blossom into a centre for New World trade. Catedral de Cádiz, is a display of the city’s wealth and importance, looming spectacularly over the Atlantic’s waves, with cawing seagulls sweeping between its twin bell towers. Inside, treasures from the city’s trading exploits in the West Indies and beyond - which helped fuel the growth of this historically prosperous city – are on display. Enveloped by ocean on almost every side, Cadiz has something of an island feel, and you can cool off from southern Spain’s unrelenting sunshine on the sweeping golden sand beach of Playa Victoria. The two towers of the new El Puente de la Constitución de 1812 mark a contemporary landmark in this most ancient of cities, in the form of a spectacular new road bridge. Torre Tavira, meanwhile, is the most famous of Cadiz’s army of watchtowers, and the highest point in the city. Reach the top for a view of the ocean fringing the city’s expanse, and to learn about the towers - constructed so trading merchants could survey the harbour from their lavish homes. The Central Market is a chaotic place of bartering, where flashing knives dissect fresh fish. Stop in at the orbiting bars to enjoy tapas, freshly prepared with the market’s produce.

09 Nov 2021

6

Malaga

Bathing in the sunshine coast’s stunning subtropical climate, and laying out endless spectacular beaches, it’s no surprise that Malaga is one of Spain’s most popular cities. The already impressive cultural appeal of this holiday city has skyrocketed over recent years, and with a storied old town and Moorish fortifications, Malaga has a lot to offer. Nearby, you can recline on the renowned beaches of the Costa del Sol, or venture inland to discover the Moorish treasures of Granada and Cordoba. View less La Malagueta beach is Malaga’s spacious urban beach, perfect for a sunbathe and a dip in the warm water, before enjoying seaside cocktails or seafood tapas in the restaurants nearby. Malaga and the Costa del Sol may be best known for glorious weather and beaches, but Malaga can now stake a genuine claim as an artistic powerhouse too. Visit the renowned Picasso museum – housed in the artist’s birthplace – before exploring the freshly opened outpost of the Pompidou Centre. The art also spills out onto the streets in the colourful Soho district – splashed with vibrant street paintings. Known as La Manquita – or the one-armed woman – the city’s cathedral rises over the historic old town. Its huge bell tower stands tall, but an accompanying second tower was never completed - hence the nickname. The Alcazaba fortress palace looms over the waterfront and forms a spectacularly preserved remnant from the era when the Moors controlled the Andalucía region. Discover more of the Arabic influence by visiting Granada’s Alhambra palace, or Cordoba’s La Mezquita mosque. Together with Seville’s converted cathedral, the cities form Andalucía’s Golden Triangle of Moorish wonders.

10 Nov 2021

7

Cartagena, Spain

On the crossroads of mighty cultures, this Murcian port has endless ancient stories to share. A valuable natural harbour attracted many civilisations to this sun-bathed, southeasterly setting - following its foundation by the Carthaginians in 227 BC. Blending the imprints left by countless cultures on this global junction, the presence of everyone from the Vandals to the Phoenicians and Moors can be felt as you explore, walking between ruins and celebrated modernist architecture along Calle Mayor. Cartagena is crowned by the soaring Castillo de la Concepcion - rise to the stout castle aboard a panoramic lift. Inside, look through reams of archaeological treasures, or admire the rolling views down over the port and across the waters. Watch out for the electric blue peacocks who strut flamboyantly. Cartagena's emergence as a visitor destination coincided with a stunning discovery in 1988 - the bowl of a gloriously preserved Roman Theatre. Enter to sit among the grandiose ancient venue, so evocative, you can't help but imagine the historic performances that have graced its stage. Wander the breezy waterfront, looking across the narrow strait towards Africa's distant haze, and spotting gleaming warships. Cartagena's perfect harbour means it has been one of Spain's oldest strategic navy positions since the 16th century. Settle to enjoy the joys of tapas in lively bars - sampling crisped paella, squid and honeyed-aubergine. Easter's Semana Santa festivities are typically lively here, as hooded processions, lavish floats and sombre fiery displays roll through the streets.

11 Nov 2021

8

At Sea

12 Nov 2021

9

Palermo, Sicily

The capital of Sicily is situated on a crescent-shaped bay on the island's north coast. Once the intellectual capital of southern Europe, Palermo has always been at the crossroads of civilization. Due to its favourable location, Sicily's most interesting city has attracted almost every people and culture touching the Mediterranean world. Its most unique characteristic is a harmonious blend of Arab-Norman cultures mixed with Byzantine and Jewish elements, which created some unforgettable and resplendent works of art. Phoenician traders first colonized Palermo in the 6th-century BC, but it was the Carthaginians, who built the important fortress here that caught the covetous eye of the Romans. After the first Punic War, the Romans took control of the city in the 3rd-century BC. Following several invasions by the Vandals, Sicily was settled by Arabs, who made the country an emirate and Palermo a showpiece capital that rivalled in splendour both Cordoba and Cairo. The city became a magical place of palaces and mosques, minarets and palm trees. In the 11th-century Palermo was conquered by the Norman ruler, Roger de Hauteville. During the Normans' hundred-year occupation, the city experienced a remarkable period of enlightenment and a flourishing of the arts. Counting a population of more than 300,000, Palermo became the centre of Norman rule and one of the most important trading centres between East and West. Eventually, Palermo was incorporated into the “Kingdom of the Two Sicilies” under the Swabian ruler Frederick II, known as the Holy Roman Emperor. After the bloody Sicilian Vespers uprising in 1282, the Spanish took control and brought the Inquisition to Palermo. Some historians believe that the nature of the Inquisition helped foster the protective secret societies that eventually evolved into the Mafia. Today, visitors can still experience the legacy of Palermo's rich past. Great Arab-Norman buildings include the Cappella Palatina, La Martorana, San Giovanni degli Eremiti and, a few miles outside the city, the Cathedral of Monreale. Palermo's bustling streets and animated markets give the town an Oriental feel. The Quattro Canti, or Four Corners, is the monumental crossroads laid out in 1608-1620 at the central intersection of the four longest and straightest streets of the city. North of Piazza Castelnuovo lie the avenues of the new city. Most sights are scattered along three major streets: Corso Vittorio Emanuele, Via Maqueda and Via Roma. A vigorous metropolis with a strong historical profile, Palermo is packed with interesting sights, which make it an enriching and enjoyable place to explore.

13 Nov 2021

10

Naples

The region of Campania was home to Greeks settlers some 300 years before Rome was founded. Pompeii, too, was a Greek town before being conquered by the Romans during the 5th century BC. It was under the Romans that Pompeii flourished and grew prosperous. When Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79 AD, the population of 20,000 was wiped out, but dozens of buildings were preserved under layers of cinder more than 20 feet deep. The most important finds from Pompeii are displayed in Naples' National Archaeological Museum. A visit here will no doubt enhance a visit to ancient Pompeii.

14 Nov 2021

11

Rome (Civitavecchia), Italy

All roads lead to Rome, and with good reason - this city is one of the world’s most thrilling, offering unmatched history along every street. An evocative, inspiring and utterly artistic capital of unrivalled cultural impact, Rome is a city of back-to-back landmarks, which will take you on an exhilarating journey through the ages. This may be one of the world’s oldest cities, but it’s well and truly lived in. The ruins are punctuated with murmuring cafes, and the outdoor seating of restaurants sprawls out across piazzas, enticing you to sample tangles of creamy pasta and crispy pizzas. Rome’s incredible Roman Forum is littered with the ruins of its ancient administrations, which have stood firm for 2,000 years, since the times when the area was the centre of the Western world. Few sites are more simultaneously beautiful and haunting than that of the storied Colosseum, which looms deep into Rome’s rich blue sky. Take a tour to learn details of the grisly goings-on within. The best way to experience Rome is to wander its streets, gelato in hand. There is a lot to see here - whether it’s the domed spectacle of the Pantheon, or the elaborate flowing waters and artistry of the Trevi Fountain. Vatican City is an astonishing, colossal display of Catholic grandeur, while the Spanish Steps – crowned by the Trinità dei Monti church – offer a beautiful spot to gather and soak up the lively atmosphere of this humming city. With so much on the to-do list, you’ll relish the breaks you take, enjoying simple pleasures like a strong espresso, or fresh pasta with tomato sauce and ripped basil.

15 Nov 2021

(This holiday is generally suitable for persons with reduced mobility. For customers with reduced mobility or any medical condition that may require special assistance or arrangements to be made, please notify your Cruise Concierge at the time of your enquiry, so that we can provide specific information as to the suitability of the holiday, as well as make suitable arrangements with the Holiday Provider on your behalf).

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