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Reykjavík To Reykjavík

5th July 2022 FOR 10 NIGHTS | Silver Whisper

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This fly cruise holiday is financially protected by SILVERSEA under ATOL 4681

Freephone9am - 6pm

0808 202 6105

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Save 20%! | Includes private door-to-door transfers, Business Class flights, overseas transfers and complimentary shore excursions | Includes 20% early booking bonus - pay in full to receive these prices

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Please check that you can meet the conditions below in order to travel on this cruise

1) All guests need to be in possession of a valid UK passport. This is also the case on any British Isles cruises. Please click here to check your passport will still be valid on your dates of travel.

2) Please check your travel insurance meets any criteria as specified by your cruise line. You can check your cruise line requirements here. For a travel insurance quote click here. Proof of travel insurance may be required on boarding.

3) Please check the vaccination and testing requirements from the FCDO, your cruise line and any destination countries here

WHY WE RECOMMEND Scandinavia CRUISES

A world away from the sunny Mediterranean and the Caribbean’s white sandy beaches, cruises around the polar regions offer an entirely different adventure.

You could head up into the Arctic Circle during a cruise around the fjords or the Baltic capitals; or sail south from the far tip of Argentina towards the surreal frozen landscapes of Antarctica. Since these are luxury cruises, you could spend your days at sea in a hot whirlpool out on deck, glass of wine in hand – or head ashore on an expedition, learning more about these remote ecosystems with the help of expert guides.

Cruises in the Arctic tend to offer more choice in the warmer summer months, with some voyages available from England and Scotland or even Miami. Set sail from Greenland out of ports like Kangerlussuaq, and you could embark on a tour of Canada and Alaska’s most spectacular destinations like the Smoking Hills, the Yukon Territory and the snow-covered town of Barrow. Equally popular are cruises of the fjords, which focus on Norway’s beautiful ocean inlets and the dramatic mountain landscapes that tower over remote fishing villages beneath.

A luxury cruise is also the perfect way to explore Antarctica, with a wide choice of itineraries available from Ushuaia in Argentina to the rocky shores of Neko, the alien ice structures of Pleneau Island and the striking, rugged landscape of Port Lockroy and its penguin colonies.

With the poles covering such vast distances, and with many ports here often being remote and far-flung, there are countless different ways to see Antarctica or the Arctic Circle on a variety of routes. Call our Cruise Concierge team for friendly, professional travel advice – and let them find and tailor your luxury voyage from among the best cruises in the polar regions.

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itinerary

1

Reykjavík00:00 - 21:00

Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.

05 Jul 2022

2

Patreksfjørdur08:00 - 18:00

Sitting in the finger-like scenery of the Westfjords - which flays out from the mainland to form one of Europe’s most westerly points, Patreksfjordur has barely 700 inhabitants and - like so many Icelandic communities - is built on time-tested fishing traditions. Discover wonderful crowds of birdlife clinging to the dramatic cliffs, as you embark on adventures amid the Westfjords, discovering flat-topped mountains, cutting inlets and evocative, windswept beaches. View less With their bright beaks and amiable features, puffins are some of the most beautiful birds in the world - and they nest in huge quantities on Látrabjarg cliff, close to Patreksfjordur. Vertically steep and imposing, the birds are safe from predators like foxes here, as they live and breed on the dramatically steep drop-offs. Wander to see them thriving in their natural habitat, clinging to cliff ledges. You can also encounter gannets and guillemots, as well as an estimated 40% of the world’s Razorbill population. Rauðasandur beach is one of Iceland’s more unusual sights, a huge copper-red stretch of sand. Wander the dreamy shoreline, and photograph the remote, colourful collision of sea and sand. You’re also close to the majestic veil of Dynjandi waterfall, which fans out across 60 metres as it descends. After a tough day’s hiking, return to Patreksfjordur to admire fjord views and soak your muscles in an outdoor pool, as the stars begin to appear above. Or head to the muscle-relieving, naturally-heated, geothermal pools that murmur nearby.

06 Jul 2022

3

Siglufjørdur - høfn08:00 - 23:00

A tiny town in the scenic north of Iceland, cosseted away by a jagged wall of mountain peaks, Siglufjordur is an isolated gem. With just over a thousand residents, Siglufjordur takes its name from the glassy fjord that stretches out nearby. Iceland's northernmost town, only a single-lane road tunnel, bored through the snow-capped mountains, provides a land link with the rest of the country. This evocative remoteness appealed to dark Nordic Noir writers - and the town has found recent fame as the star of the TV show Trapped. View less A much warmer welcome awaits you in real life than in fiction - fortunately. Siglufjordur is a historic Atlantic capital of herring fishing, and you can learn of the industry that gave the town its raison d'etre, and powered Iceland's economy at the award-winning Herring Era Museum. The biggest maritime-themed museum in Iceland, it spreads across three buildings and covers every element of the town's relationship with its fishing waters - from expedition to preparation and preservation. While the industry has dried up since its heyday, wander to the harbour for views of the pretty town's cherry and lemon coloured former warehouses. Swirling seagulls look for offcuts, while fishermen sandpaper and varnish tiny vessels. Take a boat out around the scenic fjord, or embark on lengthy hikes out and above this romantically isolated outpost. The sounds of beautiful duo vocal harmonies and accordions are often heard echoing along the streets, and the Folk Music Museum is an enchanting look into quaint, rural Icelandic culture. The Folk Music Festival causes the town's population to swell dramatically, as visitors make for these picturesque shores to play and perform each year.

07 Jul 2022

4

Akureyri08:00 - 22:00

Akureyri, called the Capital of the North is the second largest urban area in Iceland, and a lively one at that. Hemmed by the 60-km (37-mile) long Eyjafjörður, Akureyri is sheltered from the ocean winds and embraced by mountains on three sides. Late 19th-century wooden houses impart a sense of history, and the twin spires of a modern Lutheran church rising on a green hill near the waterfront, provide a focal point. To the south of Akureyri is the pyramid-shape rhyolite mountain Súlur. Beyond it is Kerling, the highest peak in Eyjafjörður District.

08 Jul 2022

5

Husavik07:00 - 18:00

The town of Húsavík sits below Húsavíkurfjall mountain on the eastern shore of Skjálfandi bay. Just above the town is lake Botnsvatn, a popular place for outings. The lake is just the right size for a nice hike around it. The lakes surroundings are rich in vegetation and bird life and trout is said to be abundant, though small. Húsavík harbour lies below the bank right in the heart of town. The harbour once boasted a large fishing fleet, bustling with the activity of fishermen. It still serves as a fishing harbour but today's activity revolves more around the successful whale watching businesses. The first organised whale watching excursions in Iceland started from here in 1995. Since then, whale watching has become a major attraction and Húsavík continues to be the leading destination for whale watching. In addition to the tours, a fascinating whale museum is located right by the harbour. Húsavík is considered to be the oldest settlement in Iceland. The Swedish explorer, Gardar Svavarsson, spent one winter there in 870 AD during which time he built himself a house from which the settlement derives its name.

09 Jul 2022

6

Seydisfjørdur08:00 - 23:00

Seyðisfjörður, a beautiful 19th-century Norwegian village on the east coast of Iceland, is regarded by many as one of Iceland's most picturesque towns, not only due to its impressive environment, but also because nowhere in Iceland has a community of old wooden buildings been preserved so well as here. Poet Matthías Johannessen called Seyðisfjörður a 'pearl enclosed in a shell'. The community owes its origins to foreign merchants, mainly Danes, who started trading in the fjord in the mid-19th century. But the crucial factor in the evolution of the village was the establishment of the Icelandic herring fishery by Norwegians in 1870-1900. The Norwegians built up a number of herring-fishing facilities, and in a matter of years the little community grew into a boom town. Today, about 800 people live in Seyðisfjörður. The local economy has long been based on the fisheries, while light industry also flourishes. Tourism is playing a growing role, as the picturesque town in its spectacular surroundings attracts more and more visitors. The car/passenger ferry Norrøna, which plies between continental Europe and Iceland every summer, docks at Seyðisfjörður every Thursday. Seyðisfjörður has been a cosmopolitan community from its foundation, and the ferry service has contributed to ensuring that it remains so.

10 Jul 2022

7

Djúpivogur07:00 - 18:00

It may be surrounded by pulse-raising volcanic scenery, boast extraordinary wildlife, and sit on a dramatic, jutting fjord - but it's fair to say Djúpivogur likes to take things slow. In fact, Djúpivogur relishes its peace and quiet so much that it's won recognition as a 'Cittaslow' - a Slow City. So prepare to take a new, leisurely look around, as you relax into the breathtaking natural glory of Iceland, and explore this unique location - filled with folklore, fabulous food and fantastic fjords.

11 Jul 2022

8

Runavík12:00 - 23:00

12 Jul 2022

9

At Sea

13 Jul 2022

10

Heimaey Island08:00 - 18:00

It’s hard to imagine, as you stroll Heimaey’s idyllic streets of white wooden houses, that this island was literally torn apart by a spectacular volcanic eruption, just over 40 years ago. The fact that you can visit incredible Heimaey at all is something of a miracle – because the oozing lava of the Eldfell volcano threatened to seal the harbour off completely. Fortunately, its advance was halted by gallons of seawater, pumped onto it by the plucky islanders, who saved their fishing industry in the process. Iceland's famous for its scenery, and the huge castles of volcanic rock that rise out of the sea's waves here are some of the country's most dramatic.

14 Jul 2022

11

Reykjavík

Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.

15 Jul 2022

(This holiday is generally suitable for persons with reduced mobility. For customers with reduced mobility or any medical condition that may require special assistance or arrangements to be made, please notify your Cruise Concierge at the time of your enquiry, so that we can provide specific information as to the suitability of the holiday, as well as make suitable arrangements with the Holiday Provider on your behalf).

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