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Tromso To Reykjavik

10th August 2022 FOR 14 NIGHTS | Silver Whisper

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This fly cruise holiday is financially protected by SILVERSEA under ATOL 4681

Freephone10am - 5pm

0808 202 6105

Includes private door-to-door transfers, Business Class flights, overseas transfers and complimentary shore excursions | Includes 10% early booking bonus - pay in full to receive these prices

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WHY WE RECOMMEND Scandinavia CRUISES

A world away from the sunny Mediterranean and the Caribbean’s white sandy beaches, cruises around the polar regions offer an entirely different adventure.

You could head up into the Arctic Circle during a cruise around the fjords or the Baltic capitals; or sail south from the far tip of Argentina towards the surreal frozen landscapes of Antarctica. Since these are luxury cruises, you could spend your days at sea in a hot whirlpool out on deck, glass of wine in hand – or head ashore on an expedition, learning more about these remote ecosystems with the help of expert guides.

Cruises in the Arctic tend to offer more choice in the warmer summer months, with some voyages available from England and Scotland or even Miami. Set sail from Greenland out of ports like Kangerlussuaq, and you could embark on a tour of Canada and Alaska’s most spectacular destinations like the Smoking Hills, the Yukon Territory and the snow-covered town of Barrow. Equally popular are cruises of the fjords, which focus on Norway’s beautiful ocean inlets and the dramatic mountain landscapes that tower over remote fishing villages beneath.

A luxury cruise is also the perfect way to explore Antarctica, with a wide choice of itineraries available from Ushuaia in Argentina to the rocky shores of Neko, the alien ice structures of Pleneau Island and the striking, rugged landscape of Port Lockroy and its penguin colonies.

With the poles covering such vast distances, and with many ports here often being remote and far-flung, there are countless different ways to see Antarctica or the Arctic Circle on a variety of routes. Call our Cruise Concierge team for friendly, professional travel advice – and let them find and tailor your luxury voyage from among the best cruises in the polar regions.

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itinerary

1

Tromso, Norway

Feel your heart flutter, as you catch your first glimpse of that famous emerald haze dancing across the stars, during your visit to this wonderful Arctic gateway. Located in the far north of Norway, a visit to Tromso beckons you to the extremes of this magical country, to explore a fairytale land of jagged mountains, glistening glaciers and husky-pulled sledges. Despite its remote location, you'll discover a perhaps surprisingly cosmopolitan city, with a healthy student population injecting plenty of energy. View less Sat 250 miles above the Arctic Circle - at 69° north - you can bathe in the midnight sun's glow during summer, before winter brings the thick blackness and starry skies of endless polar nights. The darkness doesn't stop the fun - with a polar night half-marathon taking place in January - but the return of the sun is always a reason for a celebration here. To get the best view over the city, take the cable car to Storsteinen's amazing viewpoint. Magnificent views down over the city, fjord and Tromso's arching bridge will unravel before you. Learn more about northerly traditions, polar expeditions and arctic hunting at the Polar Museum. The Science Centre, meanwhile, explains how humans have harnessed and survived these epic landscapes over the years, and explores Tromso's breathtaking natural spectacle - the northern lights. The city is famed for its extraordinary viewing opportunities, which are often said to be the best in the world. The Alpine Botanic Garden is the most northern such garden on the planet, showcasing some of Norway's hardiest plantlife, which survives and thrives at this nose-bleeding altitude.

10 Aug 2022

2

Narvik, Norway

Slap bang in the middle of Norway’s fjords, islands and northern wonders, Narvik, is an ideal base from which to explore this magical region. A city since 1902, it sits on the coast of Ofotfjorden inside the Arctic circle. This northerly latitude means Narvik bathes in the midnight sun during summer's months and is witness to the dazzling displays of the northern lights, which enchant as they spill across the stars. View less Crisp, clear skies make Narvik a prime destination for northern lights viewing, and the natural setting of spiky mountains and soaring fjords generates a truly glorious spectacle amid incredible staging. Gondolas sway up to the slopes of Narvikfjellet ski resort, which can tempt with fantastic skiing, but also provides a prime spot for views of the lights flashing above. Look out over the vast panorama of the town curving along the fjord's banks, the Fagernesfjellet mountain, and - hopefully - the emerald spread of the natural light display. Polar Park Arctic Wildlife Centre grants Norway’s wildest animals - including wolves, bears and lynx - with a protected haven. Elsewhere, a vast railway, which once transported iron ore to the Swedish border, now provides a dramatic rumble through the best of Norway’s mountain scenery and is one of the country’s most mesmerising rail journeys. Narvik was heavily affected by the Second World War, and the city's museum explains north Norway's strategic importance and explores the German occupation here, as well as the decisive battle for the city's liberation.

11 Aug 2022

3

Leknes

Leknes (Gravdal) is a village in Vestvågøy municipality in the county of Nordland, located on Vestvågøy island which is part of the Lofoten Archipelago in northern Norway (north of the Arctic Circle). Leknes is one of the few towns in Lofoten which is not based upon fisheries and which does not have its town centre by the sea. Because of this, and because of its rapid growth in recent years, it does not have the same traditional wooden architecture as most other towns in Lofoten, and may thus not be regarded to be as picturesque as its neighbouring fishing villages. However, the natural surroundings are regarded to be among the most stunning in Norway, with mountains, peaks, cliffs and white sandy beaches. The town's harbour Leknes Havn is one of Norway's most important and visited harbours for cruise ships.

12 Aug 2022

4

At Sea

13 Aug 2022

5

Andalsnes, Norway

Åndalsnes is located at the mouth of the river Rauma, at the shores of the Romsdalsfjord, one of the fjords protected as a UNESCO world heritage site. Famous in the 19th century for salmon fishing, the Rauma flows through the Romsdalen Valley widely considered some of the most breathtaking scenery in all of Norway. Although the river’s salmon stocks are now being replenished, today Andalsnes is better known as a centre of excellenece for Norwegian alpine sports. Mountaineering, climbing, hiking and even base jumping are all readably accessible. A newly opened Norwegian Mountaineering centre boasts Norway’s highest indoor climbing wall. Some 15 kms out of Andalsnes is the Trollstigen (Troll Road), a mountain road that climbs the pass between the Isterdalen and Valldal valley. It’s one of Norway’s major attractions due to the steep inclines and eleven hairpin bends, only open in the summer months. Equally exciting is a three hour round rail trip from Andalsnes to Dombas on the Rauma Railway line. A feast for the eyes from the comfort of a carriage, mountains, valleys and waterfalls come into sight, as the route follows the Rauma river. Trains thoughtfully slow down at the most photogenic spots. A feat of civil engineering the track passes over countless bridges and through tunnels, the train even performs a 180 degree turn underground. Easily missed, look out at the train station in Andalsnes for a chapel converted from an old red "Intercity Special" railway carriage. The only train chapel in Norway and perhaps the world!

14 Aug 2022

6

Geiranger

Witness Norway at its awe-inspiring best, while exploring one of the world's most beautiful fjords. Geiranger nestles at the end of the majestic Geiranger fjord, itself a branch of the Storfjorden, the Great Fjord. While only 300 hardy souls live in the village when winter is biting, Geiranger's population swells exponentially in the summertime, when the village becomes one of Norway's most visited locations - providing a welcoming base for visitors coming to revel in the fantasy fjord's glory. View less Sweeping horseshoe bends unveil the full majesty of Geiranger fjord, one of two Norwegian fjords singled out for UNESCO World Heritage Site status. Soak it all in, as you sail the ten-mile stretch of glorious scenery, decorated with cascading flows of water. The Seven Sisters is perhaps the most celebrated - sprawling down 250 metres like a flowing head of silvery hair. Look out across from these seven flows to the bottle-shaped waterfall known as The Suitor - legend says he tries eternally, to win the affections of the Seven Sisters opposite. Sail onwards, and you can feel the fresh spray on your face, up close and personal to another spectacular flow - Bridal Veil Waterfall. Geiranger's fjord's banks are decorated with abandoned farms, including Knivsflå, and Skageflå. Or you can experience life on a working cheese farm at Herdalssetra. Winding hairpin mountain roads offer some of Europe's highest fjord views, while the Dalsnibba mountain - which stands close to the fjord - offers spine-tingling views from an epic 1,500-metre high pedestal. Get as close to the edge as you dare, and let this one-of-a-kind landscape of snow-capped mountain peaks and wide fjords utterly overwhelm you.

15 Aug 2022

7

Flam

If we haven’t said it already, Norway’s luxury is its sheer natural beauty. And at the very top of the pile is the all-inclusive Flam, a destination that is home to Glacial waterways lined by evergreen forests amidst jagged mountains and sheer cliff walls. Situated inland, on the arm of the 204-kilometre Sognefjord, the village has just 400 inhabitants. Its little size does not belie its gigantic heart, and Flam’s expansive loveliness knows no bounds. In fact, UNESCO has dedicated the Sognefjord as a World Heritage Site for its exquisite natural beauty. There are many ways to imbibe in the beauty of this destination. Some of the more peaceful among you will enjoy just drinking it all in from the veranda or deck of your ship, while adrenaline bunnies will most probably want to jump in a Zodiac and gain first-hand experience that way. But beware! Travelling the shores of one of the deepest fjords may be exciting but it is also fast, wet and bumpy! Most visitors will not want to miss out on a one-hour train journey that has been describes by more than one source as being “the world’s most beautiful”. The Flam railway is iconic and will have you holding your breath as your travel through steep, winding roads, around massive mountains, and past gushing rivers and waterfalls. Scary? A little. Picturesque? No question. Worth it? Most definitely.

16 Aug 2022

8

Bergen

The crooked, pastel-coloured warehouses of Bergen’s World Heritage waterfront lean together charmingly, welcoming visitors to this city at the heart of Norway’s most extraordinary cinematic landscapes. It may be the country’s second largest city, but the villagey feel here always provides a warm welcome - even when the weather is living up to its famously damp reputation. Bergen’s colourful waterfront, Bryggen, is a ramshackle line-up of incredible Hanseatic warehouses, built following the devastating fire of 1702, which ransacked the city. These iconic warehouses have stood proudly ever since, with Bergen growing and expanding around the colourful facades. Behind them, a labyrinth of narrow alleyways and wooden decking waits, alive with artisan craft shops and bustling galleries. Fløyen mountain watches over the city, and you can take a short but steep hike up to the panoramic viewpoints, or jump on the funicular, which trundles visitors up and down the incline. At the top, spectacular views of Bergen jutting out into the dark seas below unfold before your eyes. Wait until evening to see the sunset painting glorious golden light across the city and waves, and Bergen’s lights flickering into life. Nærøyfjorden, a deeply etched fjord nearby, is perhaps Norway’s most photographed and iconic piece of scenery. A cruise through the base of this spectacular narrow fjord, parting the glass-smooth inky waters, is an utterly humbling experience, as the claustrophobically-close slopes rise imposingly over you. Sognefjord also stretches out nearby, and is Norway’s longest fjord, adorned with plunging waterfalls and vibrant farms during summer.

17 Aug 2022

9

Stavanger

Located on the west coast of southern Norway and, with a population of 100,000 the country's fourth largest city, Stavanger is something of a survivor. While other Norwegian coastal towns have experienced serious decline because of the precarious fortunes of fishing, Stavanger has over the years grown into one of the country's most dynamic economic power bases, thanks to the creation of a merchant fleet, fish canning, shipbuilding and, more recently, the oil industry. With more than 3,000 foreign oil business people residing here who have made English virtually the first language, Stavanger is often referred to as the “Oil Capital of Norway.” To support the offshore oilfields, the port serves refineries and is also involved in the construction of oil rigs. Today's Stavanger is a charming blend of fishing village and modern city, sprinkled with parks, gardens and lakes. The elegant old town with its 12th century cathedral deserves a closer look, and the Canning and Maritime Museums are well worth a visit. Along the length of the harbor, on Torget, is a small daily market with colorful stands of flowers, fruit and vegetables. Teeming water tanks on the quayside hold a variety of fresh fish. The area around the eastern side of the harbor makes up the town's shopping district, a bright mix of spidery lanes, pedestrian streets and white-timbered houses that occupy the site of the original settlement of medieval Stavanger. Outside of town, one can take a trip to the top of Pulpit Rock and other fine lookout points to enjoy the magnificent view. In addition, a worthwhile trip can be made to Utstein Kloster, which was founded in the 13th century and is Norway's oldest and best preserved abbey.

18 Aug 2022

10

Lerwick

Adrift between the Scottish and Norwegian coasts, the craggy Shetland Islands form the most northerly point of the British Isles. Sprawling across 100 islands, connected by sandy bridges and crisscrossing ferries, explore the highlights of this scenic archipelago outpost. With incredible Neolithic history, spanning 5,000 years of human heritage, these islands, which sit just shy of the Arctic Circle, are an isolated and immense treasure trove of history and thrilling scenery. Look out over dramatic coastline from atmospheric Iron Age towers.

19 Aug 2022

11

Torshaven

More than 600 miles (nearly 1,000 kilometres) from Denmark’s west coast lie the Faroes, a triangle of eighteen windswept islands, seventeen of which are inhabited. Only 48,500 people plus some 70,000 sheep roam these remote lands. Much of the islands’ heritage reflects a medieval past, beginning with the arrival of farmers from western Norway who settled here in the 9th century. Evidence of this Scandinavian heritage is preserved through centuries of isolation; ancient structures can still be seen in villages clustered around old churches.

20 Aug 2022

12

At Sea

21 Aug 2022

13

Djupivogur

Slow the pace, and discover the refreshing approach to life that Djupivogur has made its trademark. You can leave your phone behind as you step out into this Icelandic town, which has won awards celebrating its leisurely outlook and stubborn rebellion against the frenetic pace of modern life. After all, who needs emails and notifications when you have some of the most humbling monochrome scenery and gashed fjords, waiting on your doorstep? Sitting on a peninsula to the south-east of Iceland, the glacial approach to life here wins many hearts. A place where hammers knock on metal in workshops, artists ladle paint onto canvases, and wild ponies roam across mountains, Djupivogur is an uninhibited artistic hub - full of makers and creatives. The most expansive project is the 34 egg sculptures that dot the coastline, created by the Icelandic artist, Sigurður Guðmundsson. Each egg represents a different native bird species. Fishing remains the primary industry, and you can savour the soft fruits of the labour in restaurants serving up smoked trout and fish soup within their cosy confines. Wander the surrounding landscapes, where snow-freckled mountains rise, and lazy seals lie on dark rock beaches, to feel Djupivogur's natural inspiration seeping under your skin. Alive with greens and golds in summer, further ventures reveal bright blue glaciers and the sprawling waterfalls of Vatnajökull National Park. The cliff-hugging puffins of Papey Island are a short boat ride away, while Bulandstindur Mountain's pyramid shape is a stand out even among these fairy-tale landscapes.

22 Aug 2022

14

Heimaey, Iceland

Rising like craggy icebergs from the waves, Heimaey and the Westman Islands are a perfect example of nature’s extraordinary power to both create and destroy. Haunted by the same volcanic forces that once forged the islands, it was only the brave actions of the island’s villagers - who stopped the flow of lava from the Eldfell volcano with a wall of seawater - that saved this charming whitewash wooden town from destruction. View less The volcano that exploded in 1973 made headline news around the globe and saw the islanders evacuated during an elaborate rescue mission. Learn more of the most fateful day in the islands’ history at the museum, and see houses - charred black by lava - which have been salvaged and exhibited, frozen in time. The volcanic forces created a beautiful mosaic of craggy islands, just off-shore from the mainland. Alive with animal life - pods of orca whales roll through the Atlantic’s choppy waves, seabirds call in the skies overhead, and baby puffins take tentative first steps on the cliffs hugging these islands. You’ll notice that the islanders have a particular bond with the 8 million Atlantic puffins who live here. Statues of the birds stand on the streets, and extraordinary rescue missions sometimes take place at night – when locals comb the streets to help return lost pufflings to their cliffside homes. Be sure to walk out along the coast to Stórhöfdi, to view the extraordinary colony of these remarkable, adorable birds that live here. For some more tips on spotting the puffins, take a look at our blog.

23 Aug 2022

15

Reykjavik

The fire, frost and water symbolized by the red, white and blue of Iceland's flag are manifested by the ice and snow of its glaciers, the hot mud pools, geysers and glowing lava flows in the country's volcanic regions. The island's settlement dates back to 874 when a Norwegian named Ingolf Arnarson arrived at present-day Reykjavik. In 930, the settlers formed a legislature, the Alting, which was the beginning of the Commonwealth of Iceland. From the 10th to the 14th centuries, Iceland developed a literary form, the Icelandic Saga, which spread throughout the Nordic culture and into the English and German languages. It was used to spin stories of the gods, record historic events and glorify heroes. As Iceland's capital and main center of the country's population, the city of Reykjavik is a fascinating blend of the traditional and modernism. Just as Iceland is a unique country – rugged and remote, yet technically advanced and enjoying Nordic standards of affluence – Reykjavik is a highly unusual capital city. It dominates the life of Iceland in almost every way. More than half of the country's total population of 270,000 is living in and around the capital, and the economy of the entire nation depends on Reykjavik. Nearly 60 percent of Iceland's imports are received and distributed, and 40 percent of the country's exports are loaded for shipment via the port of Reykjavik. It is also the headquarters of what is probably the world's most advanced seafood industry, which counts for Iceland's number one export.

24 Aug 2022

(This holiday is generally suitable for persons with reduced mobility. For customers with reduced mobility or any medical condition that may require special assistance or arrangements to be made, please notify your Cruise Concierge at the time of your enquiry, so that we can provide specific information as to the suitability of the holiday, as well as make suitable arrangements with the Holiday Provider on your behalf).

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