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Papeete (Tahiti) To Auckland

22nd December 2022 FOR 16 NIGHTS | Silver Whisper

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This fly cruise holiday is financially protected by SILVERSEA under ATOL 4681

Freephone9am - 8pm

0808 202 6105

Concierge expertise

First-class service

Includes private door-to-door transfers, flights, overseas transfers, one-night pre-cruise hotel stay and complimentary shore excursions

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1) All guests need to be in possession of a valid UK passport. This is also the case on any British Isles cruises. Please click here to check your passport will still be valid on your dates of travel.

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3) Please check the vaccination and testing requirements from the FCDO, your cruise line and any destination countries here

WHY WE RECOMMEND Pacific CRUISES

The vast and imposing Pacific Ocean is home to an array of marvellous island destinations to discover on a luxury cruise adventure, mainly located within the stunning South Pacific and French Polynesian archipelagos.

Discover exotic culture and uncover rich heritage in a collection of secluded islands across the South Pacific, all of which are sure to capture the imagination and never fail to inspire. You'll find some of the world's most idyllic and peaceful destinations across this wonderfully sparse region, and you're sure to find your personal paradise on one of many amazing island destinations.

Just some of the marvellous destinations across the Pacific regions of Polynesia, Micronesia and Melanesia include the sun-soaked islands of Fiji, Tahiti and Bora Bora, as well as utterly remote islands such as the Pitcairn Islands and Easter Island. Many of these fantastic locations are included within South Pacific cruise itineraries, offering a peaceful and breathtaking escape from the mundane.

There's nowhere else on Earth quite like the islands of the South Pacific, and a luxury cruise escape across the vast archipelago, you'll discover exactly why so many traveller have been enchanted by their timeless charm and incredible beauty.

A luxury cruise is the perfect way to see the Pacific, which is home to some of the world’s most beautiful island destinations. With so many routes available, you’ll want to make sure that your holiday matches your expectations – and that’s why our dedicated Cruise Concierge team will work to find and tailor your voyage from among the best cruises in the Pacific.

Browse the many fabulous South Pacific cruise itineraries on offer at SixStarCruises.co.uk and book your place on-board with one of the world's finest six-star cruise lines today while you still can.

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itinerary

1

Papeete, Tahiti00:00 - 19:00

Papeete will be your gateway to the tropical paradise of French Polynesia, where islands fringed with gorgeous beaches and turquoise ocean await to soothe the soul. This spirited city is the capital of French Polynesia, and serves as a superb base for onward exploration of Tahiti – an island of breathtaking landscapes and oceanic vistas. Wonderful lagoons of crisp, clear water beg to be snorkelled, stunning black beaches and blowholes pay tribute to the island's volcanic heritage, and lush green mountains beckon you inland on adventures, as you explore extraordinary Tahiti. Visit to relax inside picturesque stilted huts, which stand out over shimmering water, as you settle into the intoxicating rhythm of life, in this Polynesian paradise.

22 Dec 2022

2

Bora-Bora08:00 - 23:00

Simply saying the name Bora Bora is usually enough to induce gasps of jealousy, as images of milky blue water, sparkling white beaches and casually leaning palm trees immediately spring to mind. The imagination doesn't lie, either, and if you visit, you’ll soon realise this island is every bit as gorgeous as you ever imagined. Thatched wooden huts stand out over shallow, sparkling seawater, with vivid fish swirling just below. Soak up the sun, scuba dive, or simply revel in the opulent luxury of one of the island's many magnificent resorts. If blissful inactivity doesn't appeal, then get active, and hike the greenery of the sharp Mount Pahia.

23 Dec 2022

3

Raiatea08:00 - 17:00

The largest of the Leeward Islands, Raiatea is totally surrounded by a reef but has several navigable passes and the only navigable river in French Polynesia. Raiatea shares a protected lagoon with the island of Taha'a; legends tell how the two islands were cut apart by a mythical eel. Although it has no beaches, there are picture-postcard motus (flat reef islets) with nice beaches in the lagoon. One of the nicest things about Raiatea is that it remains "undiscovered" by most visitors to French Polynesia. Before European encroachment, Raiatea was the religious, cultural and political center of Tahiti-Polynesia. It was also Captain Cook's favorite island. The last resistance to the French takeover on the island lasted until 1897, when French troops and warships used arms to conquer the island. The native leader of the resistance, Teraupoo, was deported to New Caledonia. Raiatea is an archaeologist's delight. Scientists have unearthed artifacts linking the island with Hawaii. Local tradition says Raiatea was the great jumping-off point for ancient Polynesian mariners. There are a significant number of marae (Tahitian temples), including Taputapuatea. Considered the most important temple in the Society Islands, it is a national monument. In Uturoa, the main port, the colorful market is most crowded on Wednesday and Friday mornings when the Tahaa people arrive by motorized canoe to sell their products. Behind Uturoa, you can climb Tapioi Hill, one of the easiest and best climbs in Tahiti-Polynesia, and get a great view of four islands. Near the village of Pufau, Mount Temehani is the highest point on the island and the only home in the world of the Tiare Apetahi flower.

24 Dec 2022

4

At Sea

25 Dec 2022

5

Rarotonga08:00 - 18:00

Life is laid back on Rarotonga, the most populous of the Cook Islands, but the residents are still an active bunch. Though there are plenty of white sandy beaches on which to laze—and people do, with plenty of napping— locals love to get out and move. Join them in snorkeling, diving, riding—bikes, horses, scooters—fishing, bush walking, and playing squash and tennis. Another popular, if odd, and favorite activity is lining up along the sea wall adjacent to the airport's runway to be jetblasted.

26 Dec 2022

6

Aitutaki08:00 - 14:00

Even high praise like the 'world's most beautiful island' from Lonely Planet's co-founder, Tony Wheeler, won't prepare you for the intoxicating intensity of the coal blue ocean, the glow of the pure white sand, and the soothing ripple of the palm-tree forests at incredible Aitutaki. Breathless romance hangs thick in the air here, especially when a riot of purples, reds and oranges are spreading across the sky, accompanying the sun's descent each evening. It wasn't until 1789 that Europeans discovered this island haven, with the HMS Bounty's crew arriving, just a few weeks before a mutiny tore them apart. The Europeans were beaten to the islands, however, by the streamlined wooden canoes of the Polynesian settlers, who arrived around 900AD. While Western missionaries would eventually visit to spread Christianity to the island - evidenced by the white, coral-encrusted walls of the many churches - their efforts to repress the people’s deep love of communal singing and dancing ultimately failed, and music forms a key component of the islanders' culture to this day.The beaches here are flawless, and swaying in a hammock, suspended between leaning palm trees, as the ocean gently ruffles the sand nearby, feels gloriously indulgent. Aitutaki Lagoon is a huge aquamarine pool of water, alive with a kaleidoscopic swirl of tropical fish, which lurk just below the surface. You may even be lucky enough to spot turtles padding across the sand, scraping themselves towards the open ocean.The snorkelling opportunities here, and on One Foot Island - where you'll want to acquire the badge of honour of having your passport stamped with the island's iconic huge footprint - are sublime. Don't miss the tiny island of Moturakau either, which is crammed full of exotic birds and crabs, who have dominion over the island's tangled, jungle terrain. 

27 Dec 2022

7

At Sea

28 Dec 2022

8

Pago Pago09:00 - 18:00

American Samoa is a tropical paradise, located in the Pacific Ocean and home to some of the world's most unique flora and fauna. Pago Pago is the main harbour and village of Tutuila island. It is considered the capital of the territory and is the entry point for visitors exploring the picturesque volcanic islands.

29 Dec 2022

9

International Date Line

30 Dec 2022

10

Apia07:00 - 17:00

Samoa is a group of ten islands located in the South Pacific. The tropical climate and volcanic landscape create a picturesque location for visitors to explore, together with the experience of Fa'a Samoa, the three thousand year old way of life on Samoa.

31 Dec 2022

11
12

At Sea

01 Jan 2023 - 02 Jan 2023

13

Savusavu08:00 - 18:00

Suva, a multiracial city, is the pulsing heart of the South Pacific. Its location is on a hilly peninsula in the southeast corner of Viti Levu Island, the largest in the Fijian archipelago. Suva was named the country's capital in 1882; the former capital was Luvuka. Suva's natural harbour was no doubt a deciding factor that prompted the change. Its port is the country's main shipping facility, accommodating vessels from all over the world. The town is backed by the lush green hills of the Suva-Rewa range. The waterfront district, much of which is built on land reclaimed from tangled mangrove swamps, provides the hub for much of Suva's activities. The downtown centre is a hodgepodge of high-rise office buildings, colonial houses with second-story verandas, parks and government structures. The northern and western mountains catch the trade winds, with the result being damp conditions year-round and frequent tropical downpours. Despite the ever-present possibility of showers, Suva is an excellent place to explore on foot. Many points of interest are located on Victoria Parade and along tree-shaded Queen Elizabeth Drive. Suva's botanical park is lush with flowering plants, trees and green lawns. In its centre stands the Fiji Museum, where objects reflect 3,000 years of Fijian history. The museum boasts a fine collection of Melanesian artefacts and various exhibits that reflect on Fiji's maritime era. Government House stands on a hillside surrounded by landscaped grounds. A stern, uniformed sentry guards the pillared gate entrance. The monthly Changing of the Guard is executed with almost as much pomp and ceremony as at London's Buckingham Palace. Friendly Fiji will charm you; here Melanesia mixes with Polynesia, ancient India with Oceania and tradition with the modern world. The Fijian greeting "Bula!" is extended warmly to strangers on city streets and country roads. Fiji is one of the South Pacific's most hospitable countries and a holiday destination that has much to offer in recreational activities, shopping and joyous celebrations.

03 Jan 2023

14

Lautoka08:00 - 18:00

North of Nadi through sugarcane plantations and past the Sabeto Mountains is Lautoka, nicknamed the Sugar City for the local agriculture and its big processing mill. With a population of around 50,000, it's the only city besides Suva and, like the capital, has a pleasant waterfront. It's the sailing point for Blue Lagoon and Beachcomber Cruises but is otherwise unremarkable for tourists, itself having few hotels and fewer good restaurants. Locals recommend the city as a less-expensive place to shop for clothing, but note that it can take as long as 45 minutes to drive here. Legend has it that Lautoka acquired its name when two chiefs engaged in combat and one hit the other with a spear. He proclaimed "lau toka" (spear hit) and thus the future town was named.

04 Jan 2023

15
16

At Sea

05 Jan 2023 - 06 Jan 2023

17

Bay of Islands12:30 - 19:00

The Tasman Sea on the west and the Pacific Ocean on the east meet at thetop of North Island at Cape Reinga. No matter what route you take, you'll passfarms and forests, marvellous beaches, and great open spaces. The East Coast,up to the Bay of Islands, is Northland's most densely populated, often withrefugees from bigger cities—looking for a more relaxed life—clustered aroundbreathtaking beaches. The first decision on the drive north comes at the footof the Brynderwyn Hills. Turning left will take you up the West Coast throughareas once covered with forests and now used for either agricultural orhorticulture. Driving over "the Brynderwyns," as they are known,takes you to Whangarei, the only city in Northland. If you're in the mood for adiversion, you can slip to the beautiful coastline and take in Waipu Cove, anarea settled by Scots, and Laings Beach, where million-dollar homes sit next tosmall Kiwi beach houses.An hour's drive farther north is the Bay of Islands, known all over theworld for its beauty. There you will find lush forests, splendid beaches, andshimmering harbors. The Treaty of Waitangi was signed here in 1840 betweenMāoriand the British Crown, establishing the basis for the modern New Zealandstate. Every year on February 6, the extremely beautiful Waitangi Treaty Ground(the name means weeping waters) is the sight of a celebration of the treaty andprotests by Māori unhappy with it. Continuing north on the East Coast, theagricultural backbone of the region is even more evident and a series ofwinding loop roads off the main highway will take you to beaches that are bothbeautiful and isolated where you can swim, dive, picnic, or just laze. .The West Coast is even less populated, and the coastline is rugged andwindswept. In the Waipoua Forest, you will find some of New Zealand's oldestand largest kauri trees; the winding road will also take you past mangroveswamps. Crowning the region is the spiritually significant Cape Reinga, theheadland at the top of the vast stretch of 90 Mile Beach, where it's believedMāori souls depart after death. Today Māori make up roughly a quarter of thearea's population (compared with the national average of about 15%). The legendaryMāori navigator Kupe was said to have landed on the shores of Hokianga Harbour,where the first arrivals made their home. Many different wi (tribes) livedthroughout Northland, including Ngapuhi (the largest), Te Roroa, Ngati Wai,Ngati Kuri, Te Aupouri, Ngaitakoto, Ngati Kahu, and Te Rarawa. Many Māoriherecan trace their ancestry to the earliest inhabitants

07 Jan 2023

18

Auckland

Auckland is called the City of Sails, and visitors flying in will see why. On the East Coast is the Waitemata Harbour—a Māori word meaning sparkling waters—which is bordered by the Hauraki Gulf, an aquatic playground peppered with small islands where many Aucklanders can be found "mucking around in boats."Not surprisingly, Auckland has some 70,000 boats. About one in four households in Auckland has a seacraft of some kind, and there are 102 beaches within an hour's drive; during the week many are quite empty. Even the airport is by the water; it borders the Manukau Harbour, which also takes its name from the Māori language and means solitary bird.According to Māori tradition, the Auckland isthmus was originally peopled by a race of giants and fairy folk. When Europeans arrived in the early 19th century, however, the Ngāti-Whātua tribe was firmly in control of the region. The British began negotiations with the Ngāti-Whātua in 1840 to purchase the isthmus and establish the colony's first capital. In September of that year the British flag was hoisted to mark the township's foundation, and Auckland remained the capital until 1865, when the seat of government was moved to Wellington. Aucklanders expected to suffer from the shift; it hurt their pride but not their pockets. As the terminal for the South Sea shipping routes, Auckland was already an established commercial center. Since then the urban sprawl has made this city of approximately 1.3 million people one of the world's largest geographically.A couple of days in the city will reveal just how developed and sophisticated Auckland is—the Mercer City Survey 2012 saw it ranked as the third-highest city for quality of life—though those seeking a New York in the South Pacific will be disappointed. Auckland is more get-up and go-outside than get-dressed-up and go-out. That said, most shops are open daily, central bars and a few nightclubs buzz well into the wee hours, especially Thursday through Saturday, and a mix of Māori, Pacific people, Asians, and Europeans contributes to the cultural milieu. Auckland has the world's largest single population of Pacific Islanders living outside their home countries, though many of them live outside the central parts of the city and in Manukau to the south. The Samoan language is the second most spoken in New Zealand. Most Pacific people came to New Zealand seeking a better life. When the plentiful, low-skilled work that attracted them dried up, the dream soured, and the population has suffered with poor health and education. Luckily, policies are now addressing that, and change is slowly coming. The Pacifica Festival in March is the region's biggest cultural event, attracting thousands to Western Springs. The annual Pacific Island Secondary Schools’ Competition, also in March, sees young Pacific Islander and Asian students compete in traditional dance, drumming, and singing. This event is open to the public.At the geographical center of Auckland city is the 1,082-foot Sky Tower, a convenient landmark for those exploring on foot and some say a visible sign of the city's naked aspiration. It has earned nicknames like the Needle and the Big Penis—a counterpoint to a poem by acclaimed New Zealand poet James K. Baxter, which refers to Rangitoto Island as a clitoris in the harbor.The Waitemata Harbour has become better known since New Zealand staged its first defense of the America's Cup in 2000 and the successful Louis Vuitton Pacific Series in early 2009. The first regatta saw major redevelopment of the waterfront. The area, where many of the city's most popular bars, cafés, and restaurants are located, is now known as Viaduct Basin or, more commonly, the Viaduct. A recent expansion has created another area, Wynyard Quarter, which is slowly adding restaurants.These days, Auckland is still considered too bold and brash for its own good by many Kiwis who live "south of the Bombay Hills," the geographical divide between Auckland and the rest of New Zealand (barring Northland). "Jafa," an acronym for "just another f—ing Aucklander," has entered the local lexicon; there's even a book out called Way of the Jafa: A Guide to Surviving Auckland and Aucklanders. A common complaint is that Auckland absorbs the wealth from the hard work of the rest of the country. Most Aucklanders, on the other hand, still try to shrug and see it as the parochial envy of those who live in small towns. But these internal identity squabbles aren't your problem. You can enjoy a well-made coffee in almost any café, or take a walk on a beach—knowing that within 30 minutes' driving time you could be cruising the spectacular harbor, playing a round at a public golf course, or even walking in subtropical forest while listening to the song of a native tûî bird.

08 Jan 2023

(This holiday is generally suitable for persons with reduced mobility. For customers with reduced mobility or any medical condition that may require special assistance or arrangements to be made, please notify your Cruise Concierge at the time of your enquiry, so that we can provide specific information as to the suitability of the holiday, as well as make suitable arrangements with the Holiday Provider on your behalf).

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This website will provide you with information on the financial protection that applies in the case of each holiday and travel service offered before you make your booking. At the time of booking, our Cruise Concierge will also confirm the financial protection applicable to your specific holiday. Please ask us for further information should you require it. The flight inclusive holidays on this website are financially protected by the ATOL scheme. But ATOL protection does not apply to all holiday and travel services listed on this website. If you do not receive an ATOL Certificate then the booking will not be ATOL protected. If you do receive an ATOL Certificate but all parts of your trip are not listed on it, those parts will not be ATOL protected. The cruise-only holidays on this website are financially protected by ABTA. Please see our booking terms and conditions for further information or for more information about financial protection and the ATOL Certificate, click here. SixStarCruises acts as a retail agent to you and also as a disclosed agent of the holiday provider (the Organiser of the holiday).