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Northern Europe & British Isles

22nd May 2022 FOR 24 NIGHTS | Silver Whisper

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ITINERARY
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This fly cruise holiday is financially protected by SILVERSEA under ATOL 4681

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NEW - Private door-to-door transfers! Combination cruise - save up to 20%! | Includes Business Class flights, overseas transfer and complimentary shore excursions | Includes 10% early booking bonus - book and pay in full to receive these prices

WHY WE RECOMMEND Europe CRUISES

On a European cruise, you could discover the Gallic charm of the Channel Islands, experience Ireland's ancient sights and welcoming towns, or see the misty highlands and rich clan heritage along Scotland's rugged coast. Cross the North Sea to Iceland on your cruise and you'll find one of the world’s most unique and secluded landscapes – a land of volcanoes, thermal springs, geysers and boiling lakes.

Alternatively, you could tour beautiful cities and rolling countryside on cruises to France, Belgium and Holland, or see Portugal's striking city ports and Spain's milder northern coast. Further afield you could visit the beautiful Canary Islands too, where clear seas wash against bright white beaches – the perfect place to relax in style on a luxury trip ashore.

Europe is one of the world's most popular continents for cruise holidays and is home to an incredible collection of iconic cities, each brimming with a fascinating heritage, vibrant cultures and plenty of intriguing sightseeing opportunities. Every destination on a European cruise itinerary will boast a long and interesting past, with plenty of cultural experiences and ancient landmarks on offer to showcase this rich history.

On a luxury European voyage, travellers will have the opportunity to head ashore and explore on their own, or enjoy one of many exciting shore excursions offered by their cruise line, providing the perfect chance to delve into the sights and sounds of each destination they visit and discover even more in port.

Take a look at the fantastic range of luxury European itineraries available to book now at SixStarCruises, with the world's finest luxury cruise lines. Once you've found your ideal voyage, call our expert Cruise Concierge team to secure your place on-board and start looking forward to an unforgettable escape across this diverse and captivating continent.

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itinerary

1

Copenhagen, Denmark

Effortlessly cool and down to earth, Copenhagen is a contemporary, clean and classy highlight of Scandinavia. A city built to be liveable, Copenhagen has refused to compromise, resulting in a forward-thinking metropolis that’s green and clean. Swim in the waters of Havnebadet Islands during summer, or shelter from winter’s bite by snuggling in beside a roaring open fire during winter. You can even hop on a train to Sweden, traversing the famous span of a Nordic Noir star - the Öresund Bridge. It takes just a touch over half an hour to step off the train in Malmö. There’s only one way to truly explore Copenhagen and that’s on two wheels. Easy bike hire schemes will get you moving across this flat city, designed with bikes at the forefront of the mind. Choose a model with electronic assistance to take the strain out of any journey, giving you the freedom to whizz around and explore the modern angular architecture of the centre, and the pastoral colours of Nyhavn waterfront. Head out to the Little Mermaid statue, inspired by Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tale - the strikingly-restrained statue is the perfect landmark for Copenhagen; unshowy, self-assured and utterly irresistible. The Danish concept of hygge is very much alive here, and you’ll feel that warm cosy feeling as you visit cafes illuminated by the warm glow of hanging filament bulbs, and stuffed to the brim with thick, dusty books. Home to mega-brewer Carlsberg, Copenhagen is also a city for hop enthusiasts, and there is a thriving craft brewing scene to sample. Danish Smørrebrød sandwiches are a must try, or for something a little more substantial, settle in for a culinary voyage and try a taster menu – the city’s restaurants are littered with Michelin stars.

22 May 2022

2
3

Longyearbyen/Oslo, Norway

The capital of Norway since 1299, Oslo is the nation's largest city. Located on an island-studded fjord, with its forest-clad hills and lakes in the hinterland, Oslo provides recreational opportunities that few capital cities can match. According to historians, the city was founded in 1050 by Harold III. In later years, Hakon V declared Oslo the capital of Norway and built Akershus Castle. As the country's capital, Oslo is the royal residence, seat of government, Supreme Court, and also the site of Norway's oldest university. Through its 950-year history, the city suffered many fires, including an especially devastating one in 1624. As a result, Oslo presents a mixture of several architectural styles. Visitors will find a full range of activities among the numerous galleries, museums, restaurants, nightclubs and theaters. With a fairly compact city center, many of Oslo's attractions can be reached on foot; ferryboats departing from the harbor can easily reach the Bygdøy peninsula.

23 May 2022 - 24 May 2022

4

Kristiansund

Located halfway up the long Norwegian coast, Kristiansund is spread out across a swathe of rocky islands with its main cove centered on Nordlandet, Gomalandet/Kirklandet and Innlandet, all linked together by bridges. Founded in 1742 as a trading port, Krustiansund retains an old town area around the harbor where a customs house, warehouses, merchants’ dwellings and various museums recall the trades that ensured Kristiansund’s prosperity.

25 May 2022

5

Bergen, Norway

The crooked, pastel-coloured warehouses of Bergen’s World Heritage waterfront lean together charmingly, welcoming visitors to this city at the heart of Norway’s most extraordinary cinematic landscapes. It may be the country’s second largest city, but the villagey feel here always provides a warm welcome - even when the weather is living up to its famously damp reputation. Bergen’s colourful waterfront, Bryggen, is a ramshackle line-up of incredible Hanseatic warehouses, built following the devastating fire of 1702, which ransacked the city. These iconic warehouses have stood proudly ever since, with Bergen growing and expanding around the colourful facades. Behind them, a labyrinth of narrow alleyways and wooden decking waits, alive with artisan craft shops and bustling galleries. Fløyen mountain watches over the city, and you can take a short but steep hike up to the panoramic viewpoints, or jump on the funicular, which trundles visitors up and down the incline. At the top, spectacular views of Bergen jutting out into the dark seas below unfold before your eyes. Wait until evening to see the sunset painting glorious golden light across the city and waves, and Bergen’s lights flickering into life. Nærøyfjorden, a deeply etched fjord nearby, is perhaps Norway’s most photographed and iconic piece of scenery. A cruise through the base of this spectacular narrow fjord, parting the glass-smooth inky waters, is an utterly humbling experience, as the claustrophobically-close slopes rise imposingly over you. Sognefjord also stretches out nearby, and is Norway’s longest fjord, adorned with plunging waterfalls and vibrant farms during summer.

26 May 2022

6

Flam

If we haven’t said it already, Norway’s luxury is its sheer natural beauty. And at the very top of the pile is the all-inclusive Flam, a destination that is home to Glacial waterways lined by evergreen forests amidst jagged mountains and sheer cliff walls. Situated inland, on the arm of the 204-kilometre Sognefjord, the village has just 400 inhabitants. Its little size does not belie its gigantic heart, and Flam’s expansive loveliness knows no bounds. In fact, UNESCO has dedicated the Sognefjord as a World Heritage Site for its exquisite natural beauty. There are many ways to imbibe in the beauty of this destination. Some of the more peaceful among you will enjoy just drinking it all in from the veranda or deck of your ship, while adrenaline bunnies will most probably want to jump in a Zodiac and gain first-hand experience that way. But beware! Travelling the shores of one of the deepest fjords may be exciting but it is also fast, wet and bumpy! Most visitors will not want to miss out on a one-hour train journey that has been describes by more than one source as being “the world’s most beautiful”. The Flam railway is iconic and will have you holding your breath as your travel through steep, winding roads, around massive mountains, and past gushing rivers and waterfalls. Scary? A little. Picturesque? No question. Worth it? Most definitely.

27 May 2022

7

Alesund, Norway

Decorative turrets, pastel-coloured paint and elegant buildings reflect in the glass-smooth harbour waters of Ålesund, welcoming you to one of the world’s finest havens of Art Nouveau architecture. A perfect complement of natural and man-made beauty, the city’s distinctive jugendstil style is enhanced by a thrilling location amid colossal fjord scenery. Geirangerfjord World Heritage Site of is one of Norway’s most spectacular fjords, and it comes alive in summer with gushing meltwater falls plummeting from steep banks to pristine water below. View less Undoubtedly one of the most beautiful towns in Norway, practically every building in Ålesund boasts fantastical flourishes and eccentric quirks. Rebuilt from the ashes of the devastating fire that swept through in 1904, the town is now a unique historic treasure trove. Wander fairy-tale cobbled streets, and admire endless dainty turrets and decorative swirls, before reaching the Aksla Viewpoint and letting the true majesty of the town’s dreamlike setting wash over you, while gazing over its archipelago. Enjoy a sugar-kick with a bite of folded svele – an indulgent, buttery Norwegian pancake - or settle in to a cosy restaurant for something a little more substantial. Ålesundis a town built on sea trade, and a regular haul of fjord cod is brought ashore before being distributed right across the world. Dried, salted cod – known as klipfish – is a particular speciality, with Ålesund producing an incredible two thirds of the world’s supply.

28 May 2022

8

Eidfjord, Norway

Eidfjord is a municipality in Vestland county, Norway. The municipality is located in the traditional district of Hardanger. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Eidfjord, where the majority of the municipal population lives.

29 May 2022

9

Stavanger, Norway

Located on the west coast of southern Norway and, with a population of 100,000 the country's fourth largest city, Stavanger is something of a survivor. While other Norwegian coastal towns have experienced serious decline because of the precarious fortunes of fishing, Stavanger has over the years grown into one of the country's most dynamic economic power bases, thanks to the creation of a merchant fleet, fish canning, shipbuilding and, more recently, the oil industry. With more than 3,000 foreign oil business people residing here who have made English virtually the first language, Stavanger is often referred to as the “Oil Capital of Norway.” To support the offshore oilfields, the port serves refineries and is also involved in the construction of oil rigs. Today's Stavanger is a charming blend of fishing village and modern city, sprinkled with parks, gardens and lakes. The elegant old town with its 12th century cathedral deserves a closer look, and the Canning and Maritime Museums are well worth a visit. Along the length of the harbor, on Torget, is a small daily market with colorful stands of flowers, fruit and vegetables. Teeming water tanks on the quayside hold a variety of fresh fish. The area around the eastern side of the harbor makes up the town's shopping district, a bright mix of spidery lanes, pedestrian streets and white-timbered houses that occupy the site of the original settlement of medieval Stavanger. Outside of town, one can take a trip to the top of Pulpit Rock and other fine lookout points to enjoy the magnificent view. In addition, a worthwhile trip can be made to Utstein Kloster, which was founded in the 13th century and is Norway's oldest and best preserved abbey.

30 May 2022

10

At Sea

31 May 2022

11
12

Hamburg, Germany

A true city of water, effortlessly cool Hamburg is an outward-looking city, with a unique flow of its own. Nestled snugly between the Baltic and North seas, Germany's second-biggest city is intersected by a frayed network of rivers and canals, spanned by hundreds of pretty bridges. The comparisons are obvious - but Hamburg's reputation as the 'Venice of the North' is a little wide of the mark. View less This quirky, heritage-filled city has a distinct character and open outlook all of its own, and continues to relish its role as Germany's gateway to the world. The water brought Hamburg its wealth, and vast redbrick warehouses stack up against the waterfront in the Speicherstadt district - now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. They linger from the era when the city was a Hanseatic League trading capital and the warehouses essentially formed a city unto themselves, with goods brought and exchanged from distant shores. Elsewhere, the Reeperbahn is a notorious and unabashed street of nocturnal mischief, with shifty neon-lit nightclubs, in amongst the city's famous red-light district. Hamburg has a much more wholesome side too, however, and is a powerhouse of museums, theatre and culture. It’s littered with over 100 music venues and the city played a crucial role in The Beatles’ early story. The spectacular Elbphilharmonie concert hall, with its wavy, surrealistic interior, is a work of art in and of itself. The city has been named a European Green Capital, and the vast Lake Alster adds to the airy, pleasant atmosphere, providing a spacious oasis of tranquillity. Planten un Blomen is another burst of zesty colour, where fountains fan out, and lilypads float on rhododendron-lined lakes.

01 Jun 2022 - 02 Jun 2022

13

At Sea

03 Jun 2022

14
15

Edinburgh (Leith) United Kingdom

Edinburgh is to London as poetry is to prose, as Charlotte Brontë once wrote. One of the world's stateliest cities and proudest capitals, it's built—like Rome—on seven hills, making it a striking backdrop for the ancient pageant of history. In a skyline of sheer drama, Edinburgh Castle watches over the capital city, frowning down on Princes Street’s glamour and glitz. But despite its rich past, the city’s famous festivals, excellent museums and galleries, as well as the modern Scottish Parliament, are reminders that Edinburgh has its feet firmly in the 21st century.Nearly everywhere in Edinburgh (the burgh is always pronounced burra in Scotland) there are spectacular buildings, whose Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian pillars add touches of neoclassical grandeur to the largely Presbyterian backdrop. Large gardens are a strong feature of central Edinburgh, where the city council is one of the most stridently conservationist in Europe. Arthur's Seat, a mountain of bright green and yellow furze, rears up behind the spires of the Old Town. This child-size mountain jutting 822 feet above its surroundings has steep slopes and little crags, like a miniature Highlands set down in the middle of the busy city. Appropriately, these theatrical elements match Edinburgh's character—after all, the city has been a stage that has seen its fair share of romance, violence, tragedy, and triumph.Modern Edinburgh has become a cultural capital, staging the Edinburgh International Festival and the Fringe Festival in every possible venue each August. The stunning Museum of Scotland complements the city’s wealth of galleries and artsy hangouts. Add Edinburgh’s growing reputation for food and nightlife and you have one of the world’s most beguiling cities.Today the city is the second most important financial center in the United Kingdom, and the fifth most important in Europe. The city regularly is ranked near the top in quality-of-life surveys. Accordingly, New Town apartments on fashionable streets sell for considerable sums. In some senses the city is showy and materialistic, but Edinburgh still supports learned societies, some of which have their roots in the Scottish Enlightenment. The Royal Society of Edinburgh, for example, established in 1783 "for the advancement of learning and useful knowledge," remains an important forum for interdisciplinary activities.Even as Edinburgh moves through the 21st century, its tall guardian castle remains the focal point of the city and its venerable history. Take time to explore the streets—peopled by the spirits of Mary, Queen of Scots; Sir Walter Scott; and Robert Louis Stevenson—and pay your respects to the world's best-loved terrier, Greyfriars Bobby. In the evenings you can enjoy candlelit restaurants or a folk ceilidh (pronounced kay-lee, a traditional Scottish dance with music), though you should remember that you haven't earned your porridge until you've climbed Arthur's Seat. Should you wander around a corner, say, on George Street, you might see not an endless cityscape, but blue sea and a patchwork of fields. This is the county of Fife, beyond the inlet of the North Sea called the Firth of Forth—a reminder, like the mountains to the northwest that can be glimpsed from Edinburgh's highest points, that the rest of Scotland lies within easy reach.

04 Jun 2022 - 05 Jun 2022

16

Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, U.K.

Scattered just off the northern tip of Scotland, Kirkwall is the capital of the Orkney Islands - a scenic archipelago of fascinating, dual heritage. The Viking influence is deep, while a prehistoric past and World War history adds to the endless stories that these dramatic islands have to tell. Sparse and beautiful, let the sweeping seascapes of frothing waves, and dance of the northern lights, enchant you as you explore. Windswept beaches are inhabited by whooping swans, while grassy cliffs hide puffins amid their wavy embrace. View less Sea caves and crumbling castles - and the dramatic meeting of the North Sea and the Atlantic Ocean add to the romantic beauty of these lands, which may be physically close to the UK, but feel an entire world away. The sandstone St. Magnus Cathedral is the centrepiece of Orkney's main town - a place of winding lanes and atmospheric walks - and Britain's northernmost cathedral is a masterpiece that took 300 years to complete. Started in 1137, the beautiful cathedral is adorned with mesmerising stain-glass windows and has been evocatively named as the Light of the North. Look down over the ruined Bishop’s and Earl’s Palaces nearby from the tip of the cathedral's tower. Or, test out the islands' history-rich distilleries, which produce smokey single malts - said to be the best in the world. You can also venture out to Europe's best-preserved Stone Age Village, at the extraordinary World Heritage Site of Skara Brae, which offers an unparalleled vision into prehistoric life.

06 Jun 2022

17

Lerwick, Shetland Islands United Kingdom

Adrift between the Scottish and Norwegian coasts, the craggy Shetland Islands form the most northerly point of the British Isles. Sprawling across 100 islands, connected by sandy bridges and crisscrossing ferries, explore the highlights of this scenic archipelago outpost. With incredible Neolithic history, spanning 5,000 years of human heritage, these islands, which sit just shy of the Arctic Circle, are an isolated and immense treasure trove of history and thrilling scenery. Look out over dramatic coastline from atmospheric Iron Age towers.

07 Jun 2022

18

Stornoway (Isle Of Lewis)

The Hebrides, or Western Isles, are a group of more than 500 islands off Scotland's west coast in the Atlantic Ocean of which about one hundred are inhabited. They are divided into the Inner and Outer Hebrides. The Inner Hebrides are comprised of Skye, Mull, Islay, and Jura. The Outer Hebrides include Lewis and Harris, North and South Uist, Benbecula, Barra, Saint Kilda, and the Flannan Islands. The archipelago covers an area of 4,500 square miles (7,200 sq km). Most of its islands are covered by sparse vegetation and boast a fairly mild climate. Tourism, sheep and cattle raising, and the manufacture of textiles are the principal sources of income. The most famous export item is no doubt the excellent Harris tweed.

08 Jun 2022

19

Belfast

Reborn as a cool, modern city, Belfast has successfully left its troubles behind, emerging as a hotbed of culture and architecture, where the comfort of a cosy pub is never far away. Take a voyage of discovery in its maritime quarter, home to a celebrated museum dedicated to the most famous ship ever built, which was constructed right here in the city’s shipyards. A walk across the Lagan Weir Footbridge brings you to Belfast’s fascinating Titanic District – an area of the city devoted to its rich ship-building heritage. The state-of-the-art Titanic Museum brings the story of the doomed vessel to life, and is the largest museum dedicated to the infamously ‘unsinkable’ ship. Wind up a nautical-themed ramble along the Maritime Mile with a visit to SS Nomadic, the smaller cousin of the Titanic, and a ship which serves as a fascinating time capsule back to the pomp and grandeur of the Titanic, while also telling its own stories of service in both World Wars. There’s just enough time to give the 10-metre long Salmon of Knowledge sculpture a quick peck for luck, before continuing to explore. A stark barbed wire and graffitied sheet metal barrier marks an abrupt scar through the city’s residential areas. The Peace Line was constructed during the height of the Troubles, when Belfast was plagued by sectarian divisions between Protestants and Catholics. Nowadays, you can jump in a black taxi tour to see the colourful murals and living history of the walls, which stand as a stark reminder of the fragility of peace. After exploring the city’s historic divisions, a reminder of Belfast’s uniting creativity can be found at the Metropolitan Arts Centre – a seven-storey tall building, which invites light to gloriously cascade inside. The Cathedral Quarter is a cobbled blend of flower-adorned pubs, restaurants and theatres, and venues where music spills out onto the streets at night, and many a pint is cheerily shared.

09 Jun 2022

20

Liverpool

Who can say Liverpool without thinking of The Beatles? Home to the fab four, Penny Lane, Strawberry Fields and the Cavern Club, this northern English city is undoubtedly one of the most important places on the 20th-century music scene. Even UNESCO agrees - Liverpool became a City of Music (one of only 19 in the world) in 2015. So understandably, it’s bursting with pride. View less Not only for its most famous former residents but also its football team, its maritime heritage and its thriving cultural scene (it was Capital of Culture in 2008). A huge regeneration project over the past two decades has seen Liverpool blossom from being a below-par northern English city to a somewhere buzzing with charm. The arrival of the Tate Liverpool paved the way – quickly followed by the restoration of some 2,500 plus listed buildings (that’s more than any English city outside London). The waterfront revitalisation came next with bars, clubs, galleries and independent boutiques, giving Liverpool some of the best dining and shopping there is. Don’t leave here without tasting Scouse – a traditional beef stew – and from where Liverpudlians draw their nickname “Scousers”. Culturally speaking, Liverpool is “bang on” as Scousers would say. The three Graces (named after the Greek goddesses of charm, beauty and creativity) line the waterfront and are responsible in part for Liverpool’s second UNESCO gong as a World Heritage Site. Further afield, the lovely parks and Crosby Beach offer a welcome respite from the urban hub.

10 Jun 2022

21

Dublin, Ireland

Atmospheric cobbled streets, with buskers scraping fiddles and characterful pubs inviting passersby inside, is Dublin in a snapshot. A city of irrepressible energy and lust for life, Ireland's capital is as welcoming a place as you'll find. Horse-drawn carriages plod along cobbled centuries-old streets, blending with an easy-going, cosmopolitan outlook. Known for its fun-filled gathering of pubs, any excuse works to enjoy a celebratory toast and chat among good company. Home to perhaps the world's most famous beer - slurp perfect pourings of thick, dark Guinness - cranked out for the city's thirsty punters. Learn more of the humble pint's journey at the Guinness Storehouse. Dublin has come along way since the Vikings established a trading port here, back in the 9th Century. In the time since, the city became the British Empire's defacto second city, and the Georgian imprint still adds oodles of historic character. Learn of 1916's Easter Uprising, when the Irish rebelled and established their independence here, as you visit the infamous, haunting Kilmainham Gaol. The uprising's leaders were tried and executed in these dark confines. Dublin's St. Patrick's Cathedral has immense history below its steep spire, which dates back to 1191. There's rich literary heritage to leaf through too, and the city's streets were rendered vividly in James Joyce's classic Ullyses. The Museum of Literature celebrates the full scope of Dublin's lyrical talents. Trinity College also has a prestigious roll-call of alumni - visit to see the Book of Kells, a beautifully illustrated bible of the medieval era.

11 Jun 2022

22

Fishguard

Perched on a clifftop and stunningly picturesque, Fishguard is considered the very heart of North Pembrokeshire. A small market town that almost seems untouched by time, you’ll find clusters of quayside cottages, family businesses selling local produce and plenty of Gaelic charm! Market day falls on a Saturday and although principally food, there are some stalls selling local arts and crafts too. If you are not lucky enough to be visiting on market day, the pretty high street has some lovely shops where you can easily while away a couple of hours. Known internationally as the place of the last invasion of Britain when the French landed in 1797, the village heaves with history. Historians will of course already know that the two-day invasion soon failed and the peace treaty was signed in the Royal Oak pub in the market square. Over 200 years later the pub still stands and is perhaps one of the best places to soak up the local charm! The real stars of the show here however are the lovely surroundings. The calm waters are perfect for kayaking while walkers will love the national parks that are filled with signposted trails for all levels of ability. Cyclist of all levels will also be pleased; Fishguard and its surroundings do have a few hills, but also lots of straight roads that offer a gentle visit of the stunning landscape. If staying on the water is more your style, then boat trips to see the rest of the lovely coastline can be easily organised in port. If all the activity gets too much for you then why not enjoy a delicious local welsh cake in one of the pretty cafes or head to the town hall and have a look at the 100 foot long Last Invasion Tapestry, a humorous and entertaining story in a Bayeux tapestry style of the 1797 invasion of mainland Britain.

12 Jun 2022

23

Falmouth, England

England’s Cornish coast is often touted as being one of the loveliest on earth, and Falmouth is testament to that. A lovely jumble of traditional seaside charm, long stretches of sandy beach and quintessential Britishness, Falmouth offers much in the way of entertainment. Think bags of style, a community spirit and a modern, arty, edge, and you have just about summed Falmouth up. It was recently voted as the UK’s best town to live, so it must be doing something right! With Falmouth, appearances can be deceptive – while one might think it is a twee seaside village that owes its livelihood to tourism, it is actually a university town, full of art galleries, independent book shops and of course buzzing bars and restaurants. Get a taste of the student life by wandering the seafront and the Prince of Wales Pier, ice-cream in hand. While the town might have embraced its future, its past is still very relevant. A major port in the 18-century the National Maritime Museum has a great deal of history on offer. For those who want to stretch their legs further afield and really enjoy the glorious English countryside, why not indulge your senses with a coastal trek along the Lizard Peninsula. Beautifully bordered by sea and open landscapes, expect to see tiny fishing villages hidden in their coves, dramatic coastal landscapes and even the Lizard Lighthouse, one of Marconi’s experimental wireless stations. Don’t forget to get yourself a cream tea – a Cornish institution – to congratulate yourself at the end!

13 Jun 2022

24

At Sea

14 Jun 2022

25

London (Greenwich), England

Centuries-old architecture shares an instantly recognisable skyline with the modern metallic and glass shards of skyscrapers in London, a city of endless history and tradition. Arrive at the centre of it all, below the watch of one of the most famous bridges in the world, Tower Bridge. From here, you can begin a tour of iconic landmarks, and discover why England’s capital is one of the most visited, adored and adulated cities. So much to see, so little time. The traditional and contemporary go hand in hand in London like nowhere else. Ascend the London Eye, for a birds-eye view of the city, before wandering across the Thames's wide flow to the Gothic architecture of the Houses of Parliament, and the rise of Big Ben’s unmistakable clocktower. A hefty sprinkle of royal pageantry awaits at Buckingham Palace, where red-jacketed soldiers stomp sternly and solemnly in their duty, during ceremonies to mark the changing of the guards. Close to Tower Bridge, you’ll find the Tower of London's historic fortress, palace and prison, while bustling central markets like Borough Market offer a taste of flavours from around the world. Sweeping green spaces like Hyde Park provide spacious relief from the skyscrapers, while world-class museums exhibit finely curated exhibitions from across the world, covering the entire scope of human history and invention, as well as the natural world. Greenwich’s leafy parks and centres of refined study are close by, or a boat ride along the Thames will introduce you to this megacity from the perspective of the water.

15 Jun 2022

(This holiday is generally suitable for persons with reduced mobility. For customers with reduced mobility or any medical condition that may require special assistance or arrangements to be made, please notify your Cruise Concierge at the time of your enquiry, so that we can provide specific information as to the suitability of the holiday, as well as make suitable arrangements with the Holiday Provider on your behalf).

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