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Extraordinary Discoveries

6th January 2023 FOR 140 NIGHTS | Seabourn Sojourn

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This fly cruise holiday is financially protected by SEABOURN under ATOL 6294

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World Cruise - Extraordinary Discoveries | Visit 61 cities in 32 countries | Includes private car transfers door-to-door between home and airport, Business Class flights, overseas transfers, one-night pre-cruise hotel stay in Miami with Gala Bon Voyage dinner, personal valet luggage shipping between home and ship in Miami and Barcelona, $4,000 FREE to spend on-board per couple, unlimited internet package, unlimited laundry, dry cleaning and pressing on board, exclusive World Cruise events, exclusive World Cruise President's event and special World Cruise pillow gifts

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1) All guests need to be in possession of a valid UK passport. This is also the case on any British Isles cruises. Please click here to check your passport will still be valid on your dates of travel.

2) Please check your travel insurance meets any criteria as specified by your cruise line. You can check your cruise line requirements here. For a travel insurance quote click here. Proof of travel insurance may be required on boarding.

3) Please check the vaccination and testing requirements from the FCDO, your cruise line and any destination countries here

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itinerary

1

Miami, Florida00:00 - 17:00

Miami is one of the world’s most popular holiday spots. It has so much to offer; from its countless beach areas, to culture and museums, from spa and shopping days out, to endless cuban restaurants and cafes. Miami is a multicultural city that has something to offer to everyone.

06 Jan 2023

2

Key West, Florida07:00 - 16:00

Located closer to Havana than Miami, Key West is synonymous for all that is fabulous. Whether it’s beaches, back country or just a brilliant time that you’re after, Florida’s most southern point holds a wealth of intrigue, both past and present. Famed for its unique originality, Key West is a condensation of the best of the sunshine state – fantastic weather, laid back attitude, deep-rooted history and masses of fantastic, fresh seafood; it’s little wonder that nobody ever wants to leave.Floating in the middle of the Gulf of Mexico, the island has two very definite personalities: bookish and bizarre. On the one hand, the literary festivals, exquisite Caribbean architecture and splendid art galleries attract the bourgeoisie, while on the other, the eccentricity and reticence to be associated with “the mainland” attracts all kinds of “happies” –new era hippies. The two dichotomies live peacefully side by side and have done ever since travellers started arriving in the 1960s — Key West being one of the three big K’s on the hippie path to enlightenment (Kuta and Kathmandu are the others).But past the idiosyncrasies of the Key Westers, and you will find an island that is literally brimming over with spectacular sights and wonderful wilderness. From Henry S. Truman’s Little White House and Ernest Hemmingway’s house and studio, to botanical gardens and marine sanctuaries, visitors will leave this fascinating island wanting more.Best seen by foot, bike or boat, this is an island to be explored al fresco.

07 Jan 2023

3

At Sea

08 Jan 2023

4

Belize City08:00 - 17:00

Belize City is more of a town than a city—few of the ramshackle buildings here are taller than a palm tree, and the official population within the city limits is barely over 50,000, though the metro population is near 90,000. Not far beyond the city center, streets give way to two-lane country roads where animals outnumber people. Any dining room downtown could leave the impression that everybody knows everybody else in this town, and certainly among the elite who can afford to dine out, that's probably true.On a map Belize City appears to be an ideal base for exploring the central part of the country—it's two hours or less by car to San Ignacio, Corozal Town, Dangriga, and even less to Altun Ha, Belmopan, and the Belize Zoo. However, many old Belize hands will advise you to get out of Belize City as quickly as you can. They point to the high crime rate and to drugs and gang activity. They also note the relative lack of attractions in Belize City. There are no good beaches in or near the city, except for one man-made beach at the Old Belize facility west of town, built to attract cruise-ship visitors. Although you can sometimes spot manatees and porpoises in the harbor, and birding around the city is surprisingly good, this is not the wild rain forest visitors come to see.All of that is true enough, and certainly any visitor to Belize City should take the usual precautions for travel in an impoverished urban area, which includes always taking a cab at night (and in rough parts of the city anytime), but Belize City does have an energy and excitement to it. There are good restaurants, including the best Chinese and Indian food in the country, a vibrant arts community, and, outside some of the rougher parts of town on the South Side, nice residential areas and a number of pleasant hotels and B&Bs. Belize City offers the most varied shopping in the country, and it’s the only place to find sizeable supermarkets, department stores, and the Belizean version of big box stores. There is always some little treasure to be discovered in a shop with mostly junk. All in all, it's far more interesting than any modern mall.Belize City also has an easygoing sociability. People meet on the street, talk, joke, laugh, and debate. Despite the Belize City streetscape's sometimes sketchy appearance, people in the shops and on the street tend to be friendly, polite, and helpful.If you haven't spent time in Belize City, you simply won't understand Belize. Belize City is the commercial, social, sports, and cultural hub of the country. It's even the political hub, despite the fact that the capital, Belmopan, is an hour west. The current prime minister, Dean Barrow, a lawyer who came to power in 2008, former prime ministers including Said Musa, many of the other ministers, and nearly all of the country's movers and shakers live in or near Belize City.One longtime Belize resident says that despite its problems she enjoys making day trips to the city and always encourages visitors to spend some time there: "Being a landlubber, I enjoy the boats, seabirds, and smell of the salt air, and of course the Swing Bridge, watching the fishermen on fishing boats sell their fish, and seeing what fish and sea creatures are for sale in the market. When I first came here I was amazed at the fish and meat stalls, at how they were out in the open, and weren't refrigerated like back home. I think it's good for tourists to see that there are other ways of living than what they are used to. Isn't that the point of traveling?"Still—and we can’t overemphasize this—you do have to be careful, as crime is not limited just to certain areas: When you’re in Belize City, bring your street smarts and exercise caution at all times.

09 Jan 2023

5

Santo Tomás de Castilla08:00 - 18:00

Guatemala's short Caribbean shoreline doesn't generate the buzz of those of neighboring Belize and Mexico. The coast weighs in at a scant 74 mi (123 km), and this mostly highland country wears its indigenous culture on its sleeve and has historically looked inland rather than to the sea. You'll be drawn inland, too, with a variety of shore excursions. This is the land of the Maya, after all. But there's plenty to keep you occupied here in the lowlands. Tourist brochures tout the Caribbean coast as "The Other Guatemala". The predominantly indigenous and Spanish cultures of the highlands give way to an Afro-Caribbean tradition that listens more closely to the rhythms of far-off Jamaica rather than taking its cue from Guatemala City. Think of it as mixing a little reggae with your salsa.

10 Jan 2023

6

Trujillo08:00 - 17:00

The town of Trujillo is located in the western Caribbean on Honduras’ gorgeous and dramatic North Coast. Christopher Columbus landed in present-day Trujillo in 1502, during his fourth and final voyage to the New World. The Santa Bárbara Fort was constructed beginning around 1575 and provided protection for the town with its large cannons overlooking the Bay. A town plaza and park are near the fort, as is the San Juan Bautista Church. Experience the culture, the warmth, the hospitality and the seaside charm of this coastal location.

11 Jan 2023

7

At Sea

12 Jan 2023

8

Puerto Limón07:00 - 15:00

Christopher Columbus became Costa Rica's first tourist when he landed on this stretch of coast in 1502 during his fourth and final voyage to the New World. Expecting to find vast mineral wealth, he named the region Costa Rica ("rich coast"). Imagine the Spaniards' surprise eventually to find there was none. Save for a brief skirmish some six decades ago, the country did prove itself rich in a long tradition of peace and democracy. No other country in Latin America can make that claim. Costa Rica is also abundantly rich in natural beauty, managing to pack beaches, volcanoes, rain forests, and diverse animal life into an area the size of Vermont and New Hampshire combined. It has successfully parlayed those qualities into its role as one the world's great ecotourism destinations. A day visit is short, but time enough for a quick sample.

13 Jan 2023

9

Exit Panama Canal Balboa

After a thrilling day passing through the mighty, water-powered locks and jungled channels of the Panama Canal, reflect on the engineering marvel that you have experienced, as your ship glides majestically out of the canal and into your first night in the Pacific Ocean. As the first stars sparkle in the horizon, lift your glass to the bold visionaries who dreamt of such an accomplishment so long ago, and to the untold thousands who toiled to make it real. VIEW CRUISES

14 Jan 2023

10

Fuerte Amador08:00 - 18:00

Formerly a fortified armory, this newly developed port is the portal to colonial Panama City and an in-depth look at Miraflores Locks. Also from here, you can visit an Embera Indian village.

15 Jan 2023

11

Crossing The Equator

If you are a “pollywog,” who has never crossed the line at sea, you will be expected to undergo a mock trial by King Neptune and his court for the entertainment of the “shellbacks” who have already done so. Mild but hilarious indignities will be conjured, and in the end a good time will be had by most, if not all.

16 Jan 2023

12
13

Mantaundefined - 23:00

Manta is Ecuador's second largest port, north of Guayaquil which is the largest, and just south of the equator. With a population of approximately 140,000, Manta is a commercial center for fish and fruit, particularly bananas and plantains, which thrive in the tropical climate. However its beaches and quaint fishing villages have long attracted tourists. Shrimp, tuna and giant blue and striped marlin run in abundance in the waters off its coastal plain. Manta's culture is a vibrant patchwork of the heritage and traditions of the country's early Native American, Spanish and black African slave settlers.

17 Jan 2023 - 18 Jan 2023

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15

At Sea

19 Jan 2023 - 20 Jan 2023

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17

Callaoundefined - 18:00

When people discuss great South American cities, Lima is often overlooked. But Peru's capital can hold its own against its neighbors. It has an oceanfront setting, colonial-era splendor, sophisticated dining, and nonstop nightlife.It's true that the city—clogged with traffic and choked with fumes—doesn't make a good first impression, especially since the airport is in an industrial neighborhood. But wander around the regal edifices surrounding the Plaza de Armas, among the gnarled olive trees of San Isidro's Parque El Olivar, or along the winding lanes in the coastal community of Barranco, and you'll find yourself charmed.In 1535 Francisco Pizarro found the perfect place for the capital of Spain's colonial empire. On a natural port, the so-called Ciudad de los Reyes (City of Kings) allowed Spain to ship home all the gold the conquistador plundered from the Inca. Lima served as the capital of Spain's South American empire for 300 years, and it's safe to say that no other colonial city enjoyed such power and prestige during this period.When Peru declared its independence from Spain in 1821, the declaration was read in the square that Pizarro had so carefully designed. Many of the colonial-era buildings around the Plaza de Armas are standing today. Walk a few blocks in any direction for churches and elegant houses that reveal just how wealthy this city once was. But the poor state of most buildings attests to the fact that the country's wealthy families have moved to neighborhoods to the south over the past century.The walls that surrounded the city were demolished in 1870, making way for unprecedented growth. A former hacienda became the graceful residential neighborhood of San Isidro. In the early 1920s the construction of tree-lined Avenida Arequipa heralded the development of neighborhoods such as bustling Miraflores and bohemian Barranco.Almost a third of the country's population of 29 million lives in the metropolitan area, many of them in relatively poor conos: newer neighborhoods on the outskirts of the city. Most residents of those neighborhoods moved there from mountain villages during the political violence and poverty that marked the 1980s and ’90s, when crime increased dramatically. During the past decade the country has enjoyed peace and steady economic growth, which have been accompanied by many improvements and refurbishment in the city. Residents who used to steer clear of the historic center now stroll along its streets. And many travelers who once would have avoided the city altogether now plan to spend a day here and end up staying two or three.

21 Jan 2023 - 22 Jan 2023

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22

At Sea

23 Jan 2023 - 27 Jan 2023

23
24

Hangaroa, Easter Islandundefined - 18:00

Discovered (by the Western world) on Easter Sunday, 1722, Easter Island is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of the most isolated places on the face of the Earth, some 2,300 miles from the Chilean mainland. Although more Polynesian than South American in character, the 64-square mile island was annexed by Chile in 1888, and is now famous as the world’s largest ‘open air museum’ on account of the Moai, or human-like stone statues, that can be found on the island. The Moai remain very much a mystery, which archaeologists are still trying to unlock by interpreting an ancient language of the Rapa Nui, which is the key to understanding this culture, and is written on the so called ‘rongo rongo tablets’. The island owes its origin to three volcanoes which erupted some three million years ago: Poike, Rano Kau and Maunga Terevaka. It is not known when or how the island was first populated, but the most credible theory suggests that the Rapa Nui people came from other Pacific islands in the 4th century AD. In addition to the cultural and archaeological interest, there are the beautiful beaches, transparent waters, and coral reefs that might be expected of a Pacific Island.

28 Jan 2023 - 29 Jan 2023

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27

At Sea

30 Jan 2023 - 01 Feb 2023

28

Pitcairn Island08:00 - 17:00

With a total of 56 residents on the island, Adamstown is the capital of the Pitcairn Islands and the only populated settlement, as all of the other Pitcairn Islands are uninhabited (although were populated by Polynesians in the 11th through 15th centuries). Halfway between Peru and New Zealand, Pitcairn was the perfect hiding spot for the famed HMS Bounty mutineers and their Tahitian wives. Not only had the island been misplaced on early maps of the region, but it can also be very difficult to come ashore as large breakers tend to build up just in front of the small harbour of Bounty Bay. On shore visit the local museum that houses the HMS Bounty Bible, the historic Adamstown Church, view Fletcher Christian’s cave, or keep an eye out for the Pitcairn Reed Warbler.

02 Feb 2023

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30
31

At Sea

03 Feb 2023 - 05 Feb 2023

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33

Papeete, Tahitiundefined - 18:00

Papeete will be your gateway to the tropical paradise of French Polynesia, where islands fringed with gorgeous beaches and turquoise ocean await to soothe the soul. This spirited city is the capital of French Polynesia, and serves as a superb base for onward exploration of Tahiti – an island of breathtaking landscapes and oceanic vistas. Wonderful lagoons of crisp, clear water beg to be snorkelled, stunning black beaches and blowholes pay tribute to the island's volcanic heritage, and lush green mountains beckon you inland on adventures, as you explore extraordinary Tahiti. Visit to relax inside picturesque stilted huts, which stand out over shimmering water, as you settle into the intoxicating rhythm of life, in this Polynesian paradise.

06 Feb 2023 - 07 Feb 2023

34

Bora-Bora08:00 - 17:00

Simply saying the name Bora Bora is usually enough to induce gasps of jealousy, as images of milky blue water, sparkling white beaches and casually leaning palm trees immediately spring to mind. The imagination doesn't lie, either, and if you visit, you’ll soon realise this island is every bit as gorgeous as you ever imagined. Thatched wooden huts stand out over shallow, sparkling seawater, with vivid fish swirling just below. Soak up the sun, scuba dive, or simply revel in the opulent luxury of one of the island's many magnificent resorts. If blissful inactivity doesn't appeal, then get active, and hike the greenery of the sharp Mount Pahia.

08 Feb 2023

35

At Sea

09 Feb 2023

36

Rarotonga08:00 - 17:00

Life is laid back on Rarotonga, the most populous of the Cook Islands, but the residents are still an active bunch. Though there are plenty of white sandy beaches on which to laze—and people do, with plenty of napping— locals love to get out and move. Join them in snorkeling, diving, riding—bikes, horses, scooters—fishing, bush walking, and playing squash and tennis. Another popular, if odd, and favorite activity is lining up along the sea wall adjacent to the airport's runway to be jetblasted.

10 Feb 2023

37

Arutunga08:00 - 18:00

Aitutaki is the second largest of the Cook Islands, a “semi-atoll” consisting of a volcanic main island and a series of coral atolls, uninhabited motus and barrier reefs enclosing a spectacularly turquoise-hued, triangular lagoon of about 30 square miles. The Polynesian islanders arrived about 900 A.D., and thrived on the fertile volcanic area surrounding the hill of Maungapu. The first European contact was Captain William Bligh’s arrival on board the Bounty, in 1789. The sleepy town of Arutanga offers a charming, recently restored church, the oldest in the islands from 1828, with stained glass windows and carved woodwork. If possible, don’t miss an opportunity to hear the local choral music (either live or recorded). Cook Islanders are marvelous singers, and join in four-part harmonies that are positively spine-tingling. Along with the view from the top of Maungapu, their sound will live in your memory for a long time.

11 Feb 2023

38

At Sea

12 Feb 2023

39

Cross International Dateline

The International Date Line is an imaginary line extending from the North Pole to the South Pole through the Pacific Ocean. It serves as the 180th meridian of longitude, and is used to designate the beginning of each calendar day. As you know, each adjacent time zone on the map has an hour time difference. However, at the International Date Line, +12 hours and -12 hours meet, bringing about a 24-hour time change. So while a person standing just to the west of the line may be celebrating Christmas Eve at 6 pm, someone just to the east will already be sitting down to Christmas dinner on December 25th. Therefore, when your ship crosses this line heading west, a day is added, and while crossing in an easterly direction, a day is subtracted. Crossing the International Date Line has long been a rite of passage for sailors, who often must participate in a line-crossing ceremony to become part of the sacred "Order of the Golden Dragon", an honorary naval fraternity.

13 Feb 2023

40

Vava'u08:00 - 17:00

Nuku is a small tropical island to the west of the larger Kapa Island in the Tongan group. The vivid green vegetation of the low lying island is fringed by white sand beaches that were likely formed by centuries of bright white coral skeletons being eroded into sand grains by waves and time. Living coral reefs surround the tear-drop shaped island of Nuku with a kaleidoscope of color and diverse marine life.

14 Feb 2023

41

Nuku'alofa08:00 - 23:00

Nukualofa is the capital city of the Kingdom of Tonga, a group of islands in the South Pacific. The islands of Tonga are lined with coral reefs and white sand beaches, and are protected by picturesque lagoons and limestone cliffs. Tonga is also one of the very few places in the world where visitors have the opportunity to swim with whales in the tropical ocean waters.

15 Feb 2023

42

Nuku 'Alofa

The capital of Tonga is on Tongatapu, its largest island. Learn about the history and heritage of the Tongans at the Tonga Cultural Centre, a complex of traditional buildings holding museums and artisans workshops where traditional crafts are made. In the nearby village of Mu’a, see the marvelously crafted stone tombs of Tongan kings from the past.

16 Feb 2023

43

Suva07:00 - 23:00

Fiji is a collection of tropical islands in the South Pacific and is well known for soft coral diving, white sandy beaches, and idyllic and peaceful surroundings. Because of its paradisiac surroundings, Fiji is a popular location for weddings and honeymoons. Suva is the capital of the Fiji archipelago, located on the southeastern coast of the island of Viti Levu and is the second most populated city of Fiji.

17 Feb 2023

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Dravuni Island07:00 - 17:00

Think island paradise anywhere in the world and you will almost certainly conjure up images of Dravuni Island. Shallow limpid seas surround palm tree fringed beaches that encircle the whole island bar the extremities. One of the 110 inhabited islands in the Kadavu archipelago with just 125 residents, Dravuni could be considered Fiji’s mischievous little brother. Smaller, much more manageable and far less touristy than Fiji, do not expect to find an infrastructure of hotels and car hire businesses. A village school and meeting house are perhaps the sum total of civilization here, but the exceptionally friendly welcome from the residents by far makes up for any lack of modern comforts. Instead this special little island has transparent seas that are unsurprisingly a snorkeller’s dream come true. A kaleidoscopic vision of colour thrives beneath the surface and is quite literally a visual feast for the eyes. However, for those who prefer their exploration to be land based, then the views from Hilltop Island are incredible, with the awe-inspiring panoramic vistas well worth the 20-minute hike. Dravuni also holds the auspicious title of being the northern most island of the Great Astrolabe Reef, where, according to legend there used to be a village that sunk into the sea. In order to honour the legend, villagers who fish here respect the story by not throwing garbage overboard.

18 Feb 2023 - 19 Feb 2023

46

Port Vila10:00 - 19:00

Vanuatu is an island nation located in the southern Pacific Ocean. The archipelago, which is of volcanic origin, is approximately 1,090 miles (about 1,750 kilometres) east of northern Australia, approximately 310 miles (about 500 kilometres) northeast of New Caledonia, west of Fiji and southeast of the Solomon Islands, near New Guinea. Located on Mélé Bay along the southwest coast of Éfaté, Port Vila is the capital and largest city of Vanuatu, as well as its commercial and economic centre. Although Port Vila's British and French influences are apparent, its multinational population includes ni-Vanuatu, British, French, Chinese, and Vietnamese citizens. An active commercial port, the city is home to hospitals, hotels, casinos, markets and shopping districts, a sports stadium, cultural centre, teacher-training institution, campus of the University of the South Pacific, and several meat- and fish-processing plants. The municipality of Port Vila is divided into four wards, Malapoa-Tagabe, Anabrou-Melcofe-Tassiriki, Centre and South. The area occupied by Port Vila has been inhabited by Melanesian people for thousands of years. In 2004, an archaeological expedition unearthed a burial site with 25 tombs, skeletons and pieces of ceramic pottery dating from 1300 B.C. The Vanuatu Islands first had contact with Europeans in 1606 with the arrival of Portuguese explorer Pedro Fernandes de Queirós. Europeans did not return until 1768, when Louis Antoine de Bougainville rediscovered the islands. In 1774, Captain Cook called the islands the 'New Hebrides', a name that would last until their independence in 1980. In 1825, sandalwood was discovered on the island of Erromango, prompting a rush of immigrants that included Catholic and Protestant missionaries from European and North America, as well as settlers looking for land to farm cotton, coffee, cocoa, bananas, and coconuts. British subjects from Australia made up the majority of settlers, but the establishment of the Caledonian Company of the New Hebrides in 1882 attracted more French subjects. The land around Port Vila was converted into the municipality of Franceville in 1889. By the start of the 20th century, the French outnumbered the British, and the two nations agreed to govern the islands jointly by way of the British-French Condominium. During World War II, Port Vila was an American and Australian airbase. The New Hebrides National Party was established in the early-1970s. Renamed Vanua'aku Pati in 1974, the party pushed for independence. In 1980, amidst the brief Coconut War, the Republic of Vanuatu was created. The economies of Port Vila and Vanuatu are supported by the agriculture, offshore financial services and cattle industries. However, the abundant tropical beauty of Vanuatu has made Port Vila a popular tourist destination for outdoor and nature enthusiasts alike. Renowned for its tropical climate and exquisite, white-sand beaches and world-class fishing, the archipelago is a region of spectacular geographic diversity that includes spectacular volcanoes, mountains and valleys, along with idyllic jungles, rainforests, botanical gardens, mineral springs, and waterfalls. What's more, Port Vila offers easy access to exploring the city, Vanuatu and the offshore islands that comprise this wonderful South Pacific island chain. Port Vila consists of a diverse blend of Melanesian, Eastern and Western cultures that presents a unique opportunity to discover the people, traditions and history of Vanuatu. Cultural village tours are a fantastic way to meet the locals and experience indigenous lifestyles and customs through storytelling, music, dance, kava-tasting, and a traditional Melanesian feast. The evolution of Port Vila and Vanuatu can be explored during visits to the Vanuatu Cultural Centre and Museum features a collection of historical artefacts from the Vanuatu Island. Additional historic landmarks include Independence Park, the French and British residencies, Supreme Court, Georges Pompidou Building, World War I and II memorials, Tanna Coffee-Roasting Factory, and more. Vanuatu's verdant canyons, jungle-covered mountain peaks, volcanoes, waterfalls, botanical gardens, mineral springs, white-sand beaches, and rainforests invite a wide array of picturesque, memorable and exciting sightseeing venues for outdoor enthusiasts. Land-based excursions include bird-watching, bicycling and motor-biking, eco-tours, hiking through jungle and rainforest nature trails, horseback-riding at the nearby Sea Horse Ranch or Club Hippique Adventure Park, helicopter or seaplane flight-seeing, dune-bugging the beaches and jungles, 'zorbing' down the hillsides, abseiling down a cascading waterfall, volcano trekking and sandboarding, zip-lining through the jungle canopy, and golfing at the stunningly beautiful Port Vila Golf and Country Club, the only 18-hole championship course in Vanuatu and home to the PGA-sanctioned Vanuatu Open. Picturesque and fun-filled water-based excursions include swimming, boating and sailing along the exquisite coast of Port Vila and Vanuatu, deep-sea fishing for enormous dolphin, marlin, wahoo, dorado, tuna, swordfish, and sailfish, jet-skiing and high-speed jet-boating, stand-up paddle-boarding, surfing, kite-surfing, and parasailing. The archipelago also offers some of the world's finest snorkelling and diving at venues such as the Hideaway Islands Marine Reserves, JoJo Beach Club, Havannah Beach and Boat Club, and Iririki Island.Due to its compact size, Port Vila can be easily explored in just a single day.

20 Feb 2023

47

Champagne Bay, Espiritu Santo Island10:00 - 17:00

The Vanuatu archipelago, consisting of 13 large islands and 60 smaller islands stretches for 450 miles through the southwest Pacific Ocean. Formerly known as New Hebrides, the name was changed to Vanuatu when the nation gained independence in 1980. An abundance of vividly colored flowers brighten the islands along with fifty-four types of native birds, among them green pigeons and multihued parrots. The warm waters, calm lagoons and miles of beautiful beaches provide the visitor to this off-the-beaten-path island with a perfect setting for a variety of recreational activities.

21 Feb 2023

48

Champagne Beach, Vanuatu

On the north shore of Vanuatu’s large island of Espiritu Santo is a beautiful pink-tinged sand beach ringing a clear warm lagoon. A freshwater spring bubbles up through the volcanic rock substrate beneath the bay, and at low tide this phenomenon creates tingling bubbles like a geothermal spa. Thus the name. Your ship will anchor offshore, and you can take a tender ashore to bask and swim or snorkel in the bay or follow one of the short trails into the surrounding forest. Local craftspeople will be there to offer handwoven mats or other crafts, and perhaps cold drinks. The site is one from a South Pacific dream, and sufficient unto itself.

22 Feb 2023

49

Tavanipupu Island08:00 - 17:00

23 Feb 2023

50

Honiara, Guadalcanal Island08:00 - 18:00

Honiara is the capital city of the Solomon Islands on the north-western coast of Guadalcanal Island. It is the hub of all activity in the archipelago which has recently undergone an ‘urban boom’. Discover the cities beautiful landscapes and the significance of the city in the World War II.

24 Feb 2023

51

Honiara

The Solomon Islands is a sovereign nation consisting of multiple island groups, scattered in the South Pacific east of Papua New Guinea. Its capital is Honiara, on the island of Guadalcanal. Many of the outlying islands in the nation are relatively untouched, but Honiara is a busier hub of international commerce. The islands’ recent history is scarred by the desperate battles fought between the Japanese and American forces during World War II. In 1942, the Japanese launched their last great land offensive in the islands, which culminated in the Battle of Henderson Field fought at Honiara. Of the estimated 36,000 Japanese troops on Guadalcanal at the beginning, only 1,000 survived, the rest having either been killed directly, or succumbed to disease and starvation. Ghostly evidence of this horrific warfare dots the island, and it is memorialized at the American Memorial overlooking the town and at a smaller Solomons Peace Memorial erected by the Japanese outside the city. On a lighter note, traditional arts and crafts are on display at the National Museum, which also boasts a display of eight traditional Melanesian houses from various parts of the country. Behind the museum is a cultural center. Above town there is a pleasant botanical garden, and the bustling Central Market is a great place to get a feel for everyday life in Honiara. Although English is the official language, only a small percentage of Solomonese speak it. The common language is Pijin.

25 Feb 2023

52

Alotau10:00 - 18:00

Alotau is the provincial capital of the Milne Bay Province located in the southeast bay of Papua New Guinea. The town and surrounding area has been an important staging ground during World War II and we will see remains and memorials dating back or referring to the war. On a tour of the town, visitors will appreciate lovely vistas of the bay and experience the markets, which are frequented not only by locals, but also by islanders selling their products or looking for produce to take back into Milne Bay. Alotau is an important port facility for the islands and attracts many vendors of handicrafts from different islands.

26 Feb 2023

53

Kitava08:00 - 17:00

Alotau, Papua New Guinea. Alotau is the capital of the Milne Bay province of Papua New Guinea, located on a peninsula in Milne Bay in the Coral Sea. The town and water comprise the site of the 1942 battle of Milne Bay, in which the invading Japanese army suffered its first decisive defeat in the Pacific Theater of World War II at the hands of Allied, mostly Australian forces. A War Memorial commemorates the battle. Today the area is largely given over the palm oil plantations. The local people keep their Tawala cultural traditions alive, with the exception of the long-past ritual cannibalism. In Bibiko Village, they will be pleased to show them off in displays of prowess with Kundu drum ceremonies and exhibitions of their impressive war canoes. At the Ahioma village of Dodobana, the many specialized skills of daily Melanesian life are demonstrated in a family-style setting, such as basket weaving, grass skirt making and gardening.

27 Feb 2023

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Conflict Island Group08:00 - 17:00

Kitava is a small, unspoiled island in the Trobriand Islands group in the Solomon Sea. Its undiluted, Eden-like nature is a big part of its appeal. Visitors are treated hospitably and usually greeted with traditional dancing on the white beaches. Local crafts such as quality woodcarvings of masks, bowl and animal figures, woven baskets and other local items are offered near the landing site. Local people are also available and happy to guide visitors to the Kumagea village and show their lifestyle including the large yam gardens and the yam houses where they are stored. European scientists have conducted extensive studies of the traditional local diet, which keeps the islanders unusually healthy. They will probably also show you the ‘skull caves” related to traditional burial practices. For small fee, local boats will take to you the nearby atolls such as Nurata for very scenic snorkeling in clear, warm water. Many visitors bring small gifts such as books, pencils or little toys for the children. After asking permission of the parents, these are generally gratefully accepted.

28 Feb 2023

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Conflict Islands, Papua New Guinea

Don’t let the name scare you. This idyllic archipelago of 21 coral atolls off the coast of New Guinea was named after the British ship HMS Conflict by its discoverer, a most patriotic captain. You could hardly ask for a more conflict-free paradise. The island group is privately owned by a passionate conservationist, who insists on sustainable methods for any activity within his tropical domain. Activities are therefore tailored for enjoying the exceptionally beautiful beaches, the supremely biodiverse coral reefs and the clear, warm waters. Kayaking, snorkeling and paddle-boarding are the more strenuous varieties. Simply relaxing mindfully on the sugary fringes of the lagoon are also acceptable. The area is under consideration for UNESCO World Heritage inscription.

01 Mar 2023

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Cairns, Queensland08:00 - 18:00

Tourism is the lifeblood of Cairns (pronounced Caans). The city makes a good base for exploring the wild top half of Queensland, and tens of thousands of international travelers use it as a jumping-off point for activities such as scuba diving and snorkeling trips to the Barrier Reef, as well as boating, fishing, parasailing, scenic flights, and rain-forest treks.It's a tough environment, with intense heat and fierce wildlife. Along with wallabies and grey kangaroos in the savannah and tree kangaroos in the rain forest, you'll find stealthy saltwater crocodiles, venomous snakes, and jellyfish so deadly they put the region’s stunning beaches off- limits to swimmers for nearly half the year. Yet despite this formidable setting, Cairns and tropical North Queensland are far from intimidating places. The people are warm and friendly, the sights spectacular, and—at the right time of year—the beachside lounging is world-class.

02 Mar 2023

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Cairns, Australia

A cosmopolitan city flanked by pristine rainforests and golden beaches, Cairns is the gateway to the Great Barrier Reef, Kuranda, and the Daintree rainforest, a World Heritage protected area. The city was recently renovated to enhance its image and provide a relaxing place for visitors and locals to congregate and have fun. Cairns Esplanade, once a huge grassy park, now features an excellent facility incorporating an outdoor amphitheatre, a sandy swimming lagoon, walking tracks, shops and restaurants, and an environmental interpretation center.

03 Mar 2023

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At Sea

04 Mar 2023 - 05 Mar 2023

60

Sydney, New South Wales07:00 - 23:00

Sydney belongs to the exclusive club of cities that generate excitement. At the end of a marathon flight there's renewed vitality in the cabin as the plane circles the city, where thousands of yachts are suspended on the dark water and the sails of the Opera House glisten in the distance. Blessed with dazzling beaches and a sunny climate, Sydney is among the most beautiful cities on the planet.With 4.6 million people, Sydney is the biggest and most cosmopolitan city in Australia. A wave of immigration from the 1950s has seen the Anglo-Irish immigrants who made up the city's original population joined by Italians, Greeks, Turks, Lebanese, Chinese, Vietnamese, Thais, and Indonesians. This intermingling has created a cultural vibrancy and energy—and a culinary repertoire—that was missing only a generation ago.Sydneysiders embrace their harbor with a passion. Indented with numerous bays and beaches, Sydney Harbour is the presiding icon for the city, and urban Australia. Captain Arthur Phillip, commander of the 11-ship First Fleet, wrote in his diary when he first set eyes on the harbor on January 26, 1788: "We had the satisfaction of finding the finest harbor in the world."Although a visit to Sydney is an essential part of an Australian experience, the city is no more representative of Australia than Los Angeles is of the United States. Sydney has joined the ranks of the great cities whose characters are essentially international. What Sydney offers is style, sophistication, and great looks—an exhilarating prelude to the continent at its back door.

06 Mar 2023

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Sydney (Australia)

Sydney is a cosmopolitan, multicultural city surrounded by golden sand beaches, World Heritage areas, lush national parks and acclaimed wine regions. Sydney owes much of its splendor to its magnificent harbor. Arriving by ship provides an unequaled impression, showing off the city's famous landmarks: the dramatic white sails of the iconic Opera House and the celebrated Harbor Bridge, looming over the skyline.

07 Mar 2023

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Phillip Island, Victoria12:00 - 23:00

Your first sight of Phillip Island's prize asset - its parade of adorable penguins skipping across the sand - will be just one of many unforgettable experiences from your time on this stunning island. Located just to the south of cultured Melbourne, the southern ocean’s rollers have hewn a rugged, dramatic shoreline here, and you’ll be itching to explore as soon as you lay eyes upon it.

08 Mar 2023

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Melbourne, Victoriaundefined - 18:00

Consistently rated among the "world's most livable cities" in quality-of-life surveys, Melbourne is built on a coastal plain at the top of the giant horseshoe of Port Phillip Bay. The city center is an orderly grid of streets where the state parliament, banks, multinational corporations, and splendid Victorian buildings that sprang up in the wake of the gold rush now stand. This is Melbourne's heart, which you can explore at a leisurely pace in a couple of days.In Southbank, one of the newer precincts south of the city center, the Southgate development of bars, restaurants, and shops has refocused Melbourne's vision on the Yarra River. Once a blighted stretch of factories and run-down warehouses, the southern bank of the river is now a vibrant, exciting part of the city, and the river itself is finally taking its rightful place in Melbourne's psyche.Just a hop away, Federation Square—with its host of galleries—has become a civic landmark for Melburnians. Stroll along the Esplanade in the suburb of St. Kilda, amble past the elegant houses of East Melbourne, enjoy the shops and cafés in Fitzroy or Carlton, rub shoulders with locals at the Victoria Market, nip into the Windsor for afternoon tea, or rent a canoe at Studley Park to paddle along one of the prettiest stretches of the Yarra—and you may discover Melbourne's soul as well as its heart.

09 Mar 2023 - 10 Mar 2023

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Melbourne

Located at the mouth of the Yarra River, Melbourne was founded by free settlers in 1835, 47 years after the first European settlement in Australia. Transformed rapidly into a major metropolis by the Victorian gold rush in the 1850s, Melbourne became Australia's largest and most important city, and by 1865 was the second largest city in the British Empire. Today, Melbourne is a major center of commerce, industry and cultural activity, and is consistently ranked as one of the most livable cities in the world.

11 Mar 2023

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Adelaide, South Australia08:00 - 23:00

Australians think of Adelaide as a city of churches, but Adelaide has outgrown its reputation as a sleepy country town dotted with cathedrals and spires. The Adelaide of this millennium is infinitely more complex, with a large, multiethnic population and thriving urban art and music scenes supported by a "space activation program" that encourages pop-up shops, markets, performances, street food, mini festivals, art exhibitions, and other "off-the-cuff" experiences in the cities underutilized streets and public spaces.Bright and clean, leafy and beautiful Adelaide is a breeze to explore, with a grid pattern of streets encircled by parkland. The heart of the greenbelt is divided by the meandering River Torrens, which passes the Festival Centre in its prettiest stretch.

12 Mar 2023

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Kangaroo Island, South Australia07:00 - 17:00

Kangaroo Island is with 1,740 square miles the third largest island off the coast of Australia. It is 96 miles long and 34 miles wide, and known for its outstanding natural beauty. Due to its remote location, Kangaroo Island was less affected than the mainland by the impact of European development. To this day, the island is rich in diverse flora and fauna seldom found elsewhere. As one of the world’s last unspoiled wilderness places, about 30 percent of the island has been designated as National Parks. The most important one is Flinders Chase at the western end of Kangaroo Island, with Seal Bay Conservation Park following close behind. Its large sandy beach and dune area is home to Australian sea lions where they come to rest and nurse their young. Kingscote, formerly known as Queenscliffe, is the largest town on the island and its main supply depot. Tourism is a significant element in the local economy. A mix of attractive small townships, wildlife sanctuaries and fascinating wilderness areas guarantee a steady stream of visitors each year.

13 Mar 2023

68

Penneshaw (Kangaroo Island)

Australia’s third-largest sea island, after Tasmania and Melville Island, is a haven for wildlife and a popular escape for nature-loving mainlanders from Adelaide and Melbourne. Seabourn Sojourn’s call will occur during the annual birthing season of the New Zealand sea lion and Australian fur seal colonies on the nearby beach conservation areas. Marine tours seek the playful porpoises and dolphins offshore, while land-based excursions visit preserves for koalas and wallabies, as well as the popular local wineries.

14 Mar 2023

69

At Sea

15 Mar 2023

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Albany, Western Australia10:00 - 23:00

Proclaimed a city on July 1, 1998, Albany with a population of 28,000 is rapidly expanding. It is the commercial center of Western Australia's southern region and the oldest settlement in the state, established in 1826. Boasting an excellent harbor on King George Sound led to Albany becoming a thriving whaling port. Later, when steam ships started traveling between England and Australia, Albany was an important coaling station and served as a penal and a military outpost. The coastline offers some of Australia's most rugged and spectacular scenery. At certain times of the year, whales can be spotted off the coast. Among the city's attractions are some fine old colonial buildings that reflect Albany's Victorian heritage. Various lookout points offer stunning vistas.

16 Mar 2023

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Albany,Australia

Located at the southern tip of Western Australia, Albany was the first colonial settlement in the west, founded in 1826, when Major Edmund Lockyer claimed the western third of the continent for the British Crown. It was the only deep water port on the continent’s western third until the founding of Fremantle and was crucial to the gold rush era. Several decades later, it was also the last port from which Australian troops left to join World War I, and thus integral to the ANZAC legend. Architectural heritage in Albany includes the Old Farm, Strawberry Hill, which as founded in 1827 to feed the troops, and was later a gentleman’s residence. The picturesque St. John’s Church, Town Hall and the fanciful Old Post Office each represent different traditions which thrived here. The Princess Royal Sound area is rich with natural wonders preserved in national parks. Torndirrup National Park is a granite prominence assaulted by the swells of the Southern Sea, resulting in phenomena such as the blowholes and the picturesque granite Natural Bridge.

17 Mar 2023

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Bunbury, Western Australia08:00 - 18:00

18 Mar 2023

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Perth, Western Australia07:00 - 23:00

Western Australia’s second city is a bright, pleasant place that welcomes visitors with a towering, checkerboard-patterned lighthouse. Known as the dolphin capital of Australia, the sheltered Koombana Bay draws visitors to interact with downright playful cetaceans. The nearby Geographe Wine region attracts touring tasters as well, along with the charming, rural communities such as Donnybrook, with orchards full of ripening fruit.

19 Mar 2023

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Perth (Fremantle), Australia

Historic Fremantle is the gateway port for Perth, the capital of Western Australia. Located 12 miles upriver from Fremantle on the banks of the Swan River, Perth was founded on June12, 1829 by Captain James Stirling, the political center of the free settler Swan River Colony. Perth is considered one of the most isolated metropolitan areas on Earth, with Adelaide in South Australia, the closest city with a population over one million. Perth is geographically closer to East Timor, Singapore and Jakarta than it is to Sydney or Melbourne. Today, Perth is a lively cosmopolitan city, and the Swan Valley Region is home to more that 40 vineyards, many of which are still run by their original families. Perth became known worldwide as the "City of Lights" when city residents lit their house and street lights as American astronaut John Glenn passed overhead while orbiting the earth on Friendship 7 in 1962.

20 Mar 2023

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At Sea

21 Mar 2023 - 22 Mar 2023

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Broome, Western Australia08:00 - 18:00

Traffic in the Broome Harbour (a very busy working harbour) is restricted, requiring special permits for all vehicles accessing the pier area. Guests are not permitted in this area on an individual basis. In order to make disembarkation as smooth as possible Silversea will be providing a group motorcoach transfer from the pier to the airport.  This transfer will depart shortly after the ship is cleared.  Exact timings will be communicated by the ship's staff.Guests who do not wish to go to the airport immediately following disembarkation will be transferred to Pearl Luggers, located 10 - 15 minutes from the airport, where taxis are available for hire. 

23 Mar 2023

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Broome

Isolated on the farthest northwest corner of the continent, Broome thrived from its founding in 1883 based on the bounty of South Sea pearls found in offshore oyster beds. Even today, the pearling industry is active here, though most are now cultured. But Broome has grown into one of Australia’s premier holiday destinations, offering an amazing variety of attractions and activities for visitors. It boasts a splendid, 14-mile strand of soft white sand at Cable Beach, where people flock to enjoy sunset camel rides. And with 2,600 islands in the area and warm seas, it is a sportsman’s paradise. But the unique allure of the region is the unspoiled expanse of bizarre geological formations, waterways and ancient Aboriginal lands called the Kimberley. Corrugated with red-hued cliffs and escarpments, and laced with pristine waterways, swimming holes and waterfalls, the Kimberley is unlike any other landscape on earth. It invites visitors to cruise the coast, fly over the ranges, kayak the islands and explore the rugged terrain in 4WD vehicles. The only difficulty is deciding which adventure to partake of next.

24 Mar 2023

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At Sea

25 Mar 2023

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Benoa, Baliundefined - 17:00

Bali really is as alluring as everyone says. This island, slightly bigger than Delaware, has it all: beaches, volcanoes, terraced rice fields, forests, renowned resorts, surfing, golf, and world-class dive sites. But what sets Bali apart from other nearby tropical destinations is Balinese tradition, and villagers dedicated to celebrating it. The hundreds of temples, dances, rituals, and crafts linked to their ancient Hindu faith aren't a show for tourists, but a living, breathing culture in which visitors are warmly received by the Balinese, who cherish their own identities.

26 Mar 2023 - 27 Mar 2023

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Surabaya08:00 - 17:00

Located on the southeastern coast of Bali is the small village of Tanjung Benoa. Still considered a fishing village, Benoa has developed over the past 20 years into a major player in the tourism sector. The calm waters and the beautiful white sand beaches have made Benoa the prime water sport area of Bali. Being a peninsula that is only accessible from one direction, Tanjung Benoa is still relatively quiet with a more relaxed feeling.

28 Mar 2023

83

Semarang08:00 - 19:00

Semarang is one of the oldest cities in Indonesia, situated on Java's north coast between the shore of the Java Sea and a small ridge of mountains. Ceded to the Dutch West India Company in 1677 by King Amangkurat I in payment of his debts, it became their headquarters and the seat of the Dutch governor of the northeast provinces. Semarang's usefulness as a port waned due to the gradual silting up of the harbor; by the 19th century, Surabaya had eclipsed Semarang as Java's premier port. With a population of over one million, a third of whom are thought to be of Chinese extraction, Semarang is the largest city in Central Java and its administrative capital. The city consists of two parts: the coastal lowland where most of the commercial activities are found; and the hilly residential area. Although more a business center than a city for tourists, Semarang serves as a popular gateway to the mountainous interior of Central Java and to fabled Borobudur.

29 Mar 2023

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Semarang, Indonesia

Semarang is a commercial port located roughly halfway between Jakarta and Surabaya, along Java's north central coast. Many of the island's most important exports (tobacco, sugar, rubber, coffee, and cacao) are shipped through Semarang. Because of its accessibility to the island's interior, it is an ideal gateway to the mystic Borobudur.

30 Mar 2023

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At Sea

31 Mar 2023

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Padang08:00 - 17:00

Padang is part old port town, and part modern capital of West Sumatra. Dutch colonialists traded coffee and spices from the harbor starting in the 17th century. Driving out from Padang one can reach Cupek, a Minangkabau village in Sumatra’s interior. The ancestral homelands of the Minangkabau, devout Muslims, are centered in West Sumatra’s lush highlands and stretch as far as the seashore. They claim the world’s largest matrilineal society and ownership of a family’s property—their homes, rice paddies and the like—passes from mother to daughter. Crops like rice, cabbage, beans and the all-important chilies grow in abundance, and the Minangnese are known for their spicy, sumptuous cuisine.

01 Apr 2023

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Padang Bay, Bali, Indonesia

Bali is more than a destination. It is a journey for the spirit... a place where time has never been as important as continuity. It is a sojourn for the senses that creates lasting impressions: a delicate woodcarving, a bold painting, a village procession, and the costumed dancers of the Barong. It's been called an island of temples and with more than 10,000 the title is appropriate. It is an island where rice paddies carpet the land, starting at the beaches and clinging to hillsides up to the steep slopes of Mount Agung, the "Navel of the World" and home to Bali's gods. Nowhere will you find a more exotic, spellbinding or entrancing synthesis of humanity, nature and the spiritual world.

02 Apr 2023

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At Sea

03 Apr 2023 - 08 Apr 2023

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Victoria, Mahé08:00 - 23:00

09 Apr 2023

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Praslin Island07:00 - 17:00

Forty kilometers (25 miles) northeast of Mahé, Praslin is just a 15-minute flight or 45-minute ferry ride away. Praslin, at 11 km (7 miles) long and 4 km (2.5 miles) wide, is the second-largest island in the Seychelles. First settled as a hideaway by pirates and Arab merchants, the island's original name, Isle de Palmes, bears testament to its reputation as home of the Vallée de Mai UNESCO World Heritage Site: the only place in the world where the famous Coco de Mer, the world's heaviest nut, grows abundantly in the wild. Praslin's endemic palm forests shelter many rare species, and the island is a major bird-watching destination. Surrounded by a coral reef, majestic bays, and gorgeous beaches, Praslin is much quieter and less developed than Mahé. With few real "sights," the pleasures of Praslin largely involve relaxing in or exploring its stunning beaches and fantastical forests.

10 Apr 2023 - 11 Apr 2023

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At Sea

12 Apr 2023

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Mombasaundefined - 18:00

You may well find yourself in Mombasa for a few hours or an overnight stop. The city (which is actually an island linked to the mainland by a ferry) is the second oldest trade center with Arabia and the Far East. Today it still plays an important role as the main port for Kenya. Although it lacks the beautiful beaches of the north and south, it has a rich, fascinating history. Visit the Old Town with its narrow streets lined with tiny shops and souks (markets). The Old Harbour, frequented by numerous dhows, is an ideal place to arrange a short cruise on one of these local boats that have plied the oceans for centuries. Fort Jesus, designed by an Italian and built by the Portuguese in the late 16th century, is a major visitor draw and well worth a visit. In summer there's an impressive sound-and-light show.

13 Apr 2023 - 15 Apr 2023

101

Zanzibar08:00 - 17:00

This ancient isle once ruled by sultans and slave traders served as the stepping stone into the African continent for missionaries and explorers. Today it attracts visitors intent on discovering sandy beaches, pristine rain forests, or colorful coral reefs. Once known as the Spice Island for its export of cloves, Zanzibar has become one of the most exotic flavors in travel, better than Bali or Mali when it comes to beauty that’ll make your jaw drop.Separated from the mainland by a channel only 35 km (22 miles) wide, and only 6 degrees south of the equator, this tiny archipelago—the name Zanzibar also includes the islands of Unguja (the main island) and Pemba—in the Indian Ocean was the launching base for a romantic era of expeditions into Africa. Sir Richard Burton and John Hanning Speke used it as their base when searching for the source of the Nile. It was in Zanzibar where journalist Henry Morton Stanley, perched in an upstairs room overlooking the Stone Town harbor, began his search for David Livingstone.The first ships to enter the archipelago's harbors are believed to have sailed in around 600 BC. Since then, every great navy in the Eastern Hemisphere has dropped anchor here at one time or another. But it was Arab traders who left an indelible mark. Minarets punctuate the skyline of Stone Town, where more than 90% of the residents are Muslim. In the harbor you'll see dhows, the Arabian boats with triangular sails. Islamic women covered by black boubou veils scurry down alleyways so narrow their outstretched arms could touch buildings on both sides. Stone Town received its odd name because most of its buildings were made of limestone and coral, which means exposure to salty air has eroded many foundations.The first Europeans who arrived here were the Portuguese in the 15th century, and thus began a reign of exploitation. As far inland as Lake Tanganyika, slave traders captured the residents or bartered for them from their own chiefs, then forced the newly enslaved to march toward the Indian Ocean carrying loads of ivory tusks. Once at the shore they were shackled together while waiting for dhows to collect them at Bagamoyo, a place whose name means, "here I leave my heart." Although it's estimated that 50,000 slaves passed through the Zanzibar slave market each year during the 19th century, many more died en route.Tanganyika and Zanzibar merged in 1964 to create Tanzania, but the honeymoon was brief. Zanzibar's relationship with the mainland remains uncertain as calls for independence continue. "Bismillah, will you let him go," a lyric from Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody," has become a rebel chant for Zanzibar to break from Tanzania.Zanzibar Island, locally known as Unguja, has amazing beaches and resorts, decent dive spots, acres of spice plantations, the Jozani Forest Reserve, and Stone Town. Plus, it takes little more than an hour to fly there. It's a popular spot to head post-safari.Stone Town, the archipelago's major metropolis, is a maze of narrow streets lined with houses featuring magnificently carved doors studded with brass. There are 51 mosques, 6 Hindu temples, and 2 Christian churches. And though it can rightly be called a city, much of the western part of the larger island is a slumbering paradise where cloves, as well as rice and coconuts, still grow.Although the main island of Unguja feels untouched by the rest of the world, the nearby islands of Pemba and Mnemba offer retreats that are even more remote. For many years Arabs referred to Pemba as Al Khudra, or the Green Island, and indeed it still is, with forests of king palms, mangos, and banana trees. The 65-km-long (40-mile-long) island is less famous than Unguja except among scuba divers, who enjoy the coral gardens with colorful sponges and huge fans. Archaeology buffs are also discovering Pemba, where sites from the 9th to the 15th century have been unearthed. At Mtambwe Mkuu coins bearing the heads of sultans were discovered. Ruins along the coast include ancient mosques and tombs. In the 1930s Pemba was famous for its sorcerers, attracting disciples of the black arts from as far away as Haiti. Witchcraft is still practiced, and, oddly, so is bullfighting. Introduced by the Portuguese in the 17th century, the sport has been improved by locals, who rewrote the ending. After enduring the ritual teasing by the matador's cape, the bull is draped with flowers and paraded around the village.Beyond Pemba, smaller islands in the Zanzibar Archipelago range from mere sandbanks to Changu, once a prison island and now home to the giant Aldabra tortoise, Chumbe Island, and Mnemba, a private retreat for guests who pay hundreds of dollars per day to get away from it all.

16 Apr 2023

102

Zanzibar, Tanzania

Lying in the warm waters off the coast of Tanzania is the exotic island of Zanzibar. The mere mention of this spot conjures up images of intrigue and mystery. Zanzibar's history is whispered on the tropical breezes that cool the island. They tell of the slave trade which flourished here, and of a building called the ``House of Wonders.' They tell of a time when Christian missionaries lived and worked under difficult conditions.

17 Apr 2023

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At Sea

18 Apr 2023 - 20 Apr 2023

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Durban08:00 - 23:00

Durban, a glistening jewel on the south-east coast of Africa, is the third largest city in South Africa and the major city of KwaZulu-Natal. It has been a centre of sea trade since before colonisation and now has a flourishing artistic centre, which perfectly complements the vibrant markets and rich cultures of the city. Durban’s port is a natural half-moon harbour lined with white sand and azure water, punctuated by the port’s many piers which reach into the water like the leaves of a fan. The beaches of Durban’s famous Golden Mile stretch along the harbour and are popular all year round, as travellers and locals alike enjoy Durban’s warm, humid summers and mild, dry winters.

21 Apr 2023 - 22 Apr 2023

108

Port Elizabeth08:00 - 23:00

Originally the home of the San and Khoisan people and later the Xhosa tribe, the area now known as Port Elizabeth became a landing place for passing European ships after Portuguese navigator Bartolomew Diaz arrived in Algoa Bay in 1488. As part of the Cape Colony, the British occupied the area during the Napoleonic Wars and it was they who built Fort Frederick here in 1799. Twenty-one years later 4,000 settlers arrived, becoming the first permanent British residents of South Africa and Port Elizabeth. Sir Rufane Donkin, Acting Governor of the Cape Colony, founded Port Elizabeth, naming the settlement after his late wife. The town underwent rapid growth after 1873 following the construction of the railway to Kimberley, and is now one of the country’s major seaports. Like most South African cities, miles of beautiful coastline surround Port Elizabeth. Algoa Bay combines warm water and fair breezes, making it a mecca for swimmers and water sports enthusiasts. Those interested in history can follow the Donkin Heritage Trail, past a succession of Victorian and Edwardian town houses, trim gardens and neo-Gothic churches. Just outside the town are a number of game reserves, including the famous Addo Elephant National Park.

23 Apr 2023

109

Port Elizabeth, South Africa

Port Elizabeth is one of South Africa’s largest cities, (second in area and fifth in population), stretching 16 miles along the bay named “Algoa” by the Portuguese. The name indicated that it was from here their trading ships departed for the Goa coast of India on the favorable monsoon winds. Today it is renowned as a playground on the Indian Ocean coast, the breezes attracting surfers and yachtsmen to sport in the warm seas. The 2010 FIFA World Cup was held here, and spread even further its reputation as a world-class beach resort.

24 Apr 2023

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Cape Town

Sometimes referred to as the Mother City, Cape Town is the most famous port in South Africa and is influenced by many different cultures, including Dutch, British and Malay. The port was founded in 1652 by Dutch explorer Jan Van Riebeeck, and evidence of Dutch colonial rule remains throughout the region. The port is located on one of the world's most important trade routes, and is mainly a container port and handler of fresh fruit. Fishing is another vital industry, with large Asian fishing fleets using Cape Town as a logistical repair base for much of the year. The region is famous for its natural beauty, with the imposing Table Mountain and Lions Head, as well as the many nature reserves and botanical gardens such as Kirstenbosch which boasts an extensive range of indigenous plant life, including proteas and ferns. Cape Town's weather is mercurial, and can change from beautiful sunshine to dramatic thunderstorms within a short period. A local adage is that in Cape Town you can experience four seasons in one day.

25 Apr 2023 - 27 Apr 2023

113

Lüderitz08:00 - 17:00

The reopening of the diamond mine at Elizabeth Bay 20 years ago has brought the development of tourism and fishing back to this small 19th century village on the barren, windswept Namib Desert coast. One of Namibias oddities, it has everything you'd expect from a small German town - delicatessens, coffee shops and a Lutheran church. Here, the icy but clean South Atlantic is home to seals, penguins and other marine life and the desolate beaches support flamingoes. It was founded in 1883 when Heinrich Vogelsang purchased Angra Pequena and some of the surrounding land on behalf of Adolf Lüderitz, a Hanseat from Germany, from the local Nama chief. Lüderitz began its life as a trading post, with other activities in fishing and guano-harvesting. As a sign of Luderitz's revival, 1996 staged the first traditional German Karneval since 1960.

28 Apr 2023

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Walvis Bay

Once a whaling station, Walvis Bay provides a gateway to the extraordinary desert landscapes of Namibia and is itself an area of unusual natural beauty. The showpiece of the Walvis Bay area is the natural lagoon where you can see flamingos in their thousands at certain times of the year, along with a variety of other wading birds such as the white pelican. Further inland you will find the stunning Namib Desert, which provides an unlikely home for a diverse array of wildlife. Alternatively, you could venture into the desert of Sossusvlei, whose mountainous ochre sand dunes are said to be the highest in the world, or visit the colonial town of Swakopmund.

29 Apr 2023 - 01 May 2023

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At Sea

02 May 2023 - 05 May 2023

121

Cotonou07:00 - 18:00

Tucked between Nigeria and Togo in Benin is the busy trading port of Cotonou. Named a “market town” for its coastal placement and lucrative palm oil and textile trades, Cotonou is a sprawling amorphous city, swaddled between the Atlantic coast and Lake Nakoué. Because of its especial geographical situation, Cotonou is bursting with life — visitors disembarking here will find a colourful port, alive with economic activity and very much the capital (although not in name, the official capital is Porto-Novo to the east) of the trading industry.

06 May 2023

122

Tema07:00 - 18:00

From a modest fishing port to the biggest in Ghana, Tema’s industrial activity has all but tarnished the charming, postcard scenery of the region. The neighbouring white-sanded beaches remain immaculate, still serving as a testimony of the rich variety of fishing birds that can be found in the area.In the way Mother Nature intended it, gannets, boobies and kingfishers amongst other species fish in and around the cerulean waters of the coast. A light breeze tickles the inflamed, iron-filled soil of the mainland on which the railway linking Tema to Accra lures hundreds of visitors each day. On board one of the carriages to Accra, distinctively noticeable by their painted coats of red, yellow and green that echo Ghana’s national flag, a peek out of the window will offer scenic views of the harbour and coast, as well as the large fields that separate Tema from the capital by 15 miles/25 kilometres of open space.Accra’s ambiance contrasts with the peaceful setting of Tema, but nevertheless has its own charm to be enjoyed. Through rich, contemporary monuments which recall Ghana’s 1957 independence, the Kwame Nkrumah Memorial Park is an architectural jewel which also narrates the life and exploits of the eponymous president who fought for his country’s freedom. A more casual but perhaps interesting approach to the City’s culture and history is the visit to an artisanal studio, where primary materials such as wood and metal are transformed into stunning carvings of all sorts, illustrating a traditional African belief of a new life beyond death. And for a relaxing yet enriching experience, the hospitable restaurants are always eager to share their Banku, a local dish made out of corn and served with fish or stew.Craft markets are also worth a detour and are great for cherry-picking souvenirs. Demonstrating other fine Ghanaian traditions such as leather crafting and weaving, a popular favourite is the country’s hand-made Black Soap, which is renowned for its soothing virtues.

07 May 2023

123
124

Lome07:00 - 18:00

If you're sick of the usual beach resorts, then zesty Lomé will welcome you to a coastal destination that oozes with inimitable character. The former 'Jewel of West Africa' offers some wonderful beaches, and exports its delicious bounty of cocoa, coffee and pine kernels far and wide. A disorientating place, where stuttering engines and whizzing motorbikes add a chaotic essence to the city's streets, you’ll see vendors strolling with supplies balanced improbably on their heads, along with a healthy supply of intrigue, adventure and buzzing markets. Swarms of bikes and motorbikes dominate the coastal road, which borders the huge, palm tree lined Lomé beach – but the sand is wide enough for you to relax with the road merely a distant whisper. A treasure trove of traditional masks and statues wait for you to explore inside the National Museum, while the characterful Monument de l'Independance honours the country's sacrifices in its struggle for independence, and is a suitably defiant beacon of liberation.

08 May 2023 - 09 May 2023

125
126
127

At Sea

10 May 2023 - 12 May 2023

128

Banjul08:00 - 18:00

The tiny city of Banjul is the capital of The Gambia, a country that itself is little more than the banks of the mighty river that shares its name. Situated on St Mary’s Island, where the River Gambia joins the Atlantic, Bathurst, as Banjul was previously called, was established by the British in the early nineteenth century as a naval outpost dedicated to putting a halt to the trade in human beings. In 1943, Franklin Roosevelt visited Banjul on his way to the Casablanca conference with Churchill, becoming the first serving American president to visit Africa. Today, Banjul plays host to a thriving tourist trade, thanks to its pleasant climate, and is the political centre for the oldest democracy in Africa.

13 May 2023

129
130

Dakar08:00 - 23:00

Dakar, set at the tip of the Cape Vert peninsula, is West Africa’s westernmost point and the capital of French-speaking Senegal. Although it was not founded until 1857, it is West Africa’s oldest European city and one of the most westernised. The opening of the Dakar-St Louis railway in 1885 put the town on the map; it subsequently became a French naval base and in 1904, the capital of Afrique Occidentale Française. It bears the legacy of Africa’s French colonial past, especially so in the downtown Plateau area, where the architecture is redolent of southern France. Every inch a modern city, Dakar is a frenetic buzz of activity, which can be startling. Perhaps sample the popular mint tea and try your hand at bartering in the colourful craft markets for traditional embroidery, woodcarvings, metalwork and costume jewellery.

14 May 2023 - 15 May 2023

131

Praia, Santiago Island08:00 - 18:00

Start your Expedition Cruise in Praia, the capital of Cape Verde, located in the south of Santiago Island. You can explore its old centre overlooking the ocean and its historical buildings with transom windows. In the old quarter, you can also learn about the diversity of the archipelago’s cultural origins in the Ethnographic Museum. To finish your day, head to the harbour to visit the Diogo Gomes statue, paying homage to the man who discovered the archipelago in 1460.

16 May 2023

132

Mindelo, São Vicente Island08:00 - 18:00

Your next stop will be Cape Verde’s cultural capital, Mindelo. Get along with the locals listening to the real morna in the bars of the old town and sipping the local drink, a sugarcane spirit. This island is also known by its British and Portuguese colonial architecture and pastel-coloured houses, the municipal market and the facades of the old Governor’s Palace.

17 May 2023

133

Mindelo

The most important city on the Cape Verde island of São Vicente, Mindelo originally thrived as a coal depot for steamships plying the Atlantic. With the advent of diesel engines, its importance waned, although it is still an important port for the maritime trade. The island is volcanic, dry and mostly low. The town has replica of Lisbon’s Belem Tower, located near the fish market, in an interesting part of the city. The late Cape Verdean singer Cesaria Evora started her career singing in the taverns of Mindelo, and later brought the uniquely lilting Cape Verdean form of fado music to the world through her bestselling records and concert tours.

18 May 2023

134

At Sea

19 May 2023

135

Las Palmas de Gran Canaria08:00 - 22:00

Perhaps the prettiest of the Canary Islands, Gran Canaria is an almost circular isle with the peak of Pozo de Las Nieves, its highest point, at the centre. With a wealth of natural beauty and all the exciting attractions of city life in the capital, the island offers the best of both worlds. You will no doubt wish to see the sights of the capital’s old quarter, which dates back to the 15th century and encompassses the Vegueta and Triana districts, and wherever you go you can enjoy the glorious subtropical climate, perfect for growing exotic palms and fruits.

20 May 2023

136

Arrecife, Lanzarote08:00 - 23:00

A volcanic island designated a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve, Lanzarote’s dramatic landscapes were shaped by an explosive past. Today, its pretty beaches and virtual absence of rain together with duty-free shopping make the island an extremely desirable destination. The main port and capital, Arrecife, is a pleasant town with a modern seafront and colourful gardens. Outside the capital there is plenty to explore, from the dazzling white salt flats of Janubio and the rugged terrain of Fire Mountain to the eerie caves of Los Verdes and an array of unspoilt fishing villages scattered around the coast. The island is home to a great selection of restaurants and local specialities including garbanzos compuestos – a chickpea stew; papas arrugadas – potatoes with carrots, peas, ham and green pepper; and of course, plenty of fresh seafood. Please note that those planning to participate in one of the shore excursions from this port may need to take an early lunch on board ship to suit the excursion schedules.

21 May 2023

137

Arrecife De Lanzarote

Lanzarote is the northernmost of the Canary Islands, often known as "volcano island." Its capital is Arrecife, a quiet town of about 30,000 inhabitants. Present day Lanzarote consists of two quite distinct massifs: Famara in the north, and Los Ajaches in the south, where centuries of erosion have sculpted abrupt cliffs and deep ravines, contrasting sharply with the smoothly rounded hills of the island's central region.

22 May 2023

138
139

Casablanca07:00 - 23:00

The original settlement formed on the site of Casablanca by the Berbers became the kingdom of Anfa, and during the 15th century harboured pirates who raided the Portuguese coast. In retaliation for the attacks, the Portuguese destroyed Anfa and founded the town they called Casa Branca (white house). They remained here until an earthquake in 1755 and the town was subsequently rebuilt by Mohammed ben Abdallah, whose legacy of mosques and houses can still be seen in the old Medina. Casablanca acquired its present-day name when the Spanish obtained special port privileges in 1781. The French landed here in 1907, later establishing a protectorate and modelling the town on the port of Marseilles. Today Casablanca is Morocco’s largest city, its most significant port and the centre of commerce and industry. The city is a vibrant fusion of European, African and Arabian influences and its French colonial architecture and art deco buildings seamlessly blend in with the busy, colourful markets. Please note that vendors in the souks can be very persistent and eager to make a sale.

23 May 2023 - 24 May 2023

140

At Sea

25 May 2023

141
142

Barcelona

The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches. A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí's majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain's second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona's vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.

26 May 2023 - 27 May 2023

(This holiday is generally suitable for persons with reduced mobility. For customers with reduced mobility or any medical condition that may require special assistance or arrangements to be made, please notify your Cruise Concierge at the time of your enquiry, so that we can provide specific information as to the suitability of the holiday, as well as make suitable arrangements with the Holiday Provider on your behalf).

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