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Royal Lands - Southampton round-trip

23rd May 2023 FOR 10 NIGHTS | Seven Seas Splendor

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This fly cruise holiday is financially protected by REGENT SEVEN SEAS CRUISES under ATOL 10297

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EXCLUSIVE OFFER | EXCLUSIVE $400 FREE to spend on-board per couple | Summer 2023 top choice | Up to 59 FREE shore excursions and FREE car parking in Southampton!

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Please check that you can meet the conditions below in order to travel on this cruise

1) All guests need to be in possession of a valid UK passport. This is also the case on any British Isles cruises. Please click here to check your passport will still be valid on your dates of travel.

2) Please check your travel insurance meets any criteria as specified by your cruise line. You can check your cruise line requirements here. For a travel insurance quote click here. Proof of travel insurance may be required on boarding.

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WHY WE RECOMMEND Iberian Peninsula CRUISES

See Iberian Peninsula Cruises

The Iberian Peninsula – commonly referred to as Iberia – is located in south-western Europe and is the third largest of the European peninsulas, encompassing Spain, Portugal and Andorra alongside the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar and parts of southern France. The region is well-known for its warm Mediterranean climate and boasts a number of famous coastal cities including Barcelona, Porto, Lisbon, Seville and Valencia, all of which are regularly featured on voyages to the region.

Large parts of the Iberian Peninsula are situated within Europe’s Mediterranean region, and as such, Iberian destinations are often included within Mediterranean itineraries.

Iberia has a long and fascinating history, which can be observed at a multitude of historical sites across the region. Visitors can also delve into the local culture of each new port and sample some sumptuous Spanish cuisine or purchase traditional gifts and souvenirs from an abundance of shops and markets found in the vast majority of the peninsula’s ports.

A number of different cruises travel to the Iberian Peninsula throughout the year, usually as part of a Mediterranean voyage, and guests are rewarded with a beautiful climate, stunning scenery and intriguing culture across the region.

There are many luxury Iberian Peninsula cruises available to book right now at SixStarCruises.co.uk with the world's most popular luxury cruise lines, so take a look at what's on offer now and secure your place on-board for the holiday of a lifetime.

With a huge variety of Iberian voyages available year round, we specialise in providing luxury experiences and some of the best cruises to the Iberian Peninsula. Simply call our award-winning Cruise Concierge team to find out how we can tailor your perfect luxury cruise.

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itinerary

1

Southampton06:00 - 18:00

Lying near the head of Southampton Water, a peninsula between the estuaries of the Rivers Test and Itchen, Southampton is Britain’s largest cruise port. It has been one of England’s major ports since the Middle Ages, when it exported wool and hides from the hinterland and imported wine from Bordeaux. The city suffered heavy damage during World War Two and as a result the centre has been extensively rebuilt, but there are still some interesting medieval buildings including the Bargate, one of the finest city gatehouses in England.

23 May 2023

2

Saint-Malo08:30 - 19:45

Thrust out into the sea and bound to the mainland only by tenuous man-made causeways, romantic St-Malo has built a reputation as a breeding ground for phenomenal sailors. Many were fishermen, but others—most notably Jacques Cartier, who claimed Canada for Francis I in 1534—were New World explorers. Still others were corsairs, "sea dogs" paid by the French crown to harass the Limeys across the Channel: legendary ones like Robert Surcouf and Duguay-Trouin helped make St-Malo rich through their pillaging, in the process earning it the nickname "the pirates' city." The St-Malo you see today isn’t quite the one they called home because a weeklong fire in 1944, kindled by retreating Nazis, wiped out nearly all of the old buildings. Restoration work was more painstaking than brilliant, but the narrow streets and granite houses of the Vieille Ville were satisfactorily recreated, enabling St-Malo to regain its role as a busy fishing port, seaside resort, and tourist destination. The ramparts that help define this city figuratively and literally are authentic, and the flames also spared houses along Rue de Pelicot in the Vieille Ville. Battalions of tourists invade this quaint part of town in summer, so arrive off-season if you want to avoid crowds.

24 May 2023

3

Brest09:00 - 19:00

Explore the heart of this naval port, nestled in one of France’s most beautiful natural harbors. Named after the Iroise Sea, you can’t help but stand in awe for the Pont de l'Iroise bridge, which crosses the River Elorn. For another awe-inspiring experience visit Océanopolis, the only ocean discovery centre of its kind in Europe, with its enormous aquariums and a seal clinic. Visitors are welcomed to interact with some of the marine animals.

25 May 2023

4

Lorient07:00 - 17:00

Lorient is commonly referred to as La ville aux cinq ports ("the city of five ports"): military, fishing, commercial, passengers and yachting.

26 May 2023

5

Le Verdon-sur-Mer06:00 - 09:00

Situated on the Garonne River, 70 miles (113 km) inland from the Atlantic, Bordeaux's origin can be traced back to the 3rd century when it was Aquitaine's Roman capital called Burdigala. From 1154 to 1453, the town prospered under the rule of the English, whose fondness for the region's red wines gave impetus to the local wine industry. At various times, Bordeaux even served as the nation's capital: in 1870, at the beginning of World War I, and for two weeks in 1940 before the Vichy government was proclaimed. Bordeaux's neo-classical architecture, wide avenues and well-tended public squares and parks lend the city a certain grandeur. Excellent museums, an imposing cathedral and a much-praised theatre add to the city's attractions. The principal highlights, clustered around the town centre, can easily be explored on foot.

27 May 2023

6
7

Bordeauxundefined - 13:00

Bordeaux as a whole, rather than any particular points within it, is what you'll want to visit in order to understand why Victor Hugo described it as Versailles plus Antwerp, and why the painter Francisco de Goya, when exiled from his native Spain, chose it as his last home (he died here in 1828). The capital of southwest France and the region's largest city, Bordeaux remains synonymous with the wine trade: wine shippers have long maintained their headquarters along the banks of the Garonne, while buyers from around the world arrive for the huge biennial Vinexpo show (held in odd-number years).Bordeaux is, admittedly, a less exuberant city than many others in France, but lively and stylish elements are making a dent in its conservative veneer. The cleaned-up riverfront is said by some, after a bottle or two, to exude an elegance reminiscent of St. Petersburg, and that aura of 18th-century élan also permeates the historic downtown sector—“le vieux Bordeaux"—where fine shops invite exploration. To the south of the city center are old docklands undergoing renewal—one train station has now been transformed into a big multiplex movie theater—but the area is still a bit shady. To get a feel for the historic port of Bordeaux, take the 90-minute boat trip that leaves Quai Louis-XVIII every weekday afternoon, or the regular passenger ferry that plies the Garonne between Quai Richelieu and the Pont d'Aquitaine in summer. A nice time to stroll around the city center is the first Sunday of the month, when it's pedestrian-only and vehicles are banned.

27 May 2023 - 28 May 2023

8

Saint-Jean-de-Luz08:00 - 23:00

Bilbao straddles the Bilbao or Nervión River some 15 miles from the Cantabrian Seacoast. An industrial city, the metropolitan area ranks among Spain's most important commercial and financial centers. Proximity to the sea and early discovery of vast mineral deposits led to the development of the port. The modern city center is El Ensanche (literally "the expansion"). Possibly the newest source of great local pride is the remarkable Guggenheim Museum-Bilbao.

29 May 2023

9

Bilbao07:00 - 23:00

Time in Bilbao (Bilbo, in Euskera) may be recorded as BG or AG (Before Guggenheim or After Guggenheim). Never has a single monument of art and architecture so radically changed a city. Frank Gehry's stunning museum, Norman Foster's sleek subway system, the Santiago Calatrava glass footbridge and airport, the leafy César Pelli Abandoibarra park and commercial complex next to the Guggenheim, and the Philippe Starck AlhóndigaBilbao cultural center have contributed to an unprecedented cultural revolution in what was once the industry capital of the Basque Country.Greater Bilbao contains almost 1 million inhabitants, nearly half the total population of the Basque Country. Founded in 1300 by Vizcayan noble Diego López de Haro, Bilbao became an industrial center in the mid-19th century, largely because of the abundance of minerals in the surrounding hills. An affluent industrial class grew up here, as did the working class in suburbs that line the Margen Izquierda (Left Bank) of the Nervión estuary.Bilbao's new attractions get more press, but the city's old treasures still quietly line the banks of the rust-color Nervión River. The Casco Viejo (Old Quarter)—also known as Siete Calles (Seven Streets)—is a charming jumble of shops, bars, and restaurants on the river's Right Bank, near the Puente del Arenal bridge. This elegant proto-Bilbao nucleus was carefully restored after devastating floods in 1983. Throughout the Casco Viejo are ancient mansions emblazoned with family coats of arms, wooden doors, and fine ironwork balconies. The most interesting square is the 64-arch Plaza Nueva, where an outdoor market is pitched every Sunday morning.Walking the banks of the Nervión is a satisfying jaunt. After all, this was how—while out on a morning jog—Guggenheim director Thomas Krens first discovered the perfect spot for his project, nearly opposite the right bank's Deusto University. From the Palacio de Euskalduna upstream to the colossal Mercado de la Ribera, parks and green zones line the river. César Pelli's Abandoibarra project fills in the half mile between the Guggenheim and the Euskalduna bridge with a series of parks, the Deusto University library, the Meliá Bilbao Hotel, and a major shopping center.On the left bank, the wide, late-19th-century boulevards of the Ensanche neighborhood, such as Gran Vía (the main shopping artery) and Alameda de Mazarredo, are the city's more formal face. Bilbao's cultural institutions include, along with the Guggenheim, a major museum of fine arts (the Museo de Bellas Artes) and an opera society (Asociación Bilbaína de Amigos de la Ópera, or ABAO) with 7,000 members from Spain and southern France. In addition, epicureans have long ranked Bilbao's culinary offerings among the best in Spain. Don't miss a chance to ride the trolley line, the Euskotram, for a trip along the river from Atxuri Station to Basurto's San Mamés soccer stadium, reverently dubbed "la Catedral del Fútbol" (the Cathedral of Football).

30 May 2023

10

Gijón08:00 - 18:00

The Campo Valdés baths, dating back to the 1st century AD, and other reminders of Gijón's time as an ancient Roman port remain visible downtown. Gijón was almost destroyed in a 14th-century struggle over the Castilian throne, but by the 19th century it was a thriving port and industrial city. The modern-day city is part fishing port, part summer resort, and part university town, packed with cafés, restaurants, and sidrerías.

31 May 2023

11

London (Southampton)

Southampton is the largest city and port on the south coast of England. Tour the historic byways of Old Town with its Medieval walls and Tudor architecture. Spend an hour or two meandering along the pathways of Royal Victoria Country Park, picturesquely set along the waterfront on the grounds of a former military hospital where Florence Nightingale once worked. Southampton's maritime past can be explored by strolling along the Town Quay with its marina and lively bars and restaurants. It was here that the Titanic departed on its fateful journey and where the Mayflower sailed for the New World.

01 Jun 2023

(This holiday is generally suitable for persons with reduced mobility. For customers with reduced mobility or any medical condition that may require special assistance or arrangements to be made, please notify your Cruise Concierge at the time of your enquiry, so that we can provide specific information as to the suitability of the holiday, as well as make suitable arrangements with the Holiday Provider on your behalf).

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