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England, New & Old - New York to Southampton

23rd June 2023 FOR 30 NIGHTS | Seven Seas Navigator

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1) All guests need to be in possession of a valid UK passport. This is also the case on any British Isles cruises. Please click here to check your passport will still be valid on your dates of travel.

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WHY WE RECOMMEND North America CRUISES

There are simply so many incredible destinations and unforgettable urban thrills to be found across North America, all of which are perfectly balanced by the amazing array of astounding scenery and incredible natural beauty on offer as you travel through Canada, the USA, and Mexico.

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From Niagara Falls in upstate New York to the volcanic plains & that stretch across the lush archipelago of Hawaii, there seems to be an incredible sight waiting in every port on North American cruises & along with a huge collection of cities and townships, all with their own distinct character and attractions.

On the USA's historic east coast you will have the chance to discover the fascinating heritage and culture of cities like Boston and iconic New York City, visiting some of their most famous landmarks in the process, including the Statue of Liberty, Empire State Building, Central Park, Time Square and much more.

On the west coast, you will be equally as amazed by the experiences on offer, from exciting days spent exploring sun-soaked cities like San Francisco and Los Angeles to time ashore in incredible destinations including Seattle, Las Vegas and beyond, each renowned for their astonishing landmarks and bustling city ambience.

Further north, Canada and Alaska offer amazing opportunities to discover some of North America's most inspiring scenery and amazing wildlife. You could cruise the coast of Alaska and observe this marvellous state's diverse nature and vast areas of wilderness, or visit some of Canada's most iconic cities on an unforgettable journey, including Vancouver, Montreal and Quebec City.

Among the best cruises in North America are summer tours of Canada and Alaska, along with sailings to New York, Seattle and Hawaii and, of course, the Caribbean. Speak with our dedicated Cruise Concierge team and we can match you to your perfect North American cruise – whether you are looking for a wildlife tour in Alaska, or the sun, sand and style of the California coast.

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itinerary

1

New York, New York07:00 - 18:00

From Wall Street's skyscrapers to the neon of Times Square to Central Park's leafy paths, New York City pulses with an irrepressible energy. History meets hipness in this global center of entertainment, fashion, media, and finance. World-class museums like MoMA and unforgettable icons like the Statue of Liberty beckon, but discovering the subtler strains of New York's vast ambition is equally rewarding: ethnic enclaves and shops, historic streets of dignified brownstones, and trendy bars and eateries all add to the urban buzz.

23 Jun 2023

2

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts08:00 - 17:00

Martha's Vineyard, a Massachusetts island, sits in the Atlantic just south of Cape Cod. A longtime New England summer colony, Locals refer to being on The Vineyard as “on island.” It's accessible only by boat or air. Known for its miles of beautiful beaches, Martha’s Vineyard invites relaxation. To the north, Oak Bluffs displays the island’s remarkable charm in its gingerbread cottages and the Flying Horses Carousel, a National Historic Landmark. Bring your camera to snap photos of the pristine sandy beaches, the sailboats and the lighthouses.

24 Jun 2023

3
4

Boston, Massachusettsundefined - 18:00

Home to more colleges and universities than any other city in the United States, Boston has been the intellectual capital of America for more than 350 years. Step into the past along Boston’s Freedom Trail, leading you through some of the most interesting chapters in U.S. history: the site of the Boston Massacre, the Old South Meeting House, Faneuil Hall, and Beacon Hill. You will discover 16 of America’s major colonial and revolutionary sites in all, and all within a 1.5-mile walk.

24 Jun 2023 - 25 Jun 2023

5

Bar Harbor, Maine08:00 - 18:00

A resort town since the 19th century, Bar Harbor is the artistic, culinary, and social center of Mount Desert Island. It also serves visitors to Acadia National Park with inns, motels, and restaurants. Around the turn of the last century the island was known as the summer haven of the very rich because of its cool breezes. The wealthy built lavish mansions throughout the island, many of which were destroyed in a huge fire that devastated the island in 1947, but many of those that survived have been converted into businesses. Shops are clustered along Main, Mount Desert, and Cottage streets. Take a stroll down West Street, a National Historic District, where you can see some fine old houses.The island and the surrounding Gulf of Maine are home to a great variety of wildlife: whales, seals, eagles, falcons, ospreys, and puffins (though not right offshore here), and forest dwellers such as deer, foxes, coyotes, and beavers.

26 Jun 2023

6

Saint-John, New Brunswick07:00 - 15:00

Like any seaport worth its salt, Saint John is a welcoming place but, more than that, it is fast transforming into a sophisticated urban destination worthy of the increasing number of cruise ships that dock at its revitalized waterfront. Such is the demand that a second cruise terminal opened in 2012, just two years after the first one, and 2013 will see the two-millionth cruise passenger disembark. All the comings and goings over the centuries have exposed Saint Johners to a wide variety of cultures and ideas, creating a characterful Maritime city with a vibrant artistic community. Visitors will discover rich and diverse cultural products in its urban core, including a plethora of art galleries and antiques shops in uptown.Industry and salt air have combined to give parts of Saint John a weather-beaten quality, but you'll also find lovingly restored 19th-century wooden and redbrick homes as well as modern office buildings, hotels, and shops.The natives welcomed the French explorers Samuel de Champlain and Sieur de Monts when they landed here on St. John the Baptist Day in 1604. Then, nearly two centuries later, in May 1783, 3,000 British Loyalists fleeing the aftermath of the American Revolutionary War poured off a fleet of ships to make a home amid the rocks and forests. Two years later the city of Saint John became the first in Canada to be incorporated.Although most of the Loyalists were English, there were some Irish among them. After the Napoleonic Wars in 1815, thousands more Irish workers found their way to Saint John. It was the Irish potato famine of 1845 to 1852, though, that spawned the largest influx of Irish immigrants, and today a 20-foot Celtic cross on Partridge Island at the entrance to St. John Harbour stands as a reminder of the hardships and suffering they endured. Their descendants make Saint John Canada's most Irish city, a fact that's celebrated in grand style each March with a weeklong St. Patrick's celebration.The St. John River, its Reversing Rapids, and Saint John Harbour divide the city into eastern and western districts. The historic downtown area (locally known as "uptown") is on the east side, where an ambitious urban-renewal program started in the early 1980s has transformed the downtown waterfront. Older properties have been converted into trendy restaurants and shops, while glittering new apartment and condo buildings will take full advantage of the spectacular view across the bay. Harbour Passage, a redbrick walking and cycling path with benches and lots of interpretive information, begins downtown at Market Square and winds along the waterfront all the way to the Reversing Rapids. A shuttle boat between Market Square and the falls means you have to walk only one way. On the lower west side, painted-wood homes with flat roofs—characteristic of Atlantic Canadian seaports—slope to the harbor. Industrial activity is prominent on the west side, which has stately older homes on huge lots.Regardless of the weather, Saint John is a delightful city to explore, as so many of its key downtown attractions are linked by enclosed overhead pedways known as the "Inside Connection."

27 Jun 2023

7

Halifax, Nova Scotia10:00 - 18:00

Surrounded by natural treasures and glorious seascapes, Halifax is an attractive and vibrant hub with noteworthy historic and modern architecture, great dining and shopping, and a lively nightlife and festival scene. The old city manages to feel both hip and historic. Previous generations had the foresight to preserve the cultural and architectural integrity of the city, yet students from five local universities keep it lively and current. It's a perfect starting point to any tour of the Atlantic provinces, but even if you don't venture beyond its boundaries, you will get a real taste of the region.It was Halifax’s natural harbor—the second largest in the world after Sydney, Australia’s—that first drew the British here in 1749, and today most major sites are conveniently located either along it or on the Citadel-crowned hill overlooking it. That’s good news for visitors because this city actually covers quite a bit of ground.Since amalgamating with Dartmouth (directly across the harbor) and several suburbs in 1996, Halifax has been absorbed into the Halifax Regional Municipality, and the HRM, as it is known, has around 415,000 residents. That may not sound like a lot by U.S. standards, but it makes Nova Scotia’s capital the most significant Canadian urban center east of Montréal.There's easy access to the water, and despite being the focal point of a busy commercial port, Halifax Harbour doubles as a playground, with one of the world's longest downtown boardwalks. It's a place where container ships, commuter ferries, cruise ships, and tour boats compete for space, and where workaday tugs and fishing vessels tie up beside glitzy yachts. Like Halifax as a whole, the harbor represents a blend of the traditional and the contemporary.

28 Jun 2023

8

Sydney, Nova Scotia10:00 - 18:00

If you come directly to Cape Breton via plane, ferry, or cruise ship, Sydney is where you’ll land. If you’re seeking anything resembling an urban experience, it’s also where you’ll want to stay: after all, this is the island’s sole city. Admittedly, it is not the booming center it was a century ago when the continent’s largest steel plant was located here (that era is evoked in Fall on Your Knees, an Oprah Book Club pick penned by Cape Bretoner Anne-Marie MacDonald). However, Sydney has a revitalized waterfront and smattering of Loyalist-era buildings that appeal to visitors. Moreover, it offers convenient access to popular attractions in the region—like the Miner’s Museum in nearby Glace Bay (named for the glace, or ice, that filled its harbor in winter), the Fortress at Louisbourg, and beautiful Bras d'Or Lake.

29 Jun 2023

9

Corner Brook, Newfoundland and Labrador09:00 - 17:00

Newfoundland's fourth-largest city, Corner Brook is the hub of the island's west coast. Hills fringe three sides of the city, which has dramatic views of the harbor and the Bay of Islands. The town is also home to a large paper mill and a branch of Memorial University. Captain James Cook, the British explorer, charted the coast in the 1760s, and a memorial to him overlooks the bay.The town enjoys more clearly defined seasons than most of the rest of the island, and in summer it has many pretty gardens. The nearby Humber River is the best-known salmon river in the province, and there are many kilometers of well-maintained walking trails in the community.

30 Jun 2023

10

Saint Pierre12:00 - 20:00

By heading almost due east from Cap-aux-Meules in Canada, it is possible to reach France in about one day’s worth of steaming! With barely 6,000 inhabitants living on tiny St. Pierre, it is the smallest French Overseas Collective. The residents of St. Pierre are predominantly descendants of Normans, Basque and Bretons and the French spoken is closer to Metropolitan French than to Canadian French. Although Basque is not spoken any longer, the influence is still felt through sport and a Basque Festival. Interestingly, this small island has two museums in part dedicated to the Prohibition. The Musée Heritage is St. Pierre’s newest museum with a focus on medical artefacts from the 19th and 20th century. Another claim to fame is a guillotine, the only one ever used in North America. In this quirky village it is easy to find the Post Office; just look for the clock tower shaped like a praying monk.

01 Jul 2023

11

Saint-John's, Newfoundland and Labrador09:00 - 18:00

Old meets new in the province's capital (metro-area population a little more than 200,000), with modern office buildings surrounded by heritage shops and colorful row houses. St. John's mixes English and Irish influences, Victorian architecture and modern convenience, and traditional music and rock and roll into a heady brew. The arts scene is lively, but overall the city moves at a relaxed pace.For centuries, Newfoundland was the largest supplier of salt cod in the world, and St. John's Harbour was the center of the trade. As early as 1627, the merchants of Water Street—then known as the Lower Path—were doing a thriving business buying fish, selling goods, and supplying alcohol to soldiers and sailors.

02 Jul 2023

12

Cruise Labrador Sea

03 Jul 2023

13

Nuuk

The largest city in Greenland, Nuuk is the cultural and economic center of the country. Explore the picturesque colonial harbor with its quaint old buildings and the newly renovated market where locals sell their daily catch. Greenland’s history comes alive in the National Museum, and its culture thrives in the Nuuk Museum of Art and the Katuaq Cultural Centre. Nuuk’s extensive fjord system is home to many whales, and the area is also populated by seals, reindeer, arctic foxes, arctic hares and ravens.

04 Jul 2023

14

Nuuk (Godthaab)09:00 - 18:00

Nuuk, meaning “the cape”, was Greenland’s first town (1728). Started as a fort and later mission and trading post some 240 kilometers south of the Arctic Circle, it is the current capital. Almost 30% of Greenland’s population lives in the town. Not only does Nuuk have great natural beauty in its vicinity, but there are Inuit ruins, Hans Egede’s home, the parliament, and the Church of our Saviour as well. The Greenlandic National Museum has an outstanding collection of Greenlandic traditional dresses, as well as the famous Qilakitsoq mummies. The Katuaq Cultural Center’s building was inspired by the undulating Northern Lights and can house 10% of Nuuk’s inhabitants.

05 Jul 2023

15

Paamiut (Fredrikshaab)08:00 - 17:00

06 Jul 2023

16

Cruising The Denmark Strait

07 Jul 2023

17

Isafjordur

Discover the dazzling natural beauty of Isafjordur. With its striking steep mountains on three sides rising dramatically around a gorgeous bay, this is one of the most awe-inspiring places on Earth. Trace the area’s history with a visit to the Maritime Museum in one of the oldest buildings dating back to the 18th century. A delightfully urban atmosphere prevails with major music schools, free concerts and festivals. Bring home fine handmade woolen items, nautical-themed articles, as well as arts and crafts. Feast on fresh baked goods and coffee at one of the many cafés.

08 Jul 2023

18

Isafjørdur09:00 - 18:00

Two colossal terraces of sheer rock stand either side of this extraordinarily located town - which rides a jutting spit onto an immensity of black fjord water. Surprisingly, considering the remoteness of its location and its compact size, Isafjordur is a modern and lively place to visit, offering a great choice of cafes and delicious restaurants – which are well stocked to impress visitors. The town is a perfectly located base for adventures amongst Iceland's fantastic wilderness - with skiing, hiking and water-sports popular pursuits among visitors.

09 Jul 2023

19
20

Reykjavíkundefined - 21:00

Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.

10 Jul 2023 - 11 Jul 2023

21

Torshaven

Surrounded to the north and southwest by towering mountains with dramatic landscapes, Tórshavn is a picturesque port steeped in Viking history. Main attractions include Tinganes, the oldest part of town, with small wooden houses covered in turf roofs. Explore Nordic House, widely regarded as one of the finest examples of modern Nordic architecture; and Listasavn Føroya art museum. To fully experience the Faroe Islands’ ancient history, visit the ruins of Magnus Cathedral.

12 Jul 2023

22
23

Tórshavnundefined - 14:00

Surrounded to the north and southwest by towering mountains with dramatic landscapes, Tórshavn is a picturesque port steeped in Viking history. Main attractions include Tinganes, the oldest part of town, with small wooden houses covered in turf roofs. Explore Nordic House, widely regarded as one of the finest examples of modern Nordic architecture; and Listasavn Føroya art museum. To fully experience the Faroe Islands’ ancient history, visit the ruins of Magnus Cathedral.

13 Jul 2023 - 14 Jul 2023

24

Ullapool07:00 - 16:00

Ullapool is an ideal base for hiking throughout Sutherland and taking wildlife and nature cruises, especially to the Summer Isles. By the shores of salty Loch Broom, the town was founded in 1788 as a fishing station to exploit the local herring stocks. There's still a smattering of fishing vessels, as well as visiting yachts and foreign ships. When their crews fill the pubs, Ullapool has a cosmopolitan feel. The harbor area comes to life when the Lewis ferry arrives and departs.

15 Jul 2023

25

Belfast08:00 - 19:00

Before English and Scottish settlers arrived in the 1600s, Belfast was a tiny village called Béal Feirste ("sandbank ford") belonging to Ulster's ancient O'Neill clan. With the advent of the Plantation period (when settlers arrived in the 1600s), Sir Arthur Chichester, from Devon in southwestern England, received the city from the English Crown, and his son was made Earl of Donegall. Huguenots fleeing persecution from France settled near here, bringing their valuable linen-work skills. In the 18th century, Belfast underwent a phenomenal expansion—its population doubled every 10 years, despite an ever-present sectarian divide. Although the Anglican gentry despised the Presbyterian artisans—who, in turn, distrusted the native Catholics—Belfast's growth continued at a dizzying speed. The city was a great Victorian success story, an industrial boomtown whose prosperity was built on trade, especially linen and shipbuilding. Famously (or infamously), the Titanic was built here, giving Belfast, for a time, the nickname "Titanic Town." Having laid the foundation stone of the city's university in 1845, Queen Victoria returned to Belfast in 1849 (she is recalled in the names of buildings, streets, bars, monuments, and other places around the city), and in the same year, the university opened under the name Queen's College. Nearly 40 years later, in 1888, Victoria granted Belfast its city charter. Today its population is nearly 300,000, tourist numbers have increased, and this dramatically transformed city is enjoying an unparalleled renaissance.This is all a welcome change from the period when news about Belfast meant reports about "the Troubles." Since the 1994 ceasefire, Northern Ireland's capital city has benefited from major hotel investment, gentrified quaysides (or strands), a sophisticated new performing arts center, and major initiatives to boost tourism. Although the 1996 bombing of offices at Canary Wharf in London disrupted the 1994 peace agreement, the ceasefire was officially reestablished on July 20, 1997, and this embattled city began its quest for a newfound identity.Since 2008, the city has restored all its major public buildings such as museums, churches, theaters, City Hall, Ulster Hall—and even the glorious Crown Bar—spending millions of pounds on its built heritage. A gaol that at the height of the Troubles held some of the most notorious murderers involved in paramilitary violence is now a major visitor attraction.Belfast's city center is made up of three roughly contiguous areas that are easy to navigate on foot. From the south end to the north, it's about an hour's leisurely walk.

16 Jul 2023

26

Dun Laoghaire07:00 - 19:00

Discover Douglas, the capital of the Isle of Man, with its horse drawn tram and Victorian Era hotels lining the promenade. Delve into its rich Celtic history and lore. Ride the horse drawn tram to the island’s highest summit where you can see six Kingdoms: Scotland, England, Wales, Ireland, the Isle of Man and Heaven. Explore the beautifully transformed Villa Marina complex, first opened in 1931. Enjoy high end shopping while looking for uniquely Manx souvenirs of beautiful tartans, scarves, smoked kippers and locally made cheeses. Enjoy fish and chips and a famous Manx beer along the waterfront in this land of a bygone era.

17 Jul 2023

27

Douglas08:00 - 18:00

The Isle of Man, situated in the Irish Sea off the west coast of England, is a mountainous, cliff-fringed island and one of Britain’s most beautiful spots. Measuring just 30 miles by 13 miles, the Isle of Man remains semi-autonomous. With its own postage stamps, laws, currency, and the Court of Tynwald (the world’s oldest democratic parliament), the Isle of Man is rich with history and lore.Inhabited from Neolithic times, the island became a refuge for Irish missionaries after the 5th Century. Norsemen took the island during the 9th Century and sold it to Scotland in 1266. However, since the 14th Century, it has been held by England. Manx, the indigenous Celtic language, is still spoken by a small minority. The Isle of Man has no income tax, which has encouraged many Britains to regard the island as a refuge. Otherwise, it is populated by Gaelic farmers, fishermen, and the famous tailless manx cats. The varied landscape features austere moorlands and wooded glens, interspersed by fine castles, narrow-gauge railways, and scores of standing stones with Celtic crosses. The hilly terrain rises to a height of 2,036 feet at Mount Snaefell, which dominates the center of the island.

18 Jul 2023

28

Holyhead07:00 - 22:00

Once a northern defense post against Irish raiders, Holyhead later became best known as a ferry port for Ireland. The dockside bustle is not matched by the town, however, which maintains just a small population. Nonetheless, thousands of years of settlement have given Holyhead rich historical ruins to explore, with more in the surrounding hiking friendly landscape.

19 Jul 2023

29

Liverpool07:00 - 17:00

From world-class attractions and sports to legendary music, Liverpool offers old-world charm with modern sophistication, underpinned by a rich cultural history.

20 Jul 2023

30

Waterford07:00 - 17:00

The largest town in the Southeast and Ireland's oldest city, Waterford was founded by the Vikings in the 9th century and was taken over by Strongbow, the Norman invader, with much bloodshed in 1170. The city resisted Cromwell's 1649 attacks, but fell the following year. It did not prosper again until 1783, when George and William Penrose set out to create "plain and cut flint glass, useful and ornamental," and thereby set in motion a glass-manufacturing industry long without equal. The famed glassworks closed after the 2008 financial crisis, but Waterford Crystal has triumphantly risen again from the flames in a smaller, leaner version, opened in 2010 and now relocated to the Mall.

21 Jul 2023

31

Dartmouth09:00 - 19:00

Southampton is the largest city and port on the south coast of England. Tour the historic byways of Old Town with its Medieval walls and Tudor architecture. Spend an hour or two meandering along the pathways of Royal Victoria Country Park, picturesquely set along the waterfront on the grounds of a former military hospital where Florence Nightingale once worked. Southampton's maritime past can be explored by strolling along the Town Quay with its marina and lively bars and restaurants. It was here that the Titanic departed on its fateful journey and where the Mayflower sailed for the New World.

22 Jul 2023

(This holiday is generally suitable for persons with reduced mobility. For customers with reduced mobility or any medical condition that may require special assistance or arrangements to be made, please notify your Cruise Concierge at the time of your enquiry, so that we can provide specific information as to the suitability of the holiday, as well as make suitable arrangements with the Holiday Provider on your behalf).

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This website will provide you with information on the financial protection that applies in the case of each holiday and travel service offered before you make your booking. At the time of booking, our Cruise Concierge will also confirm the financial protection applicable to your specific holiday. Please ask us for further information should you require it. The flight inclusive holidays on this website are financially protected by the ATOL scheme. But ATOL protection does not apply to all holiday and travel services listed on this website. If you do not receive an ATOL Certificate then the booking will not be ATOL protected. If you do receive an ATOL Certificate but all parts of your trip are not listed on it, those parts will not be ATOL protected. The cruise-only holidays on this website are financially protected by ABTA. Please see our booking terms and conditions for further information or for more information about financial protection and the ATOL Certificate, click here. SixStarCruises acts as a retail agent to you and also as a disclosed agent of the holiday provider (the Organiser of the holiday).