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Norway Intensive

1st August 2023 FOR 16 NIGHTS | Azamara Journey

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This fly cruise holiday is financially protected by AZAMARA CLUB CRUISES under ATOL 10372

Freephone9am - 10pm

0808 202 6105

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Book a Club Balcony Stateroom or above and receive $300 FREE to spend on-board per couple, FREE Premium Drinks Package and FREE Wi-Fi for one device

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Please check that you can meet the conditions below in order to travel on this cruise

1) All guests need to be in possession of a valid UK passport. This is also the case on any British Isles cruises. Please click here to check your passport will still be valid on your dates of travel.

2) Please check your travel insurance meets any criteria as specified by your cruise line. You can check your cruise line requirements here. For a travel insurance quote click here. Proof of travel insurance may be required on boarding.

3) Please check the vaccination and testing requirements from the FCDO, your cruise line and any destination countries here

WHY WE RECOMMEND Scandinavia CRUISES

Scandinavia is located in the northernmost corner of Europe and comprises of the nations of Norway, Sweden and Denmark alongside the Nordic countries of Finland, Iceland and the Faroe Islands, which – although not officially part of Scandinavia – are often associated with the region. Luxury cruises to Scandinavia usually focus on destinations across Northern Europe, sometimes incorporating ports within the Baltic States and the UK into their itineraries.

Scandinavia boasts a truly breathtaking natural landscape, especially around the world-famous fjords of Norway, where sweeping valleys, colossal glaciers and winding waterways create a beautiful and unforgettable scene. Perhaps the region’s most well-known natural phenomenon, however, are the incredible Northern Lights, which never fail to amaze and inspire travellers who arrive in the region at the right time to see them.

Scandinavia’s main and capital port cities include Oslo, Bergen, Copenhagen, Stockholm and Helsinki. These marvellous destinations offer an authentic taste of Scandinavian life, brimming with fantastic attractions, from excellent restaurants serving local cuisine and bustling markets at which to purchase traditional souvenirs, to fascinating museums celebrating the region’s illustrious history and other renowned attractions such as theme parks and botanical gardens. Travellers will always feel welcome in Scandinavia as the local people are well-known for their friendly nature towards visitors.

A cruise in Scandinavia could take you to welcoming capitals, up through secluded fjords, or far to the north towards the Arctic Circle. With so many different ways to see this part of the world we’d highly recommend that you speak with one of our Cruise Concierge team, who can find you the best cruises in Scandinavia to suit you.

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itinerary

1

Leith00:00 - 20:00

If ever there were a town made for walking, it would be Scotland's capital. Renowned as one of Europe?s most attractive cities, Edinburgh's Old Town and New Town are a Marvelous mixture of elegant streets, charming squares and quaint alleyways. Of course, the city?s most distinctive landmark is Edinburgh Castle, set high up on a craggy cliff in the center of the city. A must-see.

01 Aug 2023

2

At Sea

02 Aug 2023

3

Stavanger08:00 - 20:00

Overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, Stavanger flourished in the 19th century as a fishing port. While other towns in Norway have suffered with the decline of this industry, Stavanger has kept its economy booming by diversifying, first into shipbuilding and now into oil. These two contrasting industries have created a city of two halves – a modern area of high-rise buildings and a historic centre with cobbled streets and old wooden houses. The city centre was the birthplace of Alexander Kielland, one of the great 19th-century Norwegian novelists. Stavanger Cathedral, dating from 1125, is an impressive building and the only medieval cathedral in Norway that has not been substantially altered since it was first built. From Stavanger you can explore the attractive blue waters of Lysefjord, surrounded by cliffs and striking rock formations, and also visit Hafrsfjord where the Viking King Harald won an important battle that started the Unification of Norway. Those preferring to explore on their own may wish to visit the interesting Petroleum Museum.

03 Aug 2023

4

Haugesund08:00 - 14:00

The lovely port town of Haugesund is known as the birthplace of Norway, crowned as such by Viking King Harald Fairhair in the 9th century. Today it’s one of Norway’s principal culture centers, hosting the Norwegian International Film Festival as well as a jazz festival every summer. The fascinating Viking past of Haugesund comes alive at the Norwegian History Center where re-creations take place on a 7th century Viking farm. And the descendants of renowned Viking ship builders recently completed an exact sailing replica of a dragon ship. If it’s in town, go aboard. Life on the farm was hard; on the sea, unimaginable - no wonder Vikings were so fierce.

04 Aug 2023

5

Olden08:00 - 20:00

See the aqua blue ice of the Jostedal Glacier cascading down the stunning Oldedalen Valley, as you navigate the spindly fjords of Norway. Feel your breath catching in your throat, as you sail into this world of wonder, and the dramatic fjord scenery and interlocking valleys inspire you. The village of Olden opens up some of Norway's most majestic natural wonders, from the glacier - which is mainland Europe's largest - to the sloshing waterfalls that run off it, and the bowing forests that sway all around it. A visit to picturesque Olden is all thrilling panoramas and hikes through wildflower sprinkled trails. The Briksdalsbreen arm of ice, reaches out from the main glacier, and sits around an hour's stroll from the village of Olden itself - regular busses can also take you there. Snaking through steep-sided valleys, you can enjoy a walk close to the foot of the ice, and feel the spray of the waterfalls that plummet nearby, as you breathe in some of the freshest air you’ve ever tasted. The crisp glacial meltwater is so clean and pure that it’s bottled up to be sold across Norway.

05 Aug 2023

6

Ålesund08:00 - 22:00

The coastal town of Ålesund is the commercial capital of the Møre og Romsdal district. But more important, it is noted for its characteristic Jugendstil (Art Nouveau) buildings, which some claim make Ålesund one of the most beautiful towns in Norway. This Art Nouveau style emerged when the town was completely rebuilt after a devastating fire in 1904 destroyed nearly 800 buildings and left 10,000 residents homeless. It is said that the fire started by a tipped oil lamp. Rebuilding was carried out with the help of many young, foreign architects who added their own flourishes to the architectural blend of German Jugendstil and Viking roots. Today, narrow streets are crammed with buildings topped with turrets, spires and gables that bear decorations of dragonheads and curlicues. As one of the few remaining Art Nouveau towns in the world, in 1998 Ålesund was awarded the coveted Houens National Memorial Prize for the preservation of its unique architecture.

06 Aug 2023

7

At Sea

07 Aug 2023

8

Svolvær07:00 - 17:00

The scenery of the Lofoten archipelago is among the most dramatic in Norway, its spectacular glacial rock formations always visible, looming large behind beaches and green fields. Here, 200 km (124 miles) north of the Arctic Circle, the landscape is wild and life is simple, the coast ringed with fishing hamlets and picturesque cabins on stilts that have attracted artists for centuries. Birdlife is abundant, with large colonies of co-habiting species nesting on towering cliffs. Six miles offshore the continental shelf drops away to depths of 3,000 feet, and massive sperm whales can be spotted feeding in the deep, nutrient-rich waters.

08 Aug 2023

9

Tromsø12:00 - 22:00

With its centre located on the island of Tromsø, the municipality of Tromsø is more than five times the size of Norway’s capital, Oslo, and is the world’s northernmost university city. Lying 200 miles inside the Arctic Circle, it is known as the 'Gateway to the Arctic' because it was used as a starting point for hunters looking for Arctic foxes, polar bears and seals. In the 19th century it was a base for explorers on Arctic expeditions – a history that is remembered in the city’s Polar Museum, which you can visit on an excursion. Also commemorated in the area is the history of Norway’s indigenous people, the Sami. Visitors can learn about the traditions, heritage and modern preservation of the Sami culture at the Tromsø Museum. Nowadays, Tromsø is a charming mix of old and new, with wooden buildings sitting alongside contemporary architecture such as the impressive glacier-like Arctic Cathedral, which features one of the largest stained glass windows in Europe. Looking down on the city is Mount Storsteinen, and a cable car runs to the top, giving wonderful views over the surrounding countryside of forested peaks and reindeer pastures.

09 Aug 2023

10

Honningsvåg13:00 - 20:00

Searching in 1553 for a northeast passage to India, British navigator Richard Chancellor came upon a crag 307 yards above the Barents Sea. He named the jut of rock North Cape, or Nordkapp. Today Europe's northernmost point is a rite-of-passage journey for nearly all Scandinavians and many others. Most cruise passengers visit Nordkapp from Honningsvåg, a fishing village on Magerøya Island. The journey from Honningsvåg to Nordkapp covers about 35 km (22 miles) across a landscape characterized by rocky tundra and grazing reindeer, which are rounded up each spring by Sami herdsmen in boats. The herdsmen herd the reindeer across a mile-wide channel from their winter home on the mainland. Honningvåg's northerly location makes for long, dark winter nights and perpetually sun-filled summer days. The village serves as the gateway to Arctic exploration and the beautiful Nordkapp Plateau, a destination that calls to all visitors of this region. Most of those who journey to Nordkapp (North Cape), the northernmost tip of Europe, are in it for a taste of this unique, otherworldly, rugged yet delicate landscape. You'll see an incredible treeless tundra, with crumbling mountains and sparse dwarf plants. The subarctic environment is very vulnerable, so don't disturb the plants. Walk only on marked trails and don't remove stones, leave car marks, or make campfires. Because the roads are closed in winter, the only access is from the tiny fishing village of Skarsvåg via Sno-Cat, a thump-and-bump ride that's as unforgettable as the desolate view.

10 Aug 2023

11

Alta09:00 - 17:00

People have been attracted to the community of Alta for thousands of years, and prehistoric rock carvings discovered in 1973 can be seen at the Alta Museum. Situated at the head of the Altafjord, it is a lush, green and hospitable shelter in the otherwise cold and windswept Finnmark landscape. Halfway between the grim, barren mountain plateau and the wet, stormy coast, Alta offers tree-clad valleys, pleasant temperatures and no more rain than the Sahara. However at 70 degrees North it is quite a different story in winter, when heavy snowfalls and sub-zero temperatures are the order of the day, and clear dark night skies become the arena for dazzling displays of the elusive Aurora Borealis, also referred to as 'the temperamental lady' by Laplanders. The world’s first Northern Lights Observatory, which played an important role in the development of geophysical and meteorological research during the first half of the 20th century, is located just 12 miles from Alta. Perched atop Haldde Mountain, it towers almost 3,000 feet above Kafjord, where the battleship Tirpitz was based during the Second World War.

11 Aug 2023

12

Harstad10:00 - 20:00

Quaint, primary-colored houses and church steeples peek out from a treed hillside surrounding deep blue Atlantic waters, welcoming you to this beautiful Nordic port. Named after the old farm for which the city was built on, Harstad is more popularly known to locals as “The Pearl of Vågsfjorden.” The land of the midnight sun, Norway experiences a full 24 hours of daylight during the summer months between May and July. The most darkness you might experience is when the sun dips just below the horizon, so take advantage of this phenomena by exploring the edge of the Arctic Circle to the fullest.

12 Aug 2023

13

Bodø08:00 - 17:00

The capital of Nordland is a peaceful city, but beneath the surface lies a fascinating and colourful military past. During the Cold War it was an important NATO base, stationing fighter jets to intercept Soviet naval vessels and aircraft. The situation culminated when Premier Kruschev threatened to destroy Bodø with nuclear weapons after a CIA U-2 spy plane bound for the city was shot down over the Soviet Union. You can learn more about the city's Cold War history at the Norwegian Aviation Museum, which is uniquely designed to resemble a biplane and houses an intact U-2 plane, a Spitfire, a rare Hønningstad C-5 polar seaplane and many other interesting exhibits. As well as its military heritage, Bodø boasts the world's strongest maelstrom at Saltstraumen, which attracts a host of visitors every year.

13 Aug 2023

14

Trondheim13:30 - 22:00

One of Scandinavia's oldest cities, Trondheim was the first capital of Norway, from AD 997 to 1380. Founded in 997 by Viking king Olav Tryggvason, it was first named Nidaros (still the name of the cathedral), a composite word referring to the city's location at the mouth of the Nidelva River. Today, it's Central Norway's largest (and Norway's third largest) city, with a population of 150,000. The wide streets of the historic city center remain lined with brightly painted wood houses and striking warehouses. But it's no historic relic: it's also the home to NTNU (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) and is Norway's technological capital.

14 Aug 2023

15
16

At Sea

15 Aug 2023 - 16 Aug 2023

17

Amsterdam (1 night in port)06:00 - 00:00

Amsterdam combines the unrivaled beauty of the 17th-century Golden Age city center with plenty of museums and art of the highest order, not to mention a remarkably laid-back atmosphere. It all comes together to make this one of the world's most appealing and offbeat metropolises in the world. Built on a latticework of concentric canals like an aquatic rainbow, Amsterdam is known as the City of Canals—but it's no Venice, content to live on moonlight serenades and former glory. Quite the contrary: on nearly every street here you'll find old and new side by side—quiet corners where time seems to be holding its breath next to streets like neon-lit Kalverstraat, and Red Light ladies strutting by the city's oldest church. Indeed, Amsterdam has as many lovely facets as a 40-carat diamond polished by one of the city's gem cutters. It's certainly a metropolis, but a rather small and very accessible one. Locals tend to refer to it as a big village, albeit one that happens to pack the cultural wallop of a major world destination. There are scores of concerts every day, numerous museums, summertime festivals, and, of course, a legendary year-round party scene. It's pretty much impossible to resist Amsterdam's charms. With 7,000 registered monuments, most of which began as the residences and warehouses of humble merchants, set on 160 man-made canals, and traversed by 1,500 or so bridges, Amsterdam has the largest historical inner city in Europe. Its famous circle of waterways, the grachtengordel, was a 17th-century urban expansion plan for the rich and is a lasting testament to the city’s Golden Age. This town is endearing because of its kinder, gentler nature—but a reputation for championing sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll does not alone account for Amsterdam's being one of the most popular destinations in Europe: consider that within a single square mile the city harbors some of the greatest achievements in Western art, from Rembrandt to Van Gogh. Not to mention that this is one of Europe's great walking cities, with so many of its treasures in the untouted details: tiny alleyways barely visible on the map, hidden garden courtyards, shop windows, floating houseboats, hidden hofjes(courtyards with almshouses), sudden vistas of church spires, and gabled roofs that look like so many unframed paintings. And don’t forget that the joy lies in details: elaborate gables and witty gable stones denoting the trade of a previous owner. Keep in mind that those XXX symbols you see all over town are not a mark of the city's triple-X reputation. They're part of Amsterdam's official coat of arms—three St. Andrew's crosses, believed to represent the three dangers that have traditionally plagued the city: flood, fire, and pestilence. The coat's motto ("Valiant, determined, compassionate") was introduced in 1947 by Queen Wilhelmina in remembrance of the 1941 February Strike in Amsterdam—the first time in Europe that non-Jewish people protested against the persecution of Jews by the Nazi regime.

17 Aug 2023

(This holiday is generally suitable for persons with reduced mobility. For customers with reduced mobility or any medical condition that may require special assistance or arrangements to be made, please notify your Cruise Concierge at the time of your enquiry, so that we can provide specific information as to the suitability of the holiday, as well as make suitable arrangements with the Holiday Provider on your behalf).

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This website will provide you with information on the financial protection that applies in the case of each holiday and travel service offered before you make your booking. At the time of booking, our Cruise Concierge will also confirm the financial protection applicable to your specific holiday. Please ask us for further information should you require it. The flight inclusive holidays on this website are financially protected by the ATOL scheme. But ATOL protection does not apply to all holiday and travel services listed on this website. If you do not receive an ATOL Certificate then the booking will not be ATOL protected. If you do receive an ATOL Certificate but all parts of your trip are not listed on it, those parts will not be ATOL protected. The cruise-only holidays on this website are financially protected by ABTA. Please see our booking terms and conditions for further information or for more information about financial protection and the ATOL Certificate, click here. SixStarCruises acts as a retail agent to you and also as a disclosed agent of the holiday provider (the Organiser of the holiday).