Southampton round-trip

11 nights - 11 June 2024
Northern Europe
8890944

Save up to £3000 per couple PLUS 15% deposit*

Save £3000 per couple on Door-to-door fares. Save £1500 per couple on Port-to-port fares. Selected sailings only.

Cruise Only Call £0 PP £0 £0

Prices based on 2 people sharing, departing from London airports (unless otherwise stated).

Prices based on 1 person, departing from London airports (unless otherwise stated).

Prices based on 3 people, departing from London airports (unless otherwise stated).

Prices based on 4 people, departing from London airports (unless otherwise stated).

Cruise Only Call £0 PP £0 £0

Prices based on 2 people sharing, departing from London airports (unless otherwise stated).

Prices based on 1 person, departing from London airports (unless otherwise stated).

Prices based on 3 people, departing from London airports (unless otherwise stated).

Prices based on 4 people, departing from London airports (unless otherwise stated).

Cruise Only Call £0 PP £0 £0

Prices based on 2 people sharing, departing from London airports (unless otherwise stated).

Prices based on 1 person, departing from London airports (unless otherwise stated).

Prices based on 3 people, departing from London airports (unless otherwise stated).

Prices based on 4 people, departing from London airports (unless otherwise stated).

Cruise Only Call £0 PP £0 £0

Prices based on 2 people sharing, departing from London airports (unless otherwise stated).

Prices based on 1 person, departing from London airports (unless otherwise stated).

Prices based on 3 people, departing from London airports (unless otherwise stated).

Prices based on 4 people, departing from London airports (unless otherwise stated).

Image featured for illustrative purposes only

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(Prices correct as of today’s date, are updated daily, are subject to change and represent genuine availability at time of update).

This cruise only holiday is financially protected by ABTA

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Included with Cruise & fly -

Private door-to-door transfers in the UK*
Flights and overseas transfers
One complimentary shore excursion per port, per day

Included with Cruise & Fly -

Private door-to-door transfers in the UK*
Flights and overseas transfers
One complimentary shore excursion per port, per day

Itinerary

1

Southampton

Southampton is a port city on England’s south coast. It’s home to the SeaCity Museum, with an interactive model of the Titanic, which departed from Southampton in 1912. Nearby, Southampton City Art Gallery specialises in modern British art. Solent Sky Museum features vintage aircraft like the iconic Spitfire. Tudor House & Garden displays artifacts covering over 800 years of history, including a penny-farthing bike.

Things To See, Do & Taste In Southampton:

  • See:  Stonehenge – A prehistoric megalithic structure and place of spiritual significance.
  • Do:  Wine tasting / winery tour – The Southeast of England has the greatest concentration of commercial vineyards in Britain.
  • Taste:  Tunworth and Winslade cheeses – Locally produced in Hampshire.

11 June 2024
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Southampton
2

Plymouth

Devon’s largest city is packed with seafaring heritage and quintessential britishness. Tea shops, pubs, a famous gin distillery plus a newly revamp port promenade provide much in the way of gentle entertainment, while those who like to stretch their legs only have to look northwards to the rolling moors. The city is of course most famous for its role in the launching of the Mayflower, as it is from Plymouth that the Pilgrim Fathers left for the New World in 1620 – the original steps may have been lost but a stone plaque allows visitors to stand on the exact spot they left from. The town is peppered with remnants of its historic maritime heritage, across the waters of Plymouth Sound lies fortified Drake’s Island guarding the approaches, while Plymouth Hoe, where Sir Francis Drake was famously playing bowls when he received news of the invading Armada, is just up from the docks. Nearby Royal William Yard, built by John Rennie between 1825-31, boasts the largest collection of Grade 1-listed military buildings in Europe. Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery contains maritime displays including important Napoleonic ship models. The city's strategic position on England’s south coast cost it dearly during WWII. From 1940-44 the Luftwaffe basically razed the original city, and many of the original building were destroyed. What was rebuilt is more gritty than pretty, but those who are willing to look beyond the dour city centre will find a very pleasing place surrounded by beautiful English countryside.

12 June 2024
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3

Fishguard

Perched on a clifftop and stunningly picturesque Fishguard is considered the very heart of North Pembrokeshire. A small market town that almost seems untouched by time you’ll find clusters of quayside cottages family businesses selling local produce and plenty of Gaelic charm! Market day falls on a Saturday and although principally food there are some stalls selling local arts and crafts too. If you are not lucky enough to be visiting on market day the pretty high street has some lovely shops where you can easily while away a couple of hours. Known internationally as the place of the last invasion of Britain when the French landed in 1797 the village heaves with history. Historians will of course already know that the two-day invasion soon failed and the peace treaty was signed in the Royal Oak pub in the market square. The calm waters are perfect for kayaking while walkers will love the national parks that are filled with signposted trails for all levels of ability. Cyclist of all levels will also be pleased Fishguard and its surroundings do have a few hills but also lots of straight roads that offer a gentle visit of the stunning landscape. If all the activity gets too much for you then why not enjoy a delicious local welsh cake in one of the pretty cafes or head to the town hall and have a look at the 100 foot long Last Invasion Tapestry a humorous and entertaining story in a Bayeux tapestry style of the 1797 invasion of mainland Britain.

13 June 2024
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Fishguard
4

Dun Laoghaire

Atmospheric cobbled streets, with buskers scraping fiddles and characterful pubs inviting passersby inside, is Dublin in a snapshot. A city of irrepressible energy and lust for life, Ireland's capital is as welcoming a place as you'll find. Horse-drawn carriages plod along cobbled centuries-old streets, blending with an easy-going, cosmopolitan outlook. Known for its fun-filled gathering of pubs, any excuse works to enjoy a celebratory toast and chat among good company. Home to perhaps the world's most famous beer - slurp perfect pourings of thick, dark Guinness - cranked out for the city's thirsty punters. Learn more of the humble pint's journey at the Guinness Storehouse. Dublin has come along way since the Vikings established a trading port here, back in the 9th Century. In the time since, the city became the British Empire's defacto second city, and the Georgian imprint still adds oodles of historic character. Learn of 1916's Easter Uprising, when the Irish rebelled and established their independence here, as you visit the infamous, haunting Kilmainham Gaol. The uprising's leaders were tried and executed in these dark confines. Dublin's St. Patrick's Cathedral has immense history below its steep spire, which dates back to 1191. There's rich literary heritage to leaf through too, and the city's streets were rendered vividly in James Joyce's classic Ullyses. The Museum of Literature celebrates the full scope of Dublin's lyrical talents. Trinity College also has a prestigious roll-call of alumni - visit to see the Book of Kells, a beautifully illustrated bible of the medieval era.

14 June 2024
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5

Belfast

Before English and Scottish settlers arrived in the 1600s, Belfast was a tiny village called Béal Feirste ("sandbank ford") belonging to Ulster's ancient O'Neill clan. With the advent of the Plantation period (when settlers arrived in the 1600s), Sir Arthur Chichester, from Devon in southwestern England, received the city from the English Crown, and his son was made Earl of Donegall. Huguenots fleeing persecution from France settled near here, bringing their valuable linen-work skills. In the 18th century, Belfast underwent a phenomenal expansion—its population doubled every 10 years, despite an ever-present sectarian divide. Although the Anglican gentry despised the Presbyterian artisans—who, in turn, distrusted the native Catholics—Belfast's growth continued at a dizzying speed. The city was a great Victorian success story, an industrial boomtown whose prosperity was built on trade, especially linen and shipbuilding. Famously (or infamously), the Titanic was built here, giving Belfast, for a time, the nickname "Titanic Town." Having laid the foundation stone of the city's university in 1845, Queen Victoria returned to Belfast in 1849 (she is recalled in the names of buildings, streets, bars, monuments, and other places around the city), and in the same year, the university opened under the name Queen's College. Nearly 40 years later, in 1888, Victoria granted Belfast its city charter. Today its population is nearly 300,000, tourist numbers have increased, and this dramatically transformed city is enjoying an unparalleled renaissance.This is all a welcome change from the period when news about Belfast meant reports about "the Troubles." Since the 1994 ceasefire, Northern Ireland's capital city has benefited from major hotel investment, gentrified quaysides (or strands), a sophisticated new performing arts center, and major initiatives to boost tourism. Although the 1996 bombing of offices at Canary Wharf in London disrupted the 1994 peace agreement, the ceasefire was officially reestablished on July 20, 1997, and this embattled city began its quest for a newfound identity.Since 2008, the city has restored all its major public buildings such as museums, churches, theaters, City Hall, Ulster Hall—and even the glorious Crown Bar—spending millions of pounds on its built heritage. A gaol that at the height of the Troubles held some of the most notorious murderers involved in paramilitary violence is now a major visitor attraction.Belfast's city center is made up of three roughly contiguous areas that are easy to navigate on foot. From the south end to the north, it's about an hour's leisurely walk.

15 June 2024
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Belfast
6

Greenock

A titan of culture and character, with a disarmingly warm welcome, Glasgow is a lively, Scottish city with bucket-loads of personality. Built on a bedrock of hard-work, and deep industrial roots, the city is a fascinating balance of old and new. Architectural treasures like the elegant Glasgow City Chambers of 1888 blend with new, angular shocks like the Riverside Museum and armadillo-shaped Clyde Auditorium - both part of a clutch of exciting new developments along the River Clyde’s banks. Also towering over the river - and perhaps Glasgow’s mightiest symbol - is the Titan - a colossal crane and an almighty reminder of Glasgow’s heritage as a constructor of giant battleships and cruise liners. It is far from a grey industrial city these days, however, and leafy parks, manicured gardens and stacked galleries douse the city with its colour and cultural intrigue. George Square is at the heart of it all, overlooked by Glasgow City Chambers and adorned with memorials, columns and statues honouring influential Scots and Prime Ministers of history. The sounds of shoppers and searing bagpipes rattle along the bustling Buchanan Street, where you can stroll and shop to your heart’s content. Stumble across the West End - Glasgow’s quirkier side - which is brimming with brightly painted cafes and pubs of character and characters, and the perfect spot for a sit-down. Glasgow’s Medieval Cathedral is the city’s oldest building and one of Scotland’s oldest cathedrals, while the university is an immaculate, turreted and vaulted temple of learning. With enormous concert halls, overflowing museums and storied castles, Glasgow is one of the United Kingdom’s most characterful, rewarding cities.

16 June 2024
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7

At Sea

17 June 2024
8

Kirkwall, Orkney Islands

Scattered just off the northern tip of Scotland Kirkwall is the capital of the Orkney Islands - a scenic archipelago of fascinating dual heritage. The Viking influence is deep while a prehistoric past and World War history adds to the endless stories that these dramatic islands have to tell. Sparse and beautiful let the sweeping seascapes of frothing waves and dance of the northern lights enchant you as you explore. Windswept beaches are inhabited by whooping swans while grassy cliffs hide puffins amid their wavy embrace. Sea caves and crumbling castles - and the dramatic meeting of the North Sea and the Atlantic Ocean add to the romantic beauty of these lands which may be physically close to the UK but feel an entire world away. The sandstone St. Magnus Cathedral is the centrepiece of Orkney's main town - a place of winding lanes and atmospheric walks - and Britain's northernmost cathedral is a masterpiece that took 300 years to complete. Started in 1137 the beautiful cathedral is adorned with mesmerising stain-glass windows and has been evocatively named as the Light of the North. Look down over the ruined Bishop’s and Earl’s Palaces nearby from the tip of the cathedral's tower. Or test out the islands' history-rich distilleries which produce smokey single malts - said to be the best in the world. You can also venture out to Europe's best-preserved Stone Age Village at the extraordinary World Heritage Site of Skara Brae which offers an unparalleled vision into prehistoric life.

18 June 2024
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9

Newhaven/Edinburgh

Edinburgh is to London as poetry is to prose, as Charlotte Brontë once wrote. One of the world's stateliest cities and proudest capitals, it's built—like Rome—on seven hills, making it a striking backdrop for the ancient pageant of history. In a skyline of sheer drama, Edinburgh Castle watches over the capital city, frowning down on Princes Street’s glamour and glitz. But despite its rich past, the city’s famous festivals, excellent museums and galleries, as well as the modern Scottish Parliament, are reminders that Edinburgh has its feet firmly in the 21st century.Nearly everywhere in Edinburgh (the burgh is always pronounced burra in Scotland) there are spectacular buildings, whose Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian pillars add touches of neoclassical grandeur to the largely Presbyterian backdrop. Large gardens are a strong feature of central Edinburgh, where the city council is one of the most stridently conservationist in Europe. Arthur's Seat, a mountain of bright green and yellow furze, rears up behind the spires of the Old Town. This child-size mountain jutting 822 feet above its surroundings has steep slopes and little crags, like a miniature Highlands set down in the middle of the busy city. Appropriately, these theatrical elements match Edinburgh's character—after all, the city has been a stage that has seen its fair share of romance, violence, tragedy, and triumph.Modern Edinburgh has become a cultural capital, staging the Edinburgh International Festival and the Fringe Festival in every possible venue each August. The stunning Museum of Scotland complements the city’s wealth of galleries and artsy hangouts. Add Edinburgh’s growing reputation for food and nightlife and you have one of the world’s most beguiling cities.Today the city is the second most important financial center in the United Kingdom, and the fifth most important in Europe. The city regularly is ranked near the top in quality-of-life surveys. Accordingly, New Town apartments on fashionable streets sell for considerable sums. In some senses the city is showy and materialistic, but Edinburgh still supports learned societies, some of which have their roots in the Scottish Enlightenment. The Royal Society of Edinburgh, for example, established in 1783 "for the advancement of learning and useful knowledge," remains an important forum for interdisciplinary activities.Even as Edinburgh moves through the 21st century, its tall guardian castle remains the focal point of the city and its venerable history. Take time to explore the streets—peopled by the spirits of Mary, Queen of Scots; Sir Walter Scott; and Robert Louis Stevenson—and pay your respects to the world's best-loved terrier, Greyfriars Bobby. In the evenings you can enjoy candlelit restaurants or a folk ceilidh (pronounced kay-lee, a traditional Scottish dance with music), though you should remember that you haven't earned your porridge until you've climbed Arthur's Seat. Should you wander around a corner, say, on George Street, you might see not an endless cityscape, but blue sea and a patchwork of fields. This is the county of Fife, beyond the inlet of the North Sea called the Firth of Forth—a reminder, like the mountains to the northwest that can be glimpsed from Edinburgh's highest points, that the rest of Scotland lies within easy reach.

19 June 2024
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10

Newcastle upon Tyne

Newcastle upon Tyne is a university city on the River Tyne in northeast England. With its twin city, Gateshead, it was a major shipbuilding and manufacturing hub during the Industrial Revolution and is now a centre of business, arts and sciences. Spanning the Tyne, modern Gateshead Millennium Bridge, noted for its unique tilting aperture, is a symbol of the 2 cities.

20 June 2024
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Newcastle upon Tyne
11

At Sea

21 June 2024
12

Southampton

Southampton is a port city on England’s south coast. It’s home to the SeaCity Museum, with an interactive model of the Titanic, which departed from Southampton in 1912. Nearby, Southampton City Art Gallery specialises in modern British art. Solent Sky Museum features vintage aircraft like the iconic Spitfire. Tudor House & Garden displays artifacts covering over 800 years of history, including a penny-farthing bike.

Things To See, Do & Taste In Southampton:

  • See:  Stonehenge – A prehistoric megalithic structure and place of spiritual significance.
  • Do:  Wine tasting / winery tour – The Southeast of England has the greatest concentration of commercial vineyards in Britain.
  • Taste:  Tunworth and Winslade cheeses – Locally produced in Hampshire.

22 June 2024
... Read More
Southampton

*This holiday is generally suitable for persons with reduced mobility. For customers with reduced mobility or any medical condition that may require special assistance or arrangements to be made, please notify your Cruise Concierge at the time of your enquiry, so that we can provide specific information as to the suitability of the holiday, as well as make suitable arrangements with the Holiday Provider on your behalf.

Map

What's Included with Silversea

Entertainment throughout the day and evening
Return flights included from a choice of UK airports (fly cruise bookings only)
WiFi included on-board
Gratuities included on-board
24-hour room service
Shuttle service to and from ports and airport where available
Almost 1:1 staff to guest ratio
In-suite bar replenished with your preferences
Complimentary laundry where applicable
Selected wines, beers and spirits on-board
Luxurious, all-suite accommodation
Expedition activities and on-board expert lectures on expedition sailings
Door-to-door transfers from your home (selected sailings only)
Butler service for every suite

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