freephone9am - 10pm

0808 202 6105

Seabourn logo

Best of the Mediterranean

26th June 2023 FOR 30 NIGHTS | Seabourn Sojourn

Freephone9am - 10pm

0808 202 6105
Loading ...

This fly cruise holiday is financially protected by SEABOURN under ATOL 6294

Freephone9am - 10pm

0808 202 6105

Concierge expertise

First-class service

Includes Business Class flights and overseas transfers. Includes a FREE internet package!* Book and pay in full to save an additional 10%

Check you are ready to travel

Please check that you can meet the conditions below in order to travel on this cruise

1) All guests need to be in possession of a valid UK passport. This is also the case on any British Isles cruises. Please click here to check your passport will still be valid on your dates of travel.

2) Please check your travel insurance meets any criteria as specified by your cruise line. You can check your cruise line requirements here. For a travel insurance quote click here. Proof of travel insurance may be required on boarding.

3) Please check the vaccination and testing requirements from the FCDO, your cruise line and any destination countries here

WHY WE RECOMMEND Mediterranean CRUISES

From historic capital cities to charming coastal towns dotted across a sun-soaked shoreline, there is so much choice when it comes to picking your perfect Mediterranean cruise itinerary. Take your pick from a host of voyages taking in the Western Mediterranean across Spain, Portugal and the French Riviera, or the Eastern Mediterranean including Italy, Greece and Croatia.

See all Luxury Mediterranean Cruise Deals


Whichever side of the Mediterranean you decide to explore, from the enchanting east to the legendary west - or even both - you will experience the warm climate, captivating culture and fascinating history for which the region is renowned. A Mediterranean cruise offers the opportunity to explore a different city every day - enjoying famous museums, pavement cafes and stunning scenery as you go. Why not book a Cruise and Stay holiday and extend your stay in a city such as Barcelona?

Mediterranean cruises are most popular during the summer months of June, July and August. The hot weather and warm sea make this the ideal time to visit the coastal town and cities. The spring and autumn are also good times to cruise, particularly if you wish to avoid the hustle and bustle of the summer season.

what's included on-board?

Loading...

itinerary

1

Barcelona00:00 - 17:00

The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches. A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí's majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain's second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona's vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.

26 Jun 2023

2

Ciudadela de Menorca08:00 - 17:00

Menorca’s original capital is on the opposite side of the island from Mahon, which the British chose as a capital in the 18th century. The city, situated at the head of a long channel from the sea, has had its share of disputes over sovereignty. Its character reflects the influence of Moorish, Turkish and Spanish rule. Stroll the narrow cobbled streets and find a café in which to sit and pass the time slowly, Menorcan-style. Or take a sortie to look at prehistoric megalithic tombs or the fishing village of Fornells.

27 Jun 2023

3

Bandol08:00 - 17:00

There is a reason this town is called the ville tranquille in French. Bandol is tucked into a sheltered bay around the corner from busy Marseille, and possesses a quiet charm that is a blessing on the Cote d’Azur. Its beachy side, along the Anse de Renecros, is the ticket for a swim or relaxation. Shoppers can browse the designer shops along the quai de Charles De Gaulle. Take in the morning market in Place de la Liberte. Or, for a special treat, take the seven-minute boat ride to the Ile de Bendor just offshore, a car-free enclave purchased in the 1950s by the Ricard family of pastis fame. Ogle the huge bottle collection at the Exposition des Vins et Spiritueux. Then sample some of the famous red and rose wines of the Bandol appellation, perhaps those grown on nearby Embiez.

28 Jun 2023

4

Saint-Tropez08:00 - 23:00

At first glance, it really doesn't look all that impressive. There's a pretty port with cafés charging €5 for a coffee and a picturesque old town in sugared-almond hues, but there are many prettier in the hills nearby. There are sandy beaches, rare enough on the Riviera, and old-fashioned squares with plane trees and pétanque players, but these are a dime a dozen throughout Provence. So what made St-Tropez an internationally known locale? Two words: Brigitte Bardot. When this pulpeuse (voluptuous) teenager showed up in St-Tropez on the arm of Roger Vadim in 1956 to film And God Created Woman, the heads of the world snapped around. Neither the gentle descriptions of writer Guy de Maupassant (1850–93), nor the watercolor tones of Impressionist Paul Signac (1863–1935), nor the stream of painters who followed (including Matisse and Bonnard) could focus the world's attention on this seaside hamlet as did this one sensual woman in a scarf, Ray-Bans, and capris. Vanity Fair ran a big article, "Saint Tropez Babylon," detailing the over-the-top petrodollar parties, megayachts, and Beyoncé–d paparazzi. But don't be turned off: the next year, Stewart, Tabori & Chang released an elegant coffee-table book, Houses of St-Tropez, packed with photos of supremely tasteful and pretty residences, many occupied by fashion designers, artists, and writers. Once a hangout for Colette, Anaïs Nin, and Françoise Sagan, the town still earns its old moniker, the "Montparnasse of the Mediterranean." Yet you might be surprised to find that this byword for billionaires is so small and insulated. The lack of train service, casinos, and chain hotels keeps it that way. Yet fame, in a sense, came too fast for St-Trop. Unlike the chic resorts farther east, it didn't have the decades-old reputation of the sort that would attract visitors all year around. For a good reason: its location on the south side of the gulf puts it at the mercy of the terrible mistral winter winds. So, in summer the crowds descend and the prices rise into the stratosphere. In July and August, you must be carefree about the sordid matter of cash. After all, at the most Dionysian nightclub in town, a glass of tap water goes for $37 and when the mojo really gets going, billionaires think nothing of "champagne-spraying" the partying crowds—think World Series celebrations but with $1,000 bottles of Roederer Cristal instead of Gatorade. Complaining about summer crowds, overpricing, and lack of customer service has become a tourist sport and yet this is what makes St-Tropez—described by the French daily newspaper Le Figaro as the place you can see "the greatest number of faces per square meter"—as intriguing as it is seductive.

29 Jun 2023

5

At Sea

30 Jun 2023

6

Trapani, Sicily08:00 - 17:00

Trapani, the most important town on Sicily’s west coast, lies below the headland of Mount Erice and offers stunning views of the Egadi Islands on a clear day. Trapani’s Old District occupies a scimitarshaped promontory between the open sea on the north and the salt marshes to the south. The ancient industry of extracting salt from the marshes has recently been revived, and it is documented in the Museo delle Saline. In addition to the salt marshes,Trapani’s other interesting environs include the beautiful little hill town of Erice, the promontory of Capo San Vito stretching north beyond the splendid headland of Monte Cofano, the lovely island of Motya and the town of Marsala. Trips farther afield will take you to the magnificent site of Segesta or the Egadi Islands, reached by boat or hydrofoil from Trapani Port.

01 Jul 2023

7

Valletta08:00 - 23:00

Malta's capital, the minicity of Valletta, has ornate palaces and museums protected by massive fortifications of honey-color limestone. Houses along the narrow streets have overhanging wooden balconies for people-watching from indoors. Generations ago they gave housebound women a window on the world of the street. The main entrance to town is through the City Gate (where all bus routes end), which leads onto Triq Repubblika (Republic Street), the spine of the grid-pattern city and the main shopping street. Triq Mercante (Merchant Street) parallels Repubblika to the east and is also good for strolling. From these two streets, cross streets descend toward the water; some are stepped. Valletta's compactness makes it ideal to explore on foot. City Gate and the upper part of Valletta are experiencing vast redevelopment that includes a new Parliament Building and open-air performance venue. The complex, completed mid-2013, has numerous pedestrian detours in place along with building noise and dust. Before setting out along Republic Street, stop at the tourist information office on Merchant Street for maps and brochures.

02 Jul 2023

8

Mgarr, Gozo08:00 - 17:00

A port not often visited by cruise ships, being more accustomed to welcoming fishing boats and private yachts. Malta’s smaller sister-isle has a lot of charm to offer. Villages such as Mgarr all boast tall, elaborately carved churches, the result of a combination of fine-grained, easily carved stone, time, and stonemasons whose skill is matched only by their religious devotion. The city of Victoria was so named to honor the British queen’s Diamond jubilee.

03 Jul 2023

9

Giardini Naxos08:00 - 17:00

This harbor on the eastern shore of Sicily near Messina gives us close access to the fabulous Greco-Roman ruins of Taormina, as well as the active volcano Mt. Etna. The temples, streets and large amphitheater of Taormina make it one of Italy’s premier ancient sites. Its location overlooking the sea and with the backdrop of snow-capped Etna complete the package and make it among the most famous attractions in the Mediterranean region. Giardini Naxos itself boasts a lovely beach at Lido Europa, and intrepid visitors can climb Mt. Etna to see a volcano close up

04 Jul 2023

10

Amalfi08:00 - 17:00

At first glance, it's hard to imagine that this resort destination was one of the world's great naval powers, and a sturdy rival of Genoa and Pisa for control of the Mediterranean in the 11th and 12th centuries. Once the seat of the Amalfi Maritime Republic, the town is set in a verdant valley of the Lattari Mountains, with cream-colored and pastel-hued buildings tightly packing a gorge on the Bay of Salerno. The harbor, which once launched the greatest fleet in Italy, now bobs with ferries and blue-and-white fishing boats. The main street, lined with shops and pasticcerie, has replaced a raging mountain torrent, and terraced hills flaunt the green and gold of lemon groves. Bearing testimony to its great trade with Tunis, Tripoli, and Algiers, Amalfi remains honeycombed with Arab-Sicilian cloisters and covered passages. In a way Amalfi has become great again, showing off its medieval glory days with sea pageants, convents-turned-hotels, ancient paper mills, covered streets, and its glimmering cathedral.

05 Jul 2023

11

Civitavecchia07:00 - 17:00

Italy's vibrant capital lives in the present, but no other city on earth evokes its past so powerfully. For over 2,500 years, emperors, popes, artists, and common citizens have left their mark here. Archaeological remains from ancient Rome, art-stuffed churches, and the treasures of Vatican City vie for your attention, but Rome is also a wonderful place to practice the Italian-perfected il dolce far niente, the sweet art of idleness. Your most memorable experiences may include sitting at a caffè in the Campo de' Fiori or strolling in a beguiling piazza.

06 Jul 2023

12

Golfo Aranci08:00 - 17:00

The Sardinian coastline is serrated by deep-cut coves of sparkling sea, surrounded by rocky prominences and edged in lovely strands of beach. The Aga Khan fell in love with the place, and dubbed it the Costa Smeralda, creating a magnet for the global glitterati. At Golfo Aranci, shining arcs of silvery sand are linked into a larger curve, encircled by a muscular peninsula that looms protectively between the town and the sea. It looks expensive, and it is.

07 Jul 2023

13

L'Île-Rousse08:00 - 17:00

“Where the mountains meet the sea,” the beautiful island of Corsica, set in the blue waters of the Mediterranean between Italy and France, is steeped in history. Ile Rousse is built on the site of an old roman settlement. She rivals Calvi as a seaside resort, with nice sandy beaches and good accommodation facilities. The port of Ile Rousse was built by Pasquale Paoli –most famous Corsican Patriot-in 1758 to replace Calvi, still in Genoese hands, has taken the place of first port in this region for exporting fresh fruit and olive oil. The harbour is located on an peninsula, red coloured rock, that just comes out of the sea hence the name of Ile Rousse which means “ reddish island”. There is a lighthouse at the outer end of the island with an old ruined tower. Returning to the mainland a street leads from port to town centre along a nice sandy beach, towards the main square Place Paoli. In the middle of the square there is a statue of Pascal Paoli. During Summer season, the square surrounded by palm trees welcomes numerous tourists looking for some shade and refreshing ice cream. The old market situated in the middle of the town, faced to the Paoli square, offers a large choice of fresh fruits and veggies as well as fish from the catch of the day, or a sample of the famous Corsican delicatessen, cheeses, honeys and wines.

08 Jul 2023

14

Portofino08:00 - 23:00

One of the most photographed villages along the coast, with a decidedly romantic and affluent aura, Portofino has long been a popular destination for the rich and famous. Once an ancient Roman colony and taken by the Republic of Genoa in 1229, it’s also been ruled by the French, English, Spanish, and Austrians, as well as by marauding bands of 16th-century pirates. Elite British tourists first flocked to the lush harbor in the mid-1800s. Some of Europe's wealthiest drop anchor in Portofino in summer, but they stay out of sight by day, appearing in the evening after buses and boats have carried off the day-trippers.There's not actually much to do in Portofino other than stroll around the wee harbor, see the castle, walk to Punta del Capo, browse at the pricey boutiques, and sip a coffee while people-watching. However, weaving through picture-perfect cliffside gardens and gazing at yachts framed by the sapphire Ligurian Sea and the cliffs of Santa Margherita can make for quite a relaxing afternoon. There are also several tame, photo-friendly hikes into the hills to nearby villages.Unless you're traveling on a deluxe budget, you may want to stay in Camogli or Santa Margherita Ligure rather than at one of Portofino's few very expensive hotels. Restaurants and cafés are good but also pricey (don't expect to have a beer here for much under €10).

09 Jul 2023

15

Monte-Carlo08:00 - 23:00

On one of the best stretches of the Mediterranean, this classic luxury destination is one of the most sought-after addresses in the world. With all the high-rise towers you have to look hard to find the Belle Époque grace of yesteryear. But if you head to the town's great 1864 landmark Hôtel de Paris—still a veritable crossroads of the buffed and befurred Euro-gentry—or enjoy a grand bouffe at its famous Louis XV restaurant, or attend the opera, or visit the ballrooms of the casino, you may still be able to conjure up Monaco's elegant past. Prince Albert II, a political science graduate from Amherst College, traces his ancestry to Otto Canella, who was born in 1070. The Grimaldi dynasty began with Otto's great-great-great-grandson, Francesco Grimaldi, also known as Frank the Rogue. Expelled from Genoa, Frank and his cronies disguised themselves as monks and in 1297 seized the fortified medieval town known today as Le Rocher (the Rock). Except for a short break under Napoléon, the Grimaldis have been here ever since, which makes them the oldest reigning family in Europe. In the 1850s a Grimaldi named Charles III made a decision that turned the Rock into a giant blue chip. Needing revenue but not wanting to impose additional taxes on his subjects, he contracted with a company to open a gambling facility. The first spin of the roulette wheel was on December 14, 1856. There was no easy way to reach Monaco then—no carriage roads or railroads—so no one came. Between March 15 and March 20, 1857, one person entered the casino—and won two francs. In 1868, however, the railroad reached Monaco, and it was filled with Englishmen who came to escape the London fog. The effects were immediate. Profits were so great that Charles eventually abolished all direct taxes. Almost overnight, a threadbare principality became an elegant watering hole for European society. Dukes (and their mistresses) and duchesses (and their gigolos) danced and dined their way through a world of spinning roulette wheels and bubbling champagne—preening themselves for nights at the opera, where such artists as Vaslav Nijinsky, Sarah Bernhardt, and Enrico Caruso came to perform. Along with the tax system, its sensational position on a broad, steep peninsula that bulges into the Mediterranean—its harbor sparkling with luxury cruisers, its posh mansions angling awnings toward the nearly perpetual sun—continues to draw the rich and famous. One of the latest French celebrities to declare himself "Monégasque," thus giving up his French passport, is superchef Alain Ducasse, who said that he made the choice out of affection for Monaco rather than tax reasons. Pleasure boats vie with luxury cruisers in their brash beauty and Titanic scale, and teams of handsome young men—themselves dyed blond and tanned to match—scour and polish every gleaming surface. As you might expect, all this glitz doesn't come cheap. Eating is expensive, and even the most modest hotels cost more here than in nearby Nice or Menton. As for taxis, they don't even have meters so you are completely at the driver's mercy (with prices skyrocketing during events such as the Grand Prix). For the frugal, Monaco is the ultimate day-trip, although parking is as coveted as a room with a view. At the very least you can afford a coffee at Starbucks. The harbor district, known as La Condamine, connects the new quarter, officially known as Monte Carlo with Monaco-Ville (or Le Rocher), a medieval town on the Rock, topped by the palace, the cathedral, and the Oceanography Museum. Have no fear that you'll need to climb countless steps to get to Monaco-Ville, as there are plenty of elevators and escalators climbing the steep cliffs. But shuttling between the lovely casino grounds of Monte Carlo and Old Monaco, separated by a vast port, is a daunting proposition for ordinary mortals without wings, so hop on the No. 1 bus from Saint Roman, or No. 2 from the Jardin Exotique - Both stop at Place du Casino and come up to Monaco Ville.

10 Jul 2023

16

Cavalaire-sur-Mer08:00 - 17:00

Cavalaire is the southernmost beach resort along the Cote d’Azur, and takes pride in its distinction from nearby St. Tropez. Where the latter is all about glamour and glitz, and notably expensive in season, Cavalaire has a family-friendly atmosphere that mainly exploits its three-mile sandy beach and a wide variety of watersports to be enjoyed in the clear, clean waters. The beach was used by the Allies during the invasion of the Provence coast in 1944, but today it hosts a battalion of tots with sand pails and couples with coolers. Along the coast in both directions are a scattering of the hidden coves with creeks and small sandy beaches that give privacy to those with skills to handle the descents. Others, such as Bonporteau and Le Dattier are more easily accessed. Offshore, the playgrounds of the Iles d’Or beckon, and Porquerolles is a short ferry ride away. In the Massif des Maures behind the town, villages like Collobrieres and La Mole invite a pleasant stroll. The 17-acre Domaine de Rayol contains a variety of the sorts of scenic seaside gardens that are the pride of the Cote d’Azur.

11 Jul 2023

17

Sète08:00 - 23:00

The fishing village of Sète serves as gateway to Montpellier, in the North. Other noteworthy destinations in this area include Carcassone, Aigues Mortes, the Abbaye de Fontfroide, and Pezenas. For a look at the real fisherman's life, however, stay right where you are. Sète is the Mediterranean's biggest fishing port. Canals winding through town make it fun to stroll around, and there are a number of good walking paths leading to the beach (about 30 minutes to the west). Although it's small and unspectacular, Plage de la Corniche has calm, pristine waters that are perfect for swimming. For a panoramic view of the area, climb Mont St-Clair or Les Pierres Blanches and pick a beach to settle down on.

12 Jul 2023

18

At Sea

13 Jul 2023

19

Valencia07:00 - 21:00

Valencia, Spain's third-largest municipality, is a proud city with a thriving nightlife and restaurant scene, quality museums, and spectacular contemporary architecture, juxtaposed with a thoroughly charming historic quarter, making it a popular destination year in year out. During the Civil War, it was the last seat of the Republican Loyalist government (1935–36), holding out against Franco’s National forces until the country fell to 40 years of dictatorship. Today it represents the essence of contemporary Spain—daring design and architecture along with experimental cuisine—but remains deeply conservative and proud of its traditions. Though it faces the Mediterranean, Valencia's history and geography have been defined most significantly by the River Turia and the fertile huerta that surrounds it.The city has been fiercely contested ever since it was founded by the Greeks. El Cid captured Valencia from the Moors in 1094 and won his strangest victory here in 1099: he died in the battle, but his corpse was strapped into his saddle and so frightened the besieging Moors that it caused their complete defeat. In 1102 his widow, Jimena, was forced to return the city to Moorish rule; Jaume I finally drove them out in 1238. Modern Valencia was best known for its frequent disastrous floods until the River Turia was diverted to the south in the late 1950s. Since then the city has been on a steady course of urban beautification. The lovely bridges that once spanned the Turia look equally graceful spanning a wandering municipal park, and the spectacularly futuristic Ciutat de les Arts i les Ciències (City of Arts and Sciences), most of it designed by Valencia-born architect Santiago Calatrava, has at last created an exciting architectural link between this river town and the Mediterranean. If you're in Valencia, an excursion to Albufera Nature Park is a worthwhile day trip.

14 Jul 2023

20

Port de Sóller, Palma08:00 - 17:00

The picturesque town of Sóller sits surrounded by orange groves a couple of miles inland from its port on Mallorca’s northern coast, accessible by a vintage tramway. Because it grew wealthy from oranges and olives, the town is bristling with attractive architecture from medieval through the modernist period. The Church of Sant Bartomeu dates from the 13th Century, but has a Baroque structure added, a Modernist façade from 1904 and a 1912 tower. The Can Prunera modern art museum is housed in an Art Nouveau mansion, and the Natural Sciences Museum in another converted manor house. Many visitors arrive from Palma on the cross-island vintage railway, and sit in the cafés of the Plaça Constitució admiring the buildings and distinctive green Mallorcan shutters on the windows. More ambitious visitors stroll the impressive Botanical Gardens or hike into the surrounding Tramuntana range.

15 Jul 2023

21

Barcelona07:00 - 17:00

The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches. A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí's majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain's second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona's vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.

16 Jul 2023

22

Port-Vendres07:00 - 16:00

The gem of the Vermillion Coast, the chosen retreat of kings past, the inspiration of great 20th-century artists, Collioure is nestled in a small, rocky bay, dwarfed by the Alberes Mountains. The village is perfectly integrated into the countryside; the church and the stone chateau are the color of the rocks, the beach and the mountains. The town has kept much of its medieval character, with the bay separated into halves by the 13th-century royal castle of the Kings of Mallorca. Between the castle and the sea is a bustling old town, full of cafes, shops and art galleries. Among the great artists who have congregated here are Matisse, Picasso, Braque, Dufy and Derain.

17 Jul 2023

23

At Sea

18 Jul 2023

24

Málaga08:00 - 23:00

As you sail into Malaga you will notice what an idyllic setting the city enjoys on the famous Costa del Sol. To the east of this provincial capital, the coast along the region of La Axarqua is scattered with villages, farmland and sleepy fishing hamlets - the epitome of traditional rural Spain. To the west stretches a continuous city where the razzmatazz and bustle creates a colourful contrast that is easily recognisable as the Costa del Sol. Surrounding the region, the Penibéetica Mountains provide an attractive backdrop overlooking the lower terraced slopes which yield olives and almonds. This spectacular mountain chain shelters the province from cold northerly winds, giving it a reputation as a therapeutic and exotic place in which to escape from cold northern climes. Malaga is also the gateway to many of Andalusia's enchanting historic villages, towns and cities.

19 Jul 2023

25

Gibraltar08:00 - 17:00

Tagged on to the end of Iberia, the intriguing British outpost of Gibraltar is dominated by a sandy peninsula and the stunning 1,400-feet-high limestone Rock. Although small, Gibraltar has always been seen as having great strategic importance on account of its advantageous position where the Atlantic meets the Mediterranean, just 12 miles from the coast of Africa. Ever popular with British holidaymakers, Gibraltar is very much a home from home, boasting excellent duty-free shopping in many familiar British high street shops. Please note: Gibraltar’s small size and narrow winding roads mean that excursions are operated by 22-seater mini-buses, accompanied by a driver/guide. Local health and safety regulations prohibit the carriage of walking aids and collapsible wheelchairs on these vehicles. If you do wish to bring a mobility aid, we can arrange the Rock Tour by taxi, which has extra space. If this suits your requirements, please advise the Tours and Travel office when you join the ship, as numbers are limited.

20 Jul 2023

26

Casablanca07:00 - 21:00

The original settlement formed on the site of Casablanca by the Berbers became the kingdom of Anfa, and during the 15th century harboured pirates who raided the Portuguese coast. In retaliation for the attacks, the Portuguese destroyed Anfa and founded the town they called Casa Branca (white house). They remained here until an earthquake in 1755 and the town was subsequently rebuilt by Mohammed ben Abdallah, whose legacy of mosques and houses can still be seen in the old Medina. Casablanca acquired its present-day name when the Spanish obtained special port privileges in 1781. The French landed here in 1907, later establishing a protectorate and modelling the town on the port of Marseilles. Today Casablanca is Morocco’s largest city, its most significant port and the centre of commerce and industry. The city is a vibrant fusion of European, African and Arabian influences and its French colonial architecture and art deco buildings seamlessly blend in with the busy, colourful markets. Please note that vendors in the souks can be very persistent and eager to make a sale.

21 Jul 2023

27

Tangier10:00 - 19:00

Tangier can trace its origins back to the Phoenicians and ancient Greeks. It was named after Tinge, the mother of Hercules’ son, and its beginnings are embedded in mythology. It was subsequently a Roman province, and after Vandal and Byzantine influences, was occupied by the Arabs with Spain, Portugal, France and England also playing a part in the city’s history. With such a diverse past it is perhaps not surprising that Tangier is such an individual city. Overlooking the Straits of Gibraltar, the city lies on a bay between two promontories. With its old Kasbah, panoramic views, elegant buildings, squares and places of interest, there is much to discover in both the new and old parts of the city.

22 Jul 2023

28

Melilla10:00 - 18:00

The autonomous city of Melilla is a Spanish enclave located on the Mediterranean Rif coast of North Africa, bordering Morocco. Its chequered past embraced periods of Phoenician, Punic, Roman and Byzantine rule before it was conquered by Spain in 1497. The latter part of the 19th century and the first quarter of the 20th century saw hostilities between Rif berbers and the Spanish, with the latter finally reinstating their control in 1927. The city was used by General Franco as one of the staging points for the rebellion of 1936. As part of the Spanish protectorate, Melilla developed the architectural style of 'Modernisme', the Catalan version of Art Nouveau, and boasts the second most important concentration of Modernist works in Spain, after Barcelona.

23 Jul 2023

29

Cartagena08:00 - 18:00

A Mediterranean city and naval station located in the Region of Murcia, southeastern Spain, Cartagena’s sheltered bay has attracted sailors for centuries. The Carthaginians founded the city in 223BC and named it Cartago Nova; it later became a prosperous Roman colony, and a Byzantine trading centre. The city has been the main Spanish Mediterranean naval base since the reign of King Philip II, and is still surrounded by walls built during this period. Cartagena’s importance grew with the arrival of the Spanish Bourbons in the 18th century, when the Navidad Fortress was constructed to protect the harbour. In recent years, traces of the city’s fascinating past have been brought to light: a well-preserved Roman Theatre was discovered in 1988, and this has now been restored and opened to the public. During your free time, you may like to take a mini-cruise around Cartagena's historic harbour: these operate several times a day, take approximately 40 minutes and do not need to be booked in advance. Full details will be available at the port.

24 Jul 2023

30

Ibiza08:00 - 18:00

Hedonistic and historic, Eivissa (Ibiza, in Castilian) is a city jam-packed with cafés, nightspots, and trendy shops; looming over it are the massive stone walls of Dalt Vila —the medieval city declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1999—and its Gothic cathedral. Squeezed between the north walls of the old city and the harbor is Sa Penya, a long labyrinth of stone-paved streets that offer some of the city's best offbeat shopping, snacking, and exploring. The tourist information office on Vara de Rey has a useful map of walks through the old city.

25 Jul 2023

31

Barcelona

The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches. A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí's majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain's second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona's vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.

26 Jul 2023

(This holiday is generally suitable for persons with reduced mobility. For customers with reduced mobility or any medical condition that may require special assistance or arrangements to be made, please notify your Cruise Concierge at the time of your enquiry, so that we can provide specific information as to the suitability of the holiday, as well as make suitable arrangements with the Holiday Provider on your behalf).

ACCOMMODATION

Alternative sailing dates

Flexible with departure dates? Alternative sailing dates for this itinerary are available in the list below

undefined logo

25th Aug 2023

- 30 Nights

Seabourn Sojourn

Best of the Mediterranean

ID: 336005

Barcelona, Ciutadella, Spain, Bandol, France, Saint-Tropez, Trapani, Mgarr (Victoria), Malta, Valletta, Giardini Naxos (Taormina), Italy, Amalfi Coast (Salerno), Civitavecchia, Golfo Aranci, Sardinia, Italy, L'Ile-Rousse, Corsica, France, Portofino, Monte Carlo, Cavalaire-sur-Mer, France, Sete, Valencia, Spain, Soller, Mallorca, Spain, Port Vendres, Malaga, Gibraltar, Casablanca, Tangier, Melilla,Spanish Morocco, Spain, Cartagena, Spain, Ibiza, Spain

CALL

undefined logo

15th Aug 2023

- 30 Nights

Seabourn Sojourn

Best of the Mediterranean

ID: 335929

Barcelona, Port Vendres, Malaga, Gibraltar, Casablanca, Tangier, Melilla,Spanish Morocco, Spain, Cartagena, Spain, Ibiza, Spain, Ciutadella, Spain, Bandol, France, Saint-Tropez, Trapani, Mgarr (Victoria), Malta, Valletta, Giardini Naxos (Taormina), Italy, Amalfi Coast (Salerno), Civitavecchia, Golfo Aranci, Sardinia, Italy, L'Ile-Rousse, Corsica, France, Portofino, Monte Carlo, Cavalaire-sur-Mer, France, Sete, Valencia, Spain, Soller, Mallorca, Spain

undefined logo

5th Aug 2023

- 30 Nights

Seabourn Sojourn

Best of the Mediterranean

ID: 335851

Civitavecchia, Golfo Aranci, Sardinia, Italy, L'Ile-Rousse, Corsica, France, Portofino, Monte Carlo, Cavalaire-sur-Mer, France, Sete, Valencia, Spain, Soller, Mallorca, Spain, Barcelona, Port Vendres, Malaga, Gibraltar, Casablanca, Tangier, Melilla,Spanish Morocco, Spain, Cartagena, Spain, Ibiza, Spain, Ciutadella, Spain, Bandol, France, Saint-Tropez, Trapani, Mgarr (Victoria), Malta, Valletta, Giardini Naxos (Taormina), Italy, Amalfi Coast (Salerno)

undefined logo

26th Jul 2023

- 30 Nights

Seabourn Sojourn

Best of the Mediterranean

ID: 335532

Barcelona, Ciutadella, Spain, Bandol, France, Saint-Tropez, Trapani, Mgarr (Victoria), Malta, Valletta, Giardini Naxos (Taormina), Italy, Amalfi Coast (Salerno), Civitavecchia, Golfo Aranci, Sardinia, Italy, L'Ile-Rousse, Corsica, France, Portofino, Monte Carlo, Cavalaire-sur-Mer, France, Sete, Valencia, Spain, Soller, Mallorca, Spain, Port Vendres, Malaga, Gibraltar, Casablanca, Tangier, Melilla,Spanish Morocco, Spain, Cartagena, Spain, Ibiza, Spain

undefined logo

16th Jul 2023

- 30 Nights

Seabourn Sojourn

Best of the Mediterranean

ID: 335405

Barcelona, Port Vendres, Malaga, Gibraltar, Casablanca, Tangier, Melilla,Spanish Morocco, Spain, Cartagena, Spain, Ibiza, Spain, Ciutadella, Spain, Bandol, France, Saint-Tropez, Trapani, Mgarr (Victoria), Malta, Valletta, Giardini Naxos (Taormina), Italy, Amalfi Coast (Salerno), Civitavecchia, Golfo Aranci, Sardinia, Italy, L'Ile-Rousse, Corsica, France, Portofino, Monte Carlo, Cavalaire-sur-Mer, France, Sete, Valencia, Spain, Soller, Mallorca, Spain

undefined logo

6th Jul 2023

- 30 Nights

Seabourn Sojourn

Best of the Mediterranean

ID: 335801

Civitavecchia, Golfo Aranci, Sardinia, Italy, L'Ile-Rousse, Corsica, France, Portofino, Monte Carlo, Cavalaire-sur-Mer, France, Sete, Valencia, Spain, Soller, Mallorca, Spain, Barcelona, Port Vendres, Malaga, Gibraltar, Casablanca, Tangier, Melilla,Spanish Morocco, Spain, Cartagena, Spain, Ibiza, Spain, Ciutadella, Spain, Bandol, France, Saint-Tropez, Trapani, Mgarr (Victoria), Malta, Valletta, Giardini Naxos (Taormina), Italy, Amalfi Coast (Salerno)

SELECTED
undefined logo

26th Jun 2023

- 30 Nights

Seabourn Sojourn

Best of the Mediterranean

ID: 335980

Barcelona, Ciutadella, Spain, Bandol, France, Saint-Tropez, Trapani, Valletta, Mgarr (Victoria), Malta, Giardini Naxos (Taormina), Italy, Amalfi Coast (Salerno), Civitavecchia, Golfo Aranci, Sardinia, Italy, L'Ile-Rousse, Corsica, France, Portofino, Monte Carlo, Cavalaire-sur-Mer, France, Sete, Valencia, Spain, Soller, Mallorca, Spain, Port Vendres, Malaga, Gibraltar, Casablanca, Tangier, Melilla,Spanish Morocco, Spain, Cartagena, Spain, Ibiza, Spain

FROM

£21559

PP

undefined logo

16th Jun 2023

- 30 Nights

Seabourn Sojourn

Best of the Mediterranean

ID: 335708

Barcelona, Port Vendres, Malaga, Gibraltar, Casablanca, Tangier, Melilla,Spanish Morocco, Spain, Cartagena, Spain, Ibiza, Spain, Ciutadella, Spain, Bandol, France, Saint-Tropez, Trapani, Valletta, Mgarr (Victoria), Malta, Giardini Naxos (Taormina), Italy, Amalfi Coast (Salerno), Civitavecchia, Golfo Aranci, Sardinia, Italy, L'Ile-Rousse, Corsica, France, Portofino, Monte Carlo, Cavalaire-sur-Mer, France, Sete, Valencia, Spain, Soller, Mallorca, Spain

most popular sailings

read advice from our cruise experts

Our Award-Winning Service

explore

  • about us
  • contact us
  • news
  • advice
  • privacy policy
  • terms of use
  • how to pay
  • careers

sign up for exclusive offers

© 2022 SixStarCruises

follow us

This website will provide you with information on the financial protection that applies in the case of each holiday and travel service offered before you make your booking. At the time of booking, our Cruise Concierge will also confirm the financial protection applicable to your specific holiday. Please ask us for further information should you require it. The flight inclusive holidays on this website are financially protected by the ATOL scheme. But ATOL protection does not apply to all holiday and travel services listed on this website. If you do not receive an ATOL Certificate then the booking will not be ATOL protected. If you do receive an ATOL Certificate but all parts of your trip are not listed on it, those parts will not be ATOL protected. The cruise-only holidays on this website are financially protected by ABTA. Please see our booking terms and conditions for further information or for more information about financial protection and the ATOL Certificate, click here. SixStarCruises acts as a retail agent to you and also as a disclosed agent of the holiday provider (the Organiser of the holiday).