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Circle South America - Miami round-trip

4th December 2023 FOR 67 NIGHTS | Seven Seas Splendor

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This fly cruise holiday is financially protected by REGENT SEVEN SEAS CRUISES under ATOL 10297

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First-class service

BRAND NEW SAILING! Includes Business Class flights, overseas transfers, one-night pre-cruise hotel stay and up to 194 FREE shore excursions

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Please check that you can meet the conditions below in order to travel on this cruise

1) All guests need to be in possession of a valid UK passport. This is also the case on any British Isles cruises. Please click here to check your passport will still be valid on your dates of travel.

2) Please check your travel insurance meets any criteria as specified by your cruise line. You can check your cruise line requirements here. For a travel insurance quote click here. Proof of travel insurance may be required on boarding.

3) Please check the vaccination and testing requirements from the FCDO, your cruise line and any destination countries here

WHY WE RECOMMEND Caribbean CRUISES

Arguably one of the world’s most popular and iconic cruise destinations, the Caribbean is a holidaymaker’s paradise. This famous archipelago is made up of a number of secluded and picturesque tropical islands, each with its own beautiful and scenic landscape alongside a laid-back local culture, all complemented by a wonderfully warm climate.

See all Caribbean Cruise Deals


The Caribbean’s many idyllic island destinations boast plenty of pristine golden sandy beaches, crystal clear ocean waters and friendly locals, so visitors will always feel welcome wherever in the region they travel. However, the islands are not limited to their natural beauty, as much of the Caribbean also has a rich local culture and an illustrious history, often on display in the form of landmarks and fascinating museums as well as charming dining venues and bustling marketplaces.

Tip: See more during your holiday with a Caribbean Cruise and Stay holiday.

The best cruises to the Caribbean usually operate during the winter months, offering travellers the chance to escape from the cold weather and arrive in a warmer and all-together more exciting part of the world, where the sun is shining and relaxation is always on the agenda.

A Caribbean cruise offers the ultimate escape for sun-lovers and anyone looking for a truly relaxing holiday in a collection of the world's most picture-perfect destinations. There really is no better way to explore this idyllic archipelago than on a cruise getaway, so why not book your luxury Caribbean journey today and start looking forward to the holiday of a lifetime?

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itinerary

1

Miami, Florida06:00 - 19:00

Miami is one of the world’s most popular holiday spots. It has so much to offer; from its countless beach areas, to culture and museums, from spa and shopping days out, to endless cuban restaurants and cafes. Miami is a multicultural city that has something to offer to everyone.

04 Dec 2023

2

Cruise Gulf Of Mexico

05 Dec 2023

3

Costa Maya08:00 - 18:00

Costa Maya is the closest port of access to many of the lesser known Mayan ruins in the Yucatan including Chacchoben and Kohunlich. These sites are substantially less excavated than the better known pyramids near Cancun. The Mexican government is trying to improve the standard of living for the Indian population. The path chosen to do this in the Costa Maya area is to develop small-scale ecological based tourism destinations, including natural reserve parks.

06 Dec 2023

4

Harvest Caye08:00 - 19:00

07 Dec 2023

5

Santo Tomás de Castilla08:00 - 19:00

Guatemala's short Caribbean shoreline doesn't generate the buzz of those of neighboring Belize and Mexico. The coast weighs in at a scant 74 mi (123 km), and this mostly highland country wears its indigenous culture on its sleeve and has historically looked inland rather than to the sea. You'll be drawn inland, too, with a variety of shore excursions. This is the land of the Maya, after all. But there's plenty to keep you occupied here in the lowlands. Tourist brochures tout the Caribbean coast as "The Other Guatemala". The predominantly indigenous and Spanish cultures of the highlands give way to an Afro-Caribbean tradition that listens more closely to the rhythms of far-off Jamaica rather than taking its cue from Guatemala City. Think of it as mixing a little reggae with your salsa.

08 Dec 2023

6

Roatán Island07:00 - 17:00

Experience true Caribbean island bliss, during your time on the immaculate paradise of Roatan, which is the largest of the Bay Islands. This slim island is framed by glorious powdery white beaches, and rich ocean beds carpeted with diverse coral reefs - alive with fish and marine life. Curious dolphins roll through the waves just offshore, while beach dwellers soak up the sun, and enjoy coconut cocktails, beside leaning palm trees. The beaches here are nothing short of dreamy - with wooden piers teetering out over the water, and thatched roofs providing welcome shade, as you dangle your legs towards the water.

09 Dec 2023

7

Cruise Caribbean Sea

10 Dec 2023

8

Puerto Limón08:00 - 17:00

Christopher Columbus became Costa Rica's first tourist when he landed on this stretch of coast in 1502 during his fourth and final voyage to the New World. Expecting to find vast mineral wealth, he named the region Costa Rica ("rich coast"). Imagine the Spaniards' surprise eventually to find there was none. Save for a brief skirmish some six decades ago, the country did prove itself rich in a long tradition of peace and democracy. No other country in Latin America can make that claim. Costa Rica is also abundantly rich in natural beauty, managing to pack beaches, volcanoes, rain forests, and diverse animal life into an area the size of Vermont and New Hampshire combined. It has successfully parlayed those qualities into its role as one the world's great ecotourism destinations. A day visit is short, but time enough for a quick sample.

11 Dec 2023

9

Transit Panama Canal

The Panama Canal is the world's biggest short-cut. You will be amazed by its sheer scale and clockwork efficiency.

12 Dec 2023

10
11

Panama Cityundefined - 18:00

Expect incredible morning views as you arrive into the port for Panama City. Tinged with a silver pre-dawn light, the city will metamorphosise into a golden glow as the sun rises above it. And from then on expect one stunning view after another. Very interesting in its own right, Fuerte Amador is obviously overshadowed by its proximity to Panama City. So should the Miraflores museum of the Canal, which offers a comprehensive and immersive tour of the Canal including a 3-D experience, four exhibition halls, an observation deck, and a surprisingly good restaurant not interest you then there is always the option of lovely Casco Viejo – literally the old quartier of Panama. The grand old colonial houses, cobbled streets, independent boutiques and buzzing street scene make this a must stop on your itinerary. And if you like seafood, you will not want miss the many restaurants and market stalls serving different variations of so-fresh-it’s-still-practically-swimming ceviche. Best eaten like the Panamanians do, with salty crackers and a cold beer on the beach. And if money is no object, a cup of geisha coffee – supposedly the world’s best and definitely the world’s most expensive at $7 a shot is definitely a pick me up! Cool cosmopolitan capital aside, Panama has a skyscraper filled skyline that is worthy of some of its North American counterparts. But if urban utopia is not your scene then fear not, the sandy beaches and lush rainforests are never more than a short cab ride away.

12 Dec 2023 - 13 Dec 2023

12

Manta, Equador

Manta, with a population of approximately 140,000, is Ecuador’s major port along the central coast. Colorful fishing villages, unspoiled beaches and unusual tropical dry forest make Manta an attractive tourist destination and the starting point for exciting day trips. Nearby, Montecristi was founded in the early 1600s with its colonial architecture. This small town is best known for its woven wickerwork, and as the birth place of the “Panama hat” which although historically produced in Ecuador, were first widely distributed from Panama.

14 Dec 2023

13

Manta08:00 - 18:00

Known as the ‘Pacific Pearl’, the history of Guayaquil has always been intimately tied to the Rio Guayas. As the economic powerhouse of Ecuador, Guayaquil is a city in transition, transforming itself into a modern metropolis while managing to retain its cultural heritage. Stroll along the Malecon 2000, one of South America’s largest reconstruction projects, running along the Guayas River and discover green public spaces, blue ponds, shopping, restaurants, river boat excursions and a handicraft market. Guayaquil is the gateway for excursions to the natural wonders of the Galapagos Islands, one of the world’s most important wildlife areas.

15 Dec 2023

14

Guayaquil08:00 - 19:00

The second major jumping off point for the Galapagos Islands after Quito, this is a little city with a big heart. A sea port first and foremost, the city’s personality has been founded on that, and all the better it is for it too. Almost Caribbean in feeling, the clement climate coupled with the intermingling rhythms floating from the windows and abundance of fresh seafood make this a very tropical destination. Once not even considered by the travel books as a potential destination in its own right, the city has undergone something of a resurgence in the past few years. Proud Guayaquileños will not hestitate to point out the Malecón or the exciting new riverfront promenade, once a no-go area after dark, now happily (and hippily) lined with museums, restaurants, shops, and ongoing entertainment. The new airport and urban transportation network are also lauded to the happy tourists who find themselves here. As the largest and most populous city in Ecuador as well as being the commercial centre, it would only be natural that the city would have some kind of modern architecture, but it is the colourful favelas, or to use their real name guasmos, that cling to the side of the hillside like limpets that really catch your eye. A blend of old and new, the first inhabitants can be traced back to 1948 when the government cleared the area for affordable housing, these shanty towns are witness to the social and political particularities that Guayaquil has faced in the past.

16 Dec 2023

15

Salaverry, Peru

This port is located near the city of Trujillo, founded by the conquistador Diego de Almagro in 1534. Trujillo still retains much of its colonial charm, and has a splendid backdrop consisting of the vivid green and brown terrain of the Andean foothills. Trujillo is one of the most important cities in Peru although its compact colonial center has a small-town feel.

17 Dec 2023

16

Salaverry07:00 - 17:00

Located about nine hours north of Lima, Trujillo was founded in 1534 by the Spanish conquistador Pizarro. The attractive, colonial city retains much of its original charm with elegant casonas, or mansions, lining the streets. Nearby is Chan Chan, the ancient capital of the Chimú, a local Indian tribe who came under the rule of the Incas. The area has several other Chimú sites, some dating back about 1500 years. The region is also famous as the home of the Peruvian Paso horses, as well as excellent beaches offering world-class surfing and other water sports.

18 Dec 2023

17
18

Callaoundefined - 20:00

When people discuss great South American cities, Lima is often overlooked. But Peru's capital can hold its own against its neighbors. It has an oceanfront setting, colonial-era splendor, sophisticated dining, and nonstop nightlife.It's true that the city—clogged with traffic and choked with fumes—doesn't make a good first impression, especially since the airport is in an industrial neighborhood. But wander around the regal edifices surrounding the Plaza de Armas, among the gnarled olive trees of San Isidro's Parque El Olivar, or along the winding lanes in the coastal community of Barranco, and you'll find yourself charmed.In 1535 Francisco Pizarro found the perfect place for the capital of Spain's colonial empire. On a natural port, the so-called Ciudad de los Reyes (City of Kings) allowed Spain to ship home all the gold the conquistador plundered from the Inca. Lima served as the capital of Spain's South American empire for 300 years, and it's safe to say that no other colonial city enjoyed such power and prestige during this period.When Peru declared its independence from Spain in 1821, the declaration was read in the square that Pizarro had so carefully designed. Many of the colonial-era buildings around the Plaza de Armas are standing today. Walk a few blocks in any direction for churches and elegant houses that reveal just how wealthy this city once was. But the poor state of most buildings attests to the fact that the country's wealthy families have moved to neighborhoods to the south over the past century.The walls that surrounded the city were demolished in 1870, making way for unprecedented growth. A former hacienda became the graceful residential neighborhood of San Isidro. In the early 1920s the construction of tree-lined Avenida Arequipa heralded the development of neighborhoods such as bustling Miraflores and bohemian Barranco.Almost a third of the country's population of 29 million lives in the metropolitan area, many of them in relatively poor conos: newer neighborhoods on the outskirts of the city. Most residents of those neighborhoods moved there from mountain villages during the political violence and poverty that marked the 1980s and ’90s, when crime increased dramatically. During the past decade the country has enjoyed peace and steady economic growth, which have been accompanied by many improvements and refurbishment in the city. Residents who used to steer clear of the historic center now stroll along its streets. And many travelers who once would have avoided the city altogether now plan to spend a day here and end up staying two or three.

19 Dec 2023 - 20 Dec 2023

19

Pisco07:00 - 18:00

Lending its name to the clear brandy that is Peru's favorite tipple and a source of fierce national pride, the coastal town of Pisco and its surroundings hold a special place in the national psyche. It's the point where the Argentinean hero General San Martín landed with his troops to fight for Peru's freedom from Spanish rule. It's the city from which pisco was first exported, and it's also an important seaport that had its heyday during the 1920s, when guano (bird droppings used as fertilizer) from the nearby Islas Ballestas were worth nearly as much as gold.Modern-day Pisco shows little evidence of its celebrated past. Instead, what you'll find is a city struggling to get back on its feet after the disaster of August 2007, when a magnitude 8 earthquake shook the town for three minutes. Disregard for planning permission, illegal building extensions, and the use of adobe (mud brick) as the main building material had left a vast number of Pisco's buildings unable to withstand the quake, and hundreds of lives were lost as homes, churches, and hospitals collapsed during the tremor.Most travelers now base themselves in Paracas, just a few kilometers down the coast. For travelers wishing to assist in Pisco's recovery, there are numerous opportunities to volunteer. Organizations active in the area vary over time, but a good place to start looking for current opportunities is www.idealist.org. Even those without the time to volunteer should know that every nuevo sol spent in local businesses is contributing to rebuilding the region's economy.

21 Dec 2023

20

Pacific Ocean Cruising

22 Dec 2023

21
22

Coquimboundefined - 17:00

Coquimbo nestled in Northern Chile, means “place of calm water”, a happy accident of geography that encouraged its development as an important port. According to legend, the English corsair Sir Francis Drake has buried a considerable treasure in the city. In the early 19th century, Coquimbo was just a small fishing village, but when the railway reached the area joining the copper mines to the sea, the town and population increased dramatically. Today, Coquimbo offers the pleasures of a picturesque seaside promenade, the beautifully restored 19th-century architecture of the English Neighborhood and several fine beaches.

23 Dec 2023 - 24 Dec 2023

23

San Antonio09:00 - 19:00

25 Dec 2023

24

Puerto Montt,Chile

The first German colonists arrived to this area in 1852, and have remained to the present day, a small but influential percentage of the 130,000 inhabitants. The town spreads along a narrow seaboard and climbs the slopes enclosing it to the north. Since 1985, the city has experienced considerable growth and development, fueled by more than 30 salmon farms, in addition to forestry, fishing industries and service companies. A gateway to Chile’s picturesque lakes and spectacular indigo mountains.

26 Dec 2023

25

Puerto Montt08:00 - 17:00

For most of its history, windy Puerto Montt was the end of the line for just about everyone traveling in the Lake District. Now the Carretera Austral carries on southward, but for all intents and purposes Puerto Montt remains the region's last significant outpost, a provincial city that is the hub of local fishing, textile, and tourist activity.Today the city center is full of malls, condos, and office towers—it's the fastest-growing city in Chile—but away from downtown, Puerto Montt consists mainly of low clapboard houses perched above its bay, the Seno de Reloncaví. If it's a sunny day, head east to Playa Pelluco or one of the city's other beaches. If you're more interested in exploring the countryside, drive along the shore for a good view of the surrounding hills.

27 Dec 2023

26

Puerto Chacabuco10:00 - 20:00

The drive from Coyhaique to the town of Puerto Aisén and its port, Chacabuco, is beautiful. The mist hangs low over farmland, adding a dripping somnolence to the scenery. Dozens of waterfalls and rivers wend their way through mountain formations. Yellow poplars surround charming rustic lodges, and sheep and cattle graze on mossy, vibrant fields. The picture of serenity terminates at the sea, where the nondescript town of Puerto Aisén and its port Chacabuco, Coyhaique's link to the ocean, sits, a conduit to further beauty. This harbor ringed by snowcapped mountains is where you board the ferries that transport you north to Puerto Montt in the Lake District and Quellón on Chiloé, as well as boats headed south to the spectacular Laguna San Rafael.

28 Dec 2023

27

Laguna San Rafael National Park07:00 - 17:00

Some 150 nautical miles south of Puerto Chacabuco lies Laguna San Rafael National Park. Getting here is in itself a wonderful experience as the ship cruises through waterways, fjords and estuaries that offer stunning scenery. Within the park is the tallest peak in the Southern Andes, Mount San Valentín at 13,310 feet. Fields of ice extend over this mountain and the surrounding hills and from it 19 glaciers are born. However, the most famous attraction is the Mount San Valentín glacier. Here large blocks of ice can be seen calving off the glacier and crashing into the lake with a thunderous roar. Truly an amazing sight!

29 Dec 2023

28

Chilean Fjords

30 Dec 2023

29

Punta Arenas, Chile

Punta Arenas or ‘Sandy Point,’ is the most prominent settlement on the Strait of Magellan and the capital of Chile’s Magallanes y la Antártica Chilena Region. Founded in 1848, Punta Arenas was originally a remote military garrison and penal colony. Today, it is the charming gateway for a number of exhilarating experiences viewing the awesome majesty of Torres del Paine with its soaring peaks and rugged beauty .

31 Dec 2023

30

Punta Arenas08:00 - 18:00

Impenetrable forests, impassable mountains, and endless fields of ice define Chilean Patagonia, and meant that the region went largely unexplored until the beginning of the 20th century. Located in the southernmost part of the country, this area is still sparsely inhabited, though you will find a few populated places—like the colorful provincial city of Punta Arenas, which looks like it's about to be swept into the Strait of Magellan. Some unique wildlife, particularly colonies of elephant seals and penguins, call this breathtaking topography home. To the north is Parque Nacional Torres del Paine, the country's most magnificent natural wonder, and whose snow-covered peaks seem to rise vertically from the plains below. The vistas, such as the fantastic Avenue of the Glaciers, are breathtaking; along this stretch of the Beagle Channel, you can pass six tremendous glaciers all within a stone's throw of each other.Cruise SightsPunta Arenas. Founded a little more than 150 years ago, Punta Arenas (Sandy Point) was Chile's first permanent settlement in Patagonia. Plaza Muñoz Gamero, the central square, is surrounded by evidence of that early prosperity: buildings whose then-opulent brick exteriors recall a time when this was one of Chile's wealthiest cities. The newer houses here have colorful tin roofs, best appreciated when seen from a high vantage point such as the Mirador Cerro la Cruz. Although the city as a whole may not be particularly attractive, look for details: the pink-and-white house on a corner, the bay window full of potted plants, parking attendants wearing the regional blue and yellow colors, and schoolchildren in identical naval pea coats that remind you that the city's fate is tied to the sea.The Museo Naval y Marítimo extols Chile's high-seas prowess, particularly concerning Antarctica. Its exhibits are worth a visit for anyone with an interest in ships and sailing, merchant and military alike. Part of the second floor is designed like the interior of a ship, including a map and radio room. Pedro Montt 989. Admission charged.Housed in what was once the mansion of the powerful Braun-Menéndez family, the Museo Regional de Magallanes is an intriguing glimpse into the daily life of a wealthy provincial family at the beginning of the 20th century. Lavish Carrara marble hearths, English bath fixtures, and cordovan leather walls are among the original accoutrements. The museum also has an excellent group of displays depicting Punta Arenas's past, from the first European contact to the town's decline after the opening of the Panama Canal. The museum is half a block north of the main square. Magallanes 949. Admission charged.The resplendent 1895 Palacio Sara Braun is a national landmark and an architectural showpiece of southern Patagonia. Designed by a French architect, the house was built from materials and by craftsmen imported from Europe during the four years of construction. The city's central plaza and surrounding buildings soon followed, ushering in the region's golden era. Noteworthy are the lavish bedrooms, magnificent parquet floors, marble fireplaces, and hand-painted ceilings. Don't miss the portraits of Braun and her husband José Nogueira in the music room. Afterwards, head to the cellar for a drink or snack in the warm public tavern (a good portion of the mansion is leased to a hotel). Plaza Muñoz Gamero 716. Admission charged.Commonly referred to simply as "El Salesiano," the Museo Salesiano de Maggiorino Borgatello is operated by Italian missionaries whose order arrived in Punta Arenas in the 19th century. The Salesians, most of whom spoke no Spanish, proved to be daring explorers. Traveling throughout the region, they collected the artifacts made by indigenous tribes that are currently on display. Av. Bulnes 398. Admission charged.Isla Magdalena. Punta Arenas is the launching point for a boat trip to the Isla Magdalena to see the more than 100,000 Magellanic penguins at the Monumento Natural Los Pingúinos. A single trail, marked off by rope, is accessible to humans. The boat trip to the island, in the middle of the Estrecho de Magallanes, takes about two hours. Make sure to bring along warm clothing, even in summer; the island can be chilly, particularly if a breeze is blowing across the water.Parque Nacional Torres del Paine. Some 12 million years ago, lava flows pushed up through the thick sedimentary crust that covered the southwestern coast of South America, cooling to form a granite mass. Glaciers then swept through the region, grinding away all but the ash-gray spires that rise over the landscape of one of the world's most beautiful natural phenomena, now the Parque Nacional Torres del Paine (established in 1959). Snow formations dazzle along every turn of road, and the sunset views are spectacular.Among the 2,420-square-km (934-square-mi) park's most beautiful attractions are its lakes of turquoise, aquamarine, and emerald green waters. Another draw is its unusual wildlife. Creatures like the guanaco (a woollier version of the llama) and the ñandú (resembling a small ostrich) abound. They are used to visitors and don't seem to be bothered by the proximity of automobile traffic and the snapping of cameras. Predators, like the gray fox, make less frequent appearances. You may also spot the dramatic aerobatics of a falcon and the graceful soaring of the endangered condor. The beautiful puma is especially elusive, but sightings have become more common. Admission charged.Pingúinera de Seno Otway. The road to this penguin sanctuary begins 30 km (18 mi) north of Punta Arenas. Magellanic penguins, which live up to 20 years in the wild, return to their birthplace here every year to mate with the same partner. For about 2,000 penguin couples—no single penguins make the trip—home is this desolate and windswept land off the Otway Sound. In late September, the penguins begin to arrive from the southern coast of Brazil and the Falkland Islands. They mate and lay their eggs in early October, and brood their eggs in November. Offspring hatch between mid-November and early December. If you're lucky, you may catch sight of one of the downy gray chicks that stick their heads out of the burrows when their parents return to feed them. Otherwise you might see scores of the ungainly adult penguins waddling to the ocean from their nesting burrows. They swim for food every eight hours and dive up to 100 feet deep. The penguins depart from the sound in late March. Note that the sanctuary is a 1-km (1/2-mi) walk from the parking lot. It gets chilly, so bring a windbreaker. Admission charged.Reserva Nacional Laguna Parillar. This 47,000-acre reserve lies west of Puerto Hambre, a tranquil fishing village, and is centered around a shimmering lake in a valley flanked by hills. It's a great place for a picnic, and there are a number of well-marked paths that offer sweeping vistas over the Estrecho de Magallanes. About 2 km (1 mi) west of Puerto Hambre is a small white monolith that marks the geographical center of Chile, the midway point between Chile's northern port Arica and the South Pole.Cruise ShoppingWool may no longer be king of the economy, but vast flocks of sheep still yield a high-quality product that is woven into the clothing here. Leather products are also common, but the prices are not necessarily low. About 3 km (2 mi) north of Punta Arenas is the Zona Franca (Av. Bulnes). This duty-free zone is where people from all around the region come for low-priced electronics and other consumer items.

01 Jan 2024

31
32

Ushuaiaundefined - 18:00

Here at the bottom of the world, mountains and sea come together like in no other place in America. Considered to be the world’s southernmost city (though that is up for a heated debate), Ushuaia is the capital of the Argentine province of Tierra del Fuego. The town itself has an interesting museum and a variety of shops selling everything from souvenirs to duty-free luxury items.

02 Jan 2024 - 03 Jan 2024

33

Stanley, Falkland Islands

04 Jan 2024

34

Port Stanley07:00 - 18:00

Tiny Stanley, capital of the Falklands, seems in many ways like a British village fallen out of the sky. Many homes are painted in bright colours, adding visual appeal to this distant outpost. Not far offshore, the wreck of the Lady Elizabeth, is one of the many vessels remaining as a silent testimonial to the region's frequent harsh weather conditions.The islands, also known by their Spanish name of Islas Malvinas, are home to arguably more tuxedo-clad inhabitants of the penguin variety than human residents. Various species, such as Gentoo, Magellanic and the more elusive King penguins, either live here permanently or use the Falklands as a stopover on their migration route. Darwin found the islands' flora and fauna fascinating - no doubt you will, too.

05 Jan 2024

35
36

Puerto Madrynundefined - 16:00

Situated snugly in a well-protected bay of the Golfo Nuevo, Puerto Madryn is the Chubut region’s natural access point for the plains of Patagonia, a vast area covering a third of the country, but occupied by less than four percent of the population. The area was originally settled by a group of adventurous Welsh immigrants some 120 years ago. Although the town appears today unmistakably Argentine, Welsh customs, names and even some of the language have survived. Purto Madryn is your portal to the amazing nature reserves of Punta Tomba and the Peninsula Valdes.

06 Jan 2024 - 07 Jan 2024

37

Punta Del Este, Uruguay

Spend the day enjoying this beautiful, chic beach resort, its marinas, museums and fascinating shops. Or venture into the equally picturesque countryside and visit a cattle station. Take a trip to Sea Wolves Island and view a colony of endangered sea lions and seals. Visit the 18th-century city of Maldonado with its many enchanting buildings, cathedral and lovely museum. Look for fine leather goods, jewelry and artwork. Excellent beef and seafood highlight the menus here.

08 Jan 2024

38

Punta del Este09:00 - 18:00

Often likened to the Hamptons or St-Tropez, Punta del Este is a flashy destination where parties run nonstop in peak season. But it is also a destination that draws a range of beachgoers to its shores, from summering families to the celebrity jet-set. There's a bustling city on the beach downtown, as well as quiet countryside populated solely with upscale ranches called chacras or estancias, and creative, buzzing hamlets like La Barra and José Ignacio. Though it's pricey and at times a logistical challenge to get around, everyone finds something about Punta to love.The resort takes its name from the "east point" marking the division of the Río de la Plata on the west from the Atlantic Ocean to the east. It also lends its name to the broader region encompassing the nearby communities of Punta Ballena and La Barra de Maldonado. These days even José Ignacio, some 20 miles away, is grouped in. It's usually a given that Argentina’s upper class spends at least part of the summer in Punta, soaking in the ample rays.

09 Jan 2024

39
40

Buenos Airesundefined - 19:00

Glamorous and gritty, Buenos Aires is two cities in one. What makes Argentina's capital so fascinating is its dual heritage—part European, part Latin American. Plaza de Mayo resembles a grand square in Madrid, and the ornate Teatro Colón would not be out of place in Vienna. But you’ll know you’re in South America by the leather shoes for sale on cobbled streets and impromptu parades of triumphant soccer fans. Limited-production wines, juicy steaks, and ice cream in countless flavors are among the old-world imports the city has perfected.

10 Jan 2024 - 11 Jan 2024

41
42

Montevideoundefined - 15:00

Uruguay’s capital city hugs the eastern bank of the Río de la Plata. A massive coastal promenade (malecón) that passes fine beaches, restaurants, and numerous parks recalls the sunny sophistications of the Mediterranean and is always dotted with Montevideans strolling, exercising, and lounging along the water. Montevideo has its share of glitzy shopping avenues and modern office buildings, balanced with its historic old city and sumptuous colonial architecture, as well as numerous leafy plazas and parks. It is hard not to draw comparisons to its sister city Buenos Aires across the river, and indeed Montevideo strikes many as a calmer, more manageable incarnation of Argentina's capital.When the weather's good, La Rambla, a 22-km (14-mile) waterfront avenue that links the Old City with the eastern suburbs and changes names about a dozen times, gets packed with fishermen, ice-cream vendors, and joggers. Around sunset, volleyball and soccer games wind down as couples begin to appear for evening strolls. Polls consistently rate Montevideo as having the highest quality of life of any city in Latin America. After one visit here, especially on a lovely summer evening, you probably will agree.

12 Jan 2024 - 13 Jan 2024

43

Itajai, Brazil

Itajaí is a port city in southeast Brazil. It’s known for surf beaches like Praia Brava and Praia do Atalaia. At Geremias Beach, Bico do Papagaio rock resembles a parrot’s head. The 1955 Blessed Sacrament Church was built in neo-Gothic and Romanesque styles. The Ethno-Archaeological Museum shows prehistoric artifacts. Set in art-nouveau Marcos Konder Palace, the Historical Museum houses items tracing the city’s past.

14 Jan 2024

44

Itajai10:00 - 20:00

Though founded in the early 18th century, Itajai only started to develop during the mid-19th century when surrounding parts in the Brazilian southern state of Santa Catarina began to see an arrival of European immigrants who generated business for the port. Toward the close of that century, the town itself received a considerable influx of Italian, German and Polish immigrants, whose descendants now make up the bulk of the population. Out in the countryside, neat farms and distinct European architecture are still evidence of these early immigrant settlers. Despite its early beginnings, Itajai looks fairly new, with few buildings dating from before 1950. And while it may be short on “must sees,” the town benefits from nice beaches and its close proximity to Camboriú, one of the most popular tourist destinations in Santa Catarina state. In addition to white sand beaches, Camboriú boasts a busy commercial centre and the only cable car in the world to link two beaches. A day trip away is Blumenau, settled by German and Italian immigrants. Evidence of their heritage can still be seen in the town’s traditional style architecture and memorials. Pier Information The ship will be docked at the Itajai commercial pier, within walking distance to the town center. Taxis are generally available by the pier entrance, but you are advised to establish the fare before setting out. There are few English-speaking drivers. Shopping A variety of shops line the downtown pedestrian street. Most of them carry items of interest to the local population rather than tourists. The currency is the real. Cuisine As a busy port with freighters and tankers calling from around the world, Itajai offers a number of good but basic eateries, offering regional dishes as well as international fare. A bar and eatery, located just across from the pier entrance, is a popular attraction due to its seafaring clientele who have decorated the walls of the establishment over the years with interesting slogans and drawings. Other Sites There are few “must-see” sites in Itajai, but taking a stroll along the pedestrian street or having a look inside the cathedral may offer an interesting look at local lifestyle and activities. Beaches About a 10-15 minute drive away one can find Itajai’s beaches of Atalaia and Geremias, or still a bit farther the Praia Cabecudas. Beaches do not offer any tourist facilities, but are popular with locals. More upscale beach facilities can be found at Camboriú, a 6-mile (10 km) drive from Itajai. Private arrangements for independent sightseeing are limited in this port and subject to the availability of English-speaking guides.

15 Jan 2024

45

São Francisco do Sul08:00 - 18:00

Journey inland to vibrant São Paulo and see its modern skyscrapers and monuments, and visit the beautiful art museum. Or explore charming Santos and its extraordinary Botanical Garden including an Orchidarium with over 100 flower species and an aviary alive with macaws, toucans and parrots. Take a scenic drive to Guaruja and visit the resort town's fascinating aquarium.

16 Jan 2024

46

Santos08:00 - 19:00

Savor this gem of a historic town with its beautifully preserved Portuguese colonial architecture, charming narrow streets, imposing fort and exquisite churches. Enjoy a leisurely schooner cruise through this group of lush islands past quaint fishing villages and pristine beaches. Stop at a beach to swim, snorkel or just relax. Look for handmade clothing and local artwork. Indulge in fresh seafood at a seaside cafe.

17 Jan 2024

47

Parati08:00 - 18:00

The Costa Verde's main attraction, the coastal village of Parati, is about 180 miles south of Rio de Janeiro. Inhabited since 1660, this small town has remained fundamentally unaltered since its heyday. It was a staging post for 18th-century trade in Brazilian gold from Minas Gerais to Portugal. Raids and pirate attacks necessitated the establishment of a new route linking Minas Gerais directly with Rio de Janeiro. A decline in Parati’s fortunes resulted; being off the beaten track, it remained quietly hidden away. Today, the entire town has been declared a national historic monument by UNESCO as one of the most important examples of colonial architecture. With its newly acclaimed status, Parati has become a popular destination. Its beautifully restored colonial buildings line narrow, cobbled streets which are closed to vehicular traffic. Parati's population of some 15,000 people depends on fishing, farming and tourism for its livelihood. Local artists display their attractive crafts in galleries and souvenir shops. The town, reached via a long pier from the tender landing, must be explored on foot. Among Parati’s attractions is the 1722 Church of Santa Rita de Cassia, a classic example of Brazilian baroque architecture. The surrounding area boasts a scenic backdrop with green-clad mountains and numerous islands are scattered across the bay.

18 Jan 2024

48

Ilha Grande08:00 - 18:00

The tiny fishing village of Búzios, just 105 miles from Rio de Janeiro, is considered one of the ten most beautiful spots in the world. The village burst into prominence when French actress Brigitte Bardot visited here in her heyday (there’s a statue of her looking out to sea on the Orla Bardot). Today, this once sleepy village is an international resort -- St. Tropez, with a unique Brazilian beat. Búzios offers some of South America’s most attractive beaches. Indeed, you could lounge on one magnificent beach each hour of the day, sipping a delicious caipirinhas of course.

19 Jan 2024

49

Buzios08:00 - 18:00

Around two hours from Rio de Janeiro, Búzios is a string of beautiful beaches on an 8-km-long (5-mile-long) peninsula. It was the quintessential sleepy fishing village until the 1960s, when the French actress Brigitte Bardot holidayed here to escape the paparazzi and the place almost instantly transformed into a vacation sensation. Búzios has something for everyone. Some hotels cater specifically to families and provide plenty of activities and around-the-clock child care. Many have spa facilities, and some specialize in weeklong retreats. For outdoor enthusiasts, Búzios offers surfing, windsurfing, kitesurfing, diving, hiking, and mountain biking, as well as leisurely rounds of golf.

20 Jan 2024

50
51
52

Rio de Janeiroundefined - 21:00

Welcome to the Cidade Maravilhosa, or the Marvelous City, as Rio is known in Brazil. Synonymous with the girl from Ipanema, the dramatic views from Christ the Redeemer atop Corcovado mountain, and fabulously flamboyant Carnival celebrations, Rio is a city of stunning architecture, abundant museums, and marvelous food. Rio is also home to 23 beaches, an almost continuous 73-km (45-mile) ribbon of sand.As you leave the airport and head to Rio's beautiful Zona Sul (the touristic South Zone), you'll drive for about 40 minutes on a highway from where you'll begin to get a sense of the dramatic contrast between beautiful landscape and devastating poverty. In this teeming metropolis of 12 million people (6.2 million of whom live in Rio proper), the very rich and the very poor live in uneasy proximity. You'll drive past seemingly endless cinder-block favela, but by the time you reach Copacabana's breezy, sunny Avenida Atlântica—flanked on one side by white beach and azure sea and on the other by condominiums and hotels—your heart will leap with expectation as you begin to recognize the postcard-famous sights. Now you're truly in Rio, where cariocas (Rio residents) and tourists live life to its fullest.Enthusiasm is contagious in Rio. Prepare to have your senses engaged and your inhibitions untied. Rio seduces with a host of images: the joyous bustle of vendors at Sunday's Feira Hippie (Hippie Fair); the tipsy babble at sidewalk cafés as patrons sip their last glass of icy beer under the stars; the blanket of lights beneath the Pão de Açúcar (Sugarloaf Mountain); the bikers, joggers, strollers, and power walkers who parade along the beach each morning. Borrow the carioca spirit for your stay; you may find yourself reluctant to give it back.

21 Jan 2024 - 23 Jan 2024

53

Cabo Frio07:00 - 17:00

24 Jan 2024

54

Salvador, Brazil

25 Jan 2024

55

Salvador de Bahia08:00 - 18:00

According to Salvador's adopted son Jorge Amado, "In Salvador, magic becomes part of the every-day." From the shimmering golden light of sunset over the Baía do Todos os Santos, to the rhythmic beats that race along the streets, Salvador, while no longer Brazil's capital, remains one of its most captivating cities. A large dose of its exoticism comes down to its African heritage—at least 70% of its 2,675,000 population is classified as Afro-Brazilian—and how it has blended into Brazil's different strands, from the native Indians to the Christian colonizers. Salvadorans may tell you that you can visit a different church every day of the year, which is almost true—the city has about 300. Churches whose interiors are covered with gold leaf were financed by the riches of the Portuguese colonial era, when slaves masked their traditional religious beliefs under a thin Catholic veneer. And partly thanks to modern-day acceptance of those beliefs, Salvador has become the fount of Candomblé, a religion based on personal dialogue with the orixás, a family of African deities closely linked to nature and the Catholic saints. The influence of Salvador's African heritage on Brazilian music has also turned the city into one of the musical capitals of Brazil, resulting in a myriad of venues to enjoy live music across the city, along with international acclaim for exponents like Gilberto Gil, Caetano Veloso, and Daniela Mercury. Salvador's economy today is focused on telecommunications and tourism. The still-prevalent African culture draws many tourists—this is the best place in Brazil to hear African music, learn or watch African dance, and see capoeira, a martial art developed by slaves. In the district of Pelourinho, many colorful 18th- and 19th-century houses remain, part of the reason why this is the center of the tourist trade. Salvador sprawls across a peninsula surrounded by the Baía de Todos os Santos on one side and the Atlantic Ocean on the other. The city has about 50 km (31 miles) of coastline. The original city, referred to as the Centro Histórica (Historical Center), is divided into the Cidade Alta (Upper City), also called Pelourinho, and Cidade Baixa (Lower City). The Cidade Baixa is a commercial area—known as Comércio—that runs along the port and is the site of Salvador's indoor market, Mercado Modelo. You can move between the upper and lower cities on foot, via the landmark Elevador Lacerda, behind the market, or on the Plano Inclinado, a funicular lift, which connects Rua Guindaste dos Padres on Comércio with the alley behind Cathedral Basílica. From the Cidade Histórica you can travel north along the bay to the hilltop Igreja de Nosso Senhor do Bonfim. You can also head south to the point, guarded by the Forte Santo Antônio da Barra, where the bay waters meet those of the Atlantic. This area on Salvador's southern tip is home to the trendy neighborhoods of Barra, Ondina, and Rio Vermelho, with many museums, theaters, shops, and restaurants. Beaches along the Atlantic coast and north of Forte Santo Antônio da Barra are among the city's cleanest. Many are illuminated at night and have bars and restaurants that stay open late.

26 Jan 2024

56

Maceió12:00 - 20:00

Discover colonial Brazil in Recife and nearby Olinda and step back in time along narrow, winding streets amid meticulously restored homes, churches and lovely plazas. Admire the scenic views from the Malakoff Tower and Olinda’s hilltop plaza. Visit the old Dutch Fort, the Jewish Historic Archive and a local artist in his workshop and gallery. Take home lovely traditional Pernambuco handicrafts like clay figurines, wood sculptures, leather or woven straw items or hunt for unusual trinkets in artisan shops. Indulge in a delicious lobster lunch or just about anything your palate desires.

27 Jan 2024

57

Recife08:00 - 18:00

This vibrant metropolis has a spirit that's halfway between that of the modern cities of Brazil's South and of the traditional northeastern centers. It offers both insight on the past and a window to the future.It was in Pernambuco State, formerly a captaincy, that the most violent battles between the Dutch and the Portuguese took place. Under the Portuguese, the capital city was the nearby community of Olinda. But beginning in 1637 and during the Dutch turn at the reins (under the powerful count Maurício de Nassau), both Olinda and Recife were greatly developed.The city has beautiful buildings alongside the rivers that remind many visitors of Europe. Unfortunately, huge swathes of 19th-century buildings were razed to make way for modern structures. As a result, the center of the city has pockets of neocolonial splendor surrounded by gap-toothed modern giants. Today Recife is a leader in health care and has benefited from significant government investment in recent years, resulting in a boom in infrastructure and construction industries. It's also Brazil's third-largest gastronomic center—it's almost impossible to get a bad meal here.Recife is built around three rivers and connected by 49 bridges. Its name comes from the recifes (reefs) that line the coast. Because of this unique location, water and light often lend the city interesting textures. In the morning, when the tide recedes from Boa Viagem Beach, the rocks of the reefs slowly reappear. Pools of water are formed, fish flap around beachgoers, and the rock formations dry into odd colors. And if the light is just right on the Rio Capibaribe, the ancient buildings of Recife Antigo (Old Recife) are reflected off the river's surface in a watercolor display.

28 Jan 2024

58

Cruising The Coast Of Brazil

29 Jan 2024

59

Belem, Brazil

The busy port of Belém, Brazil is the gateway to the Amazon, and it is laden with jungle riches like hardwoods, orchids, nuts and minerals. It is known as the Metropolis of the Brazilian Amazon region, or Cidade das Mangueiras (city of mango trees) due to the number of those trees found in the city. Belém offers colorful markets, including indigenous handicrafts and quartz jewelry. Nearby is the emerald world of the Amazon’s Guama River.

30 Jan 2024

60

Belem08:00 - 18:00

31 Jan 2024

61
62

Devil's Islandundefined - 17:00

French Guiana is best known for the infamous penal colony to which convicts and undesirables were deported from France. For a long time the small archipelago was known by the name of “Devil’s Island.” The notorious convict settlements were built in 1852. Today, discover a lush, green landscape, where tropical foliage has grown over the old prison buildings and softened their aspect from forbidding to quaint. The most famous prisoners were Alfred Dreyfus, the French Army officer falsely convicted of treason, and Henri Charrière, who was immortalized in the movie “Papillon” for supposedly being the only convict to escape from “the Green Hell.” Please be advised that due to the under-developed nature of this destination, organized tours are not available.

01 Feb 2024 - 02 Feb 2024

63

Barbados

The island of Barbados is rimmed with mile after mile of pristine beaches. The eastern edge, rugged and hilly, lies on the Atlantic Ocean. The west coast, washed by the calmer leeward sea has most of the resort hotels. It is here that you will find the capital, Bridgetown, and older colonial settlements. Tour the meticulously restored 17th-century Sunbury Plantation House or admire the spectacular views from Gun Hill Signal Station. Adventures abound at sea by catamaran or Atlantis submersible and on land by an off-road island safari. Not to miss delicacies include the sweet and tender flying fish, washed down with a glass of Barbados’ famous Mount Gay rum.

03 Feb 2024

64

Bridgetown08:00 - 18:00

Located beside the island’s only natural harbour, the capital of Barbados combines modern and colonial architecture with glorious palm tree-lined beaches and a number of historical attractions. Experience the relaxed culture of the city renowned for its British-style parliament buildings and vibrant beach life, and seek out the Anglican church and the 19th-century Barbados Garrison. The distance between the ship and your tour vehicle may vary. This distance is not included in the excursion grades.

04 Feb 2024

65

Roseau07:00 - 17:00

Although it's one of the smallest capitals in the Caribbean, Roseau has the highest concentration of inhabitants of any town in the eastern Caribbean. Caribbean vernacular architecture and a bustling marketplace transport visitors back in time. Although you can walk the entire town in about an hour, you'll get a much better feel for the place on a leisurely stroll. For some years now, the Society for Historical Architectural Preservation and Enhancement (SHAPE) has organized programs and projects to preserve the city's architectural heritage. Several interesting buildings have already been restored. Lilac House, on Kennedy Avenue, has three types of gingerbread fretwork, latticed verandah railings, and heavy hurricane shutters. The J.W. Edwards Building, at the corner of Old and King George V sreets, has a stone base and a wooden second-floor gallery. The Old Market Plaza is the center of Roseau's historic district, which was laid out by the French on a radial plan rather than a grid, so streets such as Hanover, King George V, and Old radiate from this area. South of the marketplace is the Fort Young Hotel, built as a British fort in the 18th century; the nearby statehouse, public library, and Anglican cathedral are also worth a visit. New developments at the bay front on Dame M.E. Charles Boulevard have brightened up the waterfront.

05 Feb 2024

66

Philipsburg07:00 - 16:00

The capital of Dutch St. Maarten stretches about a mile (1½ km) along an isthmus between Great Bay and the Salt Pond and has five parallel streets. Most of the village's dozens of shops and restaurants are on Front Street, narrow and cobblestone, closest to Great Bay. It's generally congested when cruise ships are in port, because of its many duty-free shops and several casinos. Little lanes called steegjes connect Front Street with Back Street, which has fewer shops and considerably less congestion. Along the beach is a ½-mile-long (1-km-long) boardwalk with restaurants and several Wi-Fi hot spots.Wathey Square (pronounced watty) is in the heart of the village. Directly across from the square are the town hall and the courthouse, in a striking white building with cupola. The structure was built in 1793 and has served as the commander's home, a fire station, a jail, and a post office. The streets surrounding the square are lined with hotels, duty-free shops, restaurants, and cafés. The Captain Hodge Pier, just off the square, is a good spot to view Great Bay and the beach that stretches alongside.

06 Feb 2024

67

Bahamian Waters Cruising

07 Feb 2024

68

Miami

Sunny Florida skies, year-round warmth and sunshine, a buzzing nightlife and a mix of cultures define this cosmopolitan city. Celebrity-drenched South Beach attracts people-watchers and the Art Deco District is the largest collection of Art Deco architecture in the world. Tropical style shopping experience's are readily available from Bal Harbor to Lincoln Road and Coconut Grove. Enjoy authentic Cuban cuisine and culture along Calle Ocho or travel back in time with a visit to the historic Venetian Pool. There is something for everyone in this city dubbed the "Gateway to the America's."

08 Feb 2024

(This holiday is generally suitable for persons with reduced mobility. For customers with reduced mobility or any medical condition that may require special assistance or arrangements to be made, please notify your Cruise Concierge at the time of your enquiry, so that we can provide specific information as to the suitability of the holiday, as well as make suitable arrangements with the Holiday Provider on your behalf).

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This website will provide you with information on the financial protection that applies in the case of each holiday and travel service offered before you make your booking. At the time of booking, our Cruise Concierge will also confirm the financial protection applicable to your specific holiday. Please ask us for further information should you require it. The flight inclusive holidays on this website are financially protected by the ATOL scheme. But ATOL protection does not apply to all holiday and travel services listed on this website. If you do not receive an ATOL Certificate then the booking will not be ATOL protected. If you do receive an ATOL Certificate but all parts of your trip are not listed on it, those parts will not be ATOL protected. The cruise-only holidays on this website are financially protected by ABTA. Please see our booking terms and conditions for further information or for more information about financial protection and the ATOL Certificate, click here. SixStarCruises acts as a retail agent to you and also as a disclosed agent of the holiday provider (the Organiser of the holiday).